Holly Fernandez Lynch
Holly Fernandez Lynch
Executive Director

Executive Director

Holly Fernandez Lynch was appointed Executive Director in June 2012, but she has been involved with the Center since its inception, joining the inaugural cohort of fellows under the leadership of Founding Director, Einer Elhauge. At that time, she drafted the manuscript for Conflicts of Conscience in Health Care: An Institutional Compromise, published by MIT Press.  Holly has also practiced law at Hogan & Hartson, LLP in Washington, DC (now Hogan Lovells), where she counseled pharmaceutical and biotechnology clients on complex regulatory matters involving the Food and Drug Administration. In addition, Holly has government experience as a bioethicist working with the Human Subjects Protection Branch at NIH's Division of AIDS, where she advised the Division, its clinical trial networks, and grant recipients on research ethics and human subjects regulatory issues arising in HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment, and co-infection studies. Immediately prior to returning to Cambridge as a Center fellow in 2011, Holly served as Senior Policy and Research Analyst for President Obama's Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues.  Holly graduated Order of the Coif from the University of Pennsylvania Law School, where she was a Levy Scholar in Law and Bioethics. While pursuing her law degree, Holly also earned her Master of Bioethics from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.

Working with Faculty Director I. Glenn Cohen, Holly's primary goal and responsibility as Executive Director is to advance the Center's visibility and impact at Harvard and beyond, in both academic circles and the public square. In addition to promoting the Center's mission through public events, sponsored projects, and various collaborations, Holly has held an appointment as Lecturer on Law at Harvard Law School while teaching a seminar on Bioethics in the Courts. She also generates independent scholarship in law and bioethics, focusing on the regulation of human subjects research domestically and internationally, pharmaceutical development and regulatory policy, conflicts of conscience in both the medical and legal professions, and conflicts of interest in health care.