Trump promises to ‘derail the gravy train’ and lower drug prices in ‘American Patients First’ plan

The Washington Post , May 11, 2018
Carolyn Y. Johnson, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article:  President Trump promised to “derail the gravy train” in the health-care system Friday afternoon, in a Rose Garden speech in which he unveiled his much-anticipated strategy to lower drug prices. The…

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The 6 most interesting parts of Trump’s mostly disappointing drug price plan

Vox, May 11, 2018
Dylan Scott, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article:  “We’re gonna see those prices go down. It’ll be a beautiful thing to watch,” President Donald Trump said in the Rose Garden on Friday. It’s a big promise. But the actual plan his administration put out doesn’t…

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How to Make a Dent in Crazy-High Drug Prices

Bloomberg, May 11, 2018
By Austin Frakt, citing Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: There’s no good reason to pay a lot for prescription drugs that don’t work well. But that’s what lots of Americans are doing. Some drug prices far outweigh any reasonable measure of the drug’s…

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Do NFL Safety Concerns Mean Regulators Should Get in the Game?

Bloomberg Environment, April 26, 2018
Fatima Hussein, featuring report by the Law and Ethics Initiative of the Football Players Health Study at Harvard University

From the article: Concussions involving NFL players have been an increasing worry. Now a debate has resurfaced about whether federal safety regulators should be able to fine teams found guilty of inflicting serious blows to players’ heads.

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Drug made famous by Shkreli’s 5,000% price hike is still $750 a pill

Ars Technica, May 4, 2018
Beth Mole, quoting W. Nicholson Price II (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: Disgraced ex-pharmaceutical executive and hedge fund manager Martin Shkreli is now behind bars, facing a seven-year prison sentence for securities fraud. Yet the drug-price hike that initially thrust him into the public spotlight—and infamy—hasn’t…

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For Shame: ‘Pharma Bro’ Shkreli Is In Prison, But Daraprim’s Price Is Still High

Washington Post, May 4, 2018
Shefali Luthra, quoting W. Nicholson Price II (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: The continued high price of the drug is a cautionary tale to those who hope that public shaming of a few “bad actors” can curb escalating drug prices, because the problem is rooted in the market’s underlying financial incentives. …

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Trump is set to unveil his plan to lower drug prices. Here are four things to watch for.

The Washington Post, May 10, 2018
Carolyn Y. Johnson, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: President Trump will deliver Friday afternoon a twice-delayed, much-anticipated speech about his plan to lower drug prices — after a year when harsh rhetoric against drugmakers was accompanied by little action.

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Work Requirements Give Republicans Cover to Expand Medicaid

U.S. News, April 23, 2018
Gabrielle Levy, quoting Allison K. Hoffman (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: While the Medicaid law sets certain mandatory minimums of eligibility and coverage, the waiver program allows states wide latitude to run their programs as they see fit. For state Republican lawmakers demonstrating a willingness to consider Medicaid…

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HealthAffairs Podcast: Precision Medicine

Health Affairs Podcast, May 8, 2018
Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus), Alan Weil, Geoffrey Ginsburg, Alessandro Blasimme, Kathryn A. Phillips, Daryl Pritchard,

Overview of the Podcast: The May 2018 issue of Health Affairs on "Precision Medicine," contains a timely and comprehensive look at the use of data and genetic information to better diagnose and treat patients. It features real world examples of how precision medicine…

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Authorities Use DNA Testing Service to Identify “Golden State Killer” - What Does This Mean for You?

WCIA, The Takeaway, May 7, 2018
Heather Goldstone & Elsa Partan, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article: Late last month, authorities charged a man in Sacramento County, California as the so-called Golden State Killer after tracking him down with a private DNA test company, one called GEDmatch.  Joseph James DeAngelo is accused of…

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Planned Parenthood sues Trump administration over federal funding

The Washington Times, May 2, 2018
Alex Swoyer, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article: Three Planned Parenthood affiliates sued Wednesday to demand taxpayer money keep flowing to the country’s largest abortion network, saying a new Trump administration policy appears designed to cut them out of family planning money. …

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For Shame: ‘Pharma Bro’ Shkreli Is In Prison, But Daraprim’s Price Is Still High

The Washington Post , May 4, 2018
Shefali Luthra, quoting W. Nicholson Price (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: It was 2015 when Martin Shkreli, then CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals and the notorious “pharma bro,” jacked up the cost of the lifesaving drug Daraprim by 5,000 percent. Overnight, its price tag skyrocketed from $13.50…

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What your government can’t tell you about drug prices

CBC News, May 3, 2018
Kelly Crowe, Suit brought by Jean-Christophe Belisle Pipon (Visiting Researcher)

From the article: It took three years of fighting for access to confidential drug information, but a Quebec bioethicist has punched a tiny hole in the iron wall of secrecy surrounding patented drug prices. Two weeks ago, Jean-Christophe Bé​lisle…

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S.J.D. candidate awarded scholarship to study health activism from a legal perspective

Harvard Law Today, May 1, 2018
Audrey Kunycky, reporting on Maayan Sudai (Student Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Maayan Sudai, an S.J.D. candidate at Harvard Law School, has been awarded a prestigious scholarship from Israel’s Dan David Foundation to support her work examining health activism from a legal perspective. Every…

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Vaccine against Meningitis: Quebec Pays Twice As Much As United Kingdom

La Presse, April 25, 2018
Marie-Claude Malboeuf, Suit brought by Jean-Christophe Belisle Pipon (Visiting Researcher)

From the article: Quebec has agreed to pay twice as much as the United Kingdom for a new vaccine against meningitis, the effectiveness of which seemed uncertain. The disclosure of the price paid by Quebec - about $80 a dose - was…

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Supreme Court rules that patent reviews detested by pharma are constitutional

STAT, April 24, 2018
Ed Silverman, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: In a blow to the pharmaceutical industry, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that a controversial procedure for reviewing patent disputes does not violate the constitutional rights of patent holders. Known as inter partes…

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Federal Appeals Court Finds State’s Drug Price-Gouging Law Unconstitutional

Shots: Health News From NPR, April 17, 2018
Shefali Luthra, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: States are continuing to do battle with budget-busting prices of prescription drugs. But a recent federal court decision could limit the tools available to them — underscoring the challenge states face as, in the absence of federal action,…

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The breakthrough therapy designation for promising cancer drugs is good for patients

STAT, April 27, 2018
Jeff Allen, quoting Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: One exciting component of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act was the creation of the breakthrough therapy designation. It allows an all-hands-on-deck approach at the FDA to determine the best path forward when the…

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Assessing the FDA’s Breakthrough Drug Program After Six Years

ASH Clinical News, April 25, 2018
ASH Clinical News, quoting Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: In the first four years of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) breakthrough-therapy designation program, the agency approved 31 “breakthrough” drugs, but many were approved with limited evidence of added benefit, according…

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REPORT: Ethical Issues Related to the Creation of Synthetic Human Embryos

Harvard University Embryonic Stem Cell Research Oversight (“ESCRO”) Committee, April 2018

Report Summary Authored by Robert D. Truog, MD (Center for Bioethics, Harvard Medical School) and Melissa J. Lopes, JD…

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