Kaiser Health News, June 20, 2018
Julie Appleby

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[...] Instead of starting with the hospital’s list price and negotiating down for discounts, the state began telling these facilities how much it was willing to pay — a “reference price” — for each type of hospitalization. State officials used generally conservative Medicare rates as a baseline and starting point for the discussion.

Before the plan took effect, hospital charges for state employees for the same service had varied widely, with some hospitals charging three to six times the Medicare rate for some services.

To even out the disparities and save money, the state decided it would pay an average of 234 percent of Medicare rates — a level of payment that hospitals indicated they would accept and an amount the state calculated would allow an efficient hospital to deliver high-quality care and still profit.

While other states and some private employers have set prices they are willing to pay for some standardized procedures — such as a colonoscopies or hip replacements — Montana’s experiment is more sweeping, covering all hospital services, and it uses Medicare as a common yardstick.

Two years in, the state calls the effort a success, saving $15.6 million this year over the estimate of what it would have paid without the change. Meanwhile, its reserve fund has grown and is so healthy the state dipped into it for other needs. [...]

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