Trump unveils plan to cut drug prices

The Lancet, June 2, 2018, vol. 391, no. 10136
by Susan Jaffe, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: A trade association that represents PBMs disagrees. Eliminating rebates would leave patients and insurers “at the mercy of drug manufacturer pricing strategies”, according… Read More

Is Trump giving the EU higher drug prices too?

DW, June 1, 2018
by Lindsey Rae Gjording, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Through single-payer health care systems the EU is able to regulate consumer costs at reasonable levels. It also makes decisions about what new drugs are worth spending taxpayer money… Read More

Trump Wants Medicaid to Push for Lower Drug Prices – But Will Patients Be Hurt?

PEW, May 30, 2018
by Michael Ollove, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: While 74 percent of closed formularies result in lower prices, 21 percent result in price increases, a 2016 report in the American Journal of Managed Care found. And 29… Read More

Judge Tells Maine It Must Implement Voter-Approved Medicaid Expansion…

Kaiser Health News, June 5, 2018

Judge Tells Maine It Must Implement Voter-Approved Medicaid Expansion That Governor Has Been Stonewalling HN Morning Briefing: Summaries of health policy coverage from major news organizations Maine… Read More

After Years of Trying, Virginia Finally Will Expand Medicaid

New York Times, May 30, 2018
by Abby Goodnough

WASHINGTON — Virginia’s Republican-controlled Senate voted on Wednesday to open Medicaid to an additional 400,000 low-income adults next year, making it all but certain that the state will… Read More

Uninsured Rate Remains Basically Flat Despite Republicans’ Attempts To Chip Away At Health Law

Kaiser Health News, May 22, 2018

KHN Morning Briefing: Summaries of health policy coverage from major news organizations The numbers from the government survey suggest a surprising resilience of the health law and its expansion of… Read More

Work Requirements Give Republicans Cover to Expand Medicaid

U.S. News, April 23, 2018
by Gabrielle Levy, quoting Allison K. Hoffman (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: While the Medicaid law sets certain mandatory minimums of eligibility and coverage, the waiver program allows states wide latitude to run their programs as they see fit. For state Republican… Read More

HealthAffairs Podcast: Precision Medicine

Health Affairs Podcast, May 8, 2018
by Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus), Alan Weil, Geoffrey Ginsburg, Alessandro Blasimme, Kathryn A. Phillips, Daryl Pritchard,

Overview of the Podcast: The May 2018 issue of Health Affairs on "Precision Medicine," contains a timely and comprehensive look at the use of data and genetic information to better diagnose and treat patients.… Read More

Redesigning Provider Payments to Reduce Long-Term Costs by Promoting Healthy Development

National Academy of Medicine, April 20, 2018
by Nathaniel Z. Counts (Student Fellow alumnus), Neal Halfon, Kelly J. Kelleher, J. David Hawkins, Laurel K. Leslie, Thomas F. Boat, Mary Ann McCabe

From the article: Cognitive, aff ective, and behavioral health (CAB) conditions are among the costliest and fastest growing in the United States. An array of interventions is demonstrated to be eff ective… Read More

Massachusetts Wants To Drive Down Medicaid Drug Costs: Why Is The Administration So Nervous?

Health Affairs, April 5, 2018
by Nicholas Bagley, and Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Although drug formularies are ubiquitous in Medicare and the private insurance market, they’re absent in Medicaid. By law, state Medicaid programs that offer prescription drug… Read More

Utah’s quixotic Medicaid expansion plan, explained

Vox, April 2, 2018
by Dylan Scott, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Utah wants to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. Kind of. The state legislature has passed and Gov. Gary Herbert has signed a bill that would partially expand… Read More

NOW AVAILABLE! Big Data, Health Law, and Bioethics

Cambridge University Press, March 2018
by I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director), Holly Fernandez Lynch (former Executive Director), Urs Gasser, and Effy Vayena

Now available - order it online!  From the book: When data from all aspects of our lives can be relevant to our health - from our habits at the grocery store and our Google searches to our FitBit… Read More

Prevalence of Publicly Available Expanded Access Policies

Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics, March 23, 2018
by Emily Jung (Petrie-Flom Student Intern), Patricia J. Zettler, Aaron S. Kesselheim

From the Article: The Food and Drug Administration's expanded access program allows patients with serious or immediately life‐threatening conditions to seek access to experimental drugs and treatments… Read More

Between the lines on insurers and drug rebates

Axios Vitals, March 28, 2018
by Sam Baker, citing Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: UnitedHealthcare and Aetna have committed to lowering some consumers' out-of-pocket drug costs by sharing the rebates that pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs) negotiate with… Read More

Can Rationing through Inconvenience Be Ethical?

Hasting Center Report, Volume 48, Issue 1
by Nir Eyal, Paul L. Romain, and Christopher T. Robertson (Academic Fellow alumnus)

From the Article: In this article, we provide a comprehensive analysis and a normative assessment of rationing through inconvenience as a form of rationing. By “rationing through inconvenience”… Read More

Promoting Competition To Address Pharmaceutical Prices

Health Affairs, March 15, 2018
by Jonathan Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus), Aaron S. Kesselheim

From the article Under ideal market conditions, competition among producers of a commercial good can drive down prices. The market for pharmaceuticals, however, is inefficient in many ways, leading to… Read More

NSHRF Hosts AMS Funding Competitions / Fellowship
Nova Scotia Health Research Foundation

Deadline: April 06, 2018

General Description: Nova Scotia Health Research Foundation (NSHRF) is hosting the Associated Medical Services (AMS) project grant, postdoctoral fellowship and doctoral completion award program.… Read More

Lawmakers file a bill to block maneuvers like Allergan’s patent deal with Mohawks

STAT, March 7, 2018
by Ed Silverman quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Angered by a controversial Allergan (AGN1 ) patent maneuver, a handful of lawmakers introduced a bill that would prohibit tribal sovereign immunity from being used to block certain… Read More

The Trump administration just made another big move to reshape the healthcare system

Business Insider, February 20, 2018
by Bob Bryan, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: "Short-term insurance plans will cherry pick healthy people, leaving ACA-compliant plans to cover a sicker pool with higher premiums," Levitt tweeted. "With the expansion in short-term… Read More

Healthy People Health Policy Fellowship
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Deadline: February 24, 2018

DescriptionA fellowship is available in the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP) within the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health (OASH), Office of the Secretary (OS), at the… Read More

Delinking Reimbursement

Minnesota Law Review, Forthcoming, February 14, 2018
by Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Over the past few years, calls for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to approve pharmaceuticals more speedily have grown louder. At the same time, many have argued that America’s… Read More

Trump fires first salvo on drug prices

The Hill, February 12, 2018
by Peter Sullivan, referencing Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: President Trump is beginning to move on high drug prices, unveiling a series of modest proposals in his budget request released Monday. It’s the first time Trump has issued major… Read More

Reforming Biopharmaceutical Pricing at Home and Abroad

Executive Office of the President of the United States, February 2018
by The Council of Economic Advisers, citing work by Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: The affordability of healthcare and biopharmaceutical drugs is a top concern for Americans. It is often asserted that promoting innovation and affordable drugs are conflicting goals.… Read More

Budget, White Paper Provide Insight Into Trump Administration’s Strategy On Drug Pricing

Health Affairs, February 12, 2018
by Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: During his first year in office, President Donald Trump spoke often about the problem of high drug prices but took no action on the subject. President Trump’s new budget proposal and… Read More

Trump’s abandoned promise to bring down drug prices, explained

Vox, February 2, 2018
by Dylan Scott, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: One year into Donald Trump’s presidency, as he delivered his first State of the Union address, he has more or less abandoned his outspoken pledges to bring down the cost of America’s… Read More

The Federal Right to Try Act of 2017

JAMA Internal Medicine, January 22, 2018
by Alison Bateman-House and Christopher T. Robertson (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: In 2017, President Trump said that “one thing that’s always disturbed”1 him is that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) denies access to experimental drugs… Read More

Drug Policy: The Year In Review, And The Year Ahead

Health Affairs Blog, January 4, 2018
by Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article:  Last year was an unquestionably busy time for health care news of all kinds. Media and policy coverage rightly focused on the many attempts to repeal the Affordable Care Act, but… Read More

Regulating Black-Box Medicine

Michigan Law Review, Vol. 116, Issue 3
by W. Nicholson Price II (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the paper: Data drive modern medicine. And our tools to analyze those data are growing ever more powerful. As health data are collected in greater and greater amounts, sophisticated algorithms based… Read More

Contraceptive Coverage and the Balance Between Conscience and Access

JAMA, October 19, 2017
by Ronit Y. Stahl and Holly Fernandez Lynch (Former Executive Director, Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: When the Obama administration included contraception in the essential benefits package to be covered by employer-sponsored health insurance plans under the Affordable Care Act, it sought… Read More

Innovative Contracting for Pharmaceuticals and Medicaid’s Best-Price Rule

Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law, September 28, 2017
by Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna), Nicholas Bagley, and Darius N. Lakdawalla

From the paper: In recent years, drug manufacturers and private payers have expressed interest in novel pricing models that more closely link a drug’s price to its value. Indication-based pricing,… Read More

Influence, integrity, and the FDA: An ethical framework

Science, Sep 1, 2017: Vol. 357, Issue 6354, pp. 876-877.
by Spencer Phillips Hey, I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director), Eli Y. Adashi, & Aaron S. Kesselheim

Summary: Among the core missions of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are protecting public health by assuring the safety and efficacy of drugs, biologics, and medical devices and advancing public… Read More

New Serious Illness Program Design and Implementation Framework

Coalition to Transform Advanced Care (C-TAC), August 17, 2017
by Khue Nguyen, Theresa Schmidt, Robin Whitney, Gary Bacher, Janice Bell, Sibel Ozcelik (Lead Authors)

As part of the Project on Advanced Care and Health Policy, the Petrie-Flom Center hosted two convenings on Critical Pathways to Improved Care for Serious Illness.  Through roundtable discussions… Read More

Academic Fellow Alum Matthew J. B. Lawrence Joins Faculty at Dickinson Law (Penn State)

Dickinson Law, Penn State University, August 1, 2017

Matthew J.B. Lawrence has joined the faculty of Penn State’s Dickinson Law as assistant professor of law. An expert in the fields of health law and administrative law, Lawrence will teach Health… Read More

Meet The People Doing Poop Transplants The Government Doesn’t Want Them To

Buzzfeed, June 28, 2017
by Nidhi Subbaraman, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Some scientists and legal experts have suggested that poop be regulated like a tissue — something that was derived from the body, and therefore subject to less stringent… Read More

The Case for Giving Health-Care Consumers a ‘Nudge’

Wall Street Journal, June 25, 2017
by Lisa Ward, interviewing Christopher T. Robertson (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

The Case for Giving Health-Care Consumers a ‘Nudge:’ A law professor argues that people will make better choices if they’re asked the right way For example, some states encourage child… Read More

At Drug Hearing, Senators Discuss Meanings of Price and Value - and Debate Health Reform

Health Affairs Blog, June 20, 2017
by Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article by Rachel E. Sachs, (Academic Fellow Alumna): On Tuesday, June 13, the Senate Health, Education, Labor, & Pensions (HELP) Committee held the first of three planned hearings… Read More

This Pharma Company Won’t Commit to Fairly Pricing a Zika Vaccine You Helped Pay For

The Huffington Post, June 9, 2017
by Alexander C. Kaufman, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: “The incentives for any one company to raise its prices or engage in questionable conduct are quite high, while the incentives for the industry as a whole to corral and police its… Read More

ERISA: A Bipartisan Problem For The ACA And The AHCA

Health Affairs Blog, June 2, 2017
by Abbe R. Gluck, Allison K. Hoffman (Academic Fellow Alumna), and Peter D. Jacobson

From the post: The Supreme Court has once again been called on to mediate the boundaries of a far-reaching, infamously complex, federal employee benefits law. And once again this law may have… Read More

From the Technical to the Personal: Teaching and Learning Health Insurance Regulation and Reform

Saint Louis University Law Journal, Vol. 61, no. 411
by Allison K. Hoffman (Academic Fellow Alumna), Whitney A. Brown, and Lindsay Cutler

From the article: In the Fall of 2016, I taught Health Law and Policy for the fourth consecutive semester. In this repeat loop, one thing has become increasingly clear: the aspect of this survey course… Read More

How a Supreme Court ruling on printer cartridges could have a big impact on drug prices

STAT News, May 30, 2017
by Meghana Keshavan, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: A Supreme Court ruling on international printer cartridge sales could have major implications for, of all things, drug pricing and global health. The case in question involves patents,… Read More

New Issue of the Journal of Law and the Biosciences

Journal of Law and the Biosciences (JLB), Vol. 4, No. 1, April 2017

The Journal of Law and the Biosciences, the open-access journal launched in 2014 by the Petrie-Flom Center and Harvard Law School in partnership with Duke University and Stanford University, has… Read More

The Trump administration could bring down drug prices. But it would take guts

STAT News, May 15, 2017
by Ed Silverman, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: “If Price and [President] Trump are interested in lower-priced drugs, they have access to a tool that enables them to do that,” explained Rachel Sachs, an associate professor… Read More

The White House budget director dropped a hint about how Trump could bring drug prices down

Washington Post, May 12, 2017
by Carolyn Y. Johnson, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the artcile: Trump has repeatedly said that drug prices are too high but has often suggested that increased bidding would be the best way to bring down prices. It has been unclear how that… Read More

New FDA Chief Scott Gottlieb: Medication Reformer or Big Pharma Shill?

The Fix, May 18, 2017
by Paul Gaita, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Gottlieb's position has earned cautious approval from medical industry observers like Washington University associate professor Rachel Sachs, who wrote, "As someone who understands… Read More

New York state wants its prescription drug money back—or else

USA Today, May 18, 2017
by Julie Appleby, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: New York’s Medicaid program, for example, has seen its drug spending rise on average 8% each year over the past three years, after taking into account existing rebates. The… Read More

There’s a federal law to lower drug prices—and Louisiana may just use it

Ars Technica, May 4, 2017
by Beth Mole, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Rachel Sachs, a law professor at Washington University in St Louis, told the KHN that this makes a good argument for summoning 28 U.S.C. § 1498. “The case is strong,”… Read More

Louisiana proposes tapping a century-old patent law to cut hepatitis C drug prices

Kaiser Health News, May 2, 2017
by Sarah Jane Tribble, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Rachel Sachs, an associate professor of law at Washington University in St. Louis who attended the recent Johns Hopkins meeting, said she believes “the case is strong” in… Read More

Promoting demand-side innovation: prizes for payers

Journal of Law and the Biosciences, May 5, 2017
by Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the paper: Promoting Healthcare Innovation on the Demand Side,1 the recent article by Professors Rebecca Eisenberg and Nicholson Price, is a thoughtful, detailed look at an issue that has gone… Read More

ORDER NOW & GET 20% OFF! Law, Religion, and Health in the United States

Cambridge University Press, July 2017
by Holly Fernandez Lynch (Executive Director), I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director), and Elizabeth Sepper

About the Book: While the law can create conflict between religion and health, it can also facilitate religious accommodation and protection of conscience. Finding this balance is critical to addressing… Read More

Petrie-Flom Welcomes New Executive Director!

Petrie-Flom Center, May 10, 2017

We are thrilled to announce that Carmel Shachar, JD, MPH (HLS ’10, HSPH ’10), will join the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School as our… Read More

Value-Based Pricing For Pharmaceuticals In The Trump Administration

Health Affairs Blog, April 27, 2017
by Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna), Nicholas Bagley, and Darius Lakdawalla

From the article: Everyone seems to agree: Drug prices are too damn high. Scandalous prices for new drugs and enormous price hikes on old drugs have focused public ire on the pharmaceutical… Read More

As a competitor encroached, Mylan took one state to court to push EpiPen sales, documents

STAT News, April 24, 2017
by Ike Swetlitz, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article:  Three lawyers who reviewed the case at the request of STAT said they could not think of another instance when a pharmaceutical company sued to protect the status of its medication… Read More

Death By 1,000 Cuts: How Republicans Can Still Alter Your Coverage

Kaiser Health News, April 10, 2017
by Jay Hancock, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: “It’s the single-biggest problem facing the exchanges,” said Rachel Sachs, a health law professor at Washington University in St. Louis. “That would make insurers… Read More

Senate will vote to overturn Planned Parenthood protections

POLITICO, March 30, 2017
by Dan Diamond, featuring NEJM article co-authored by Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the newsletter: What the experts are saying. NEJM posted a pair of perspectives that offering dueling approaches to Gottlieb and the challenges he may face, if confirmed. — "An FDA Commissioner… Read More

Price doesn’t satisfy Congress on appropriations

POLITICO, March 30, 2017
by Darius Tahir, featuring NEJM article co-authored by Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the newsletter: The latest issue of the New England Journal of Medicine is full of eHealth-relevant papers. Two articles consider Scott Gottlieb’s nomination for FDA commissioner. One,… Read More

Scott Gottlieb’s FDA Commissioner Confirmation Hearing: Remarkably Unremarkable

Health Affairs Blog, April 7, 2017
by Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the post: On Wednesday morning, the United States Senate Committee on Health, Energy, Labor, and Pensions conducted the confirmation hearing for Dr. Scott Gottlieb, President Trump’s nominee… Read More

The Original Lie About Obamacare

New York Times, March 14, 2017
by David Leonhardt, quoting Michael Anne Kyle (Student Fellow Alumna)

From the article: At that point, Obama faced a second choice – between forging ahead with a substantively bipartisan bill and forgetting about covering the uninsured. The kumbaya plan for which pundits… Read More

Call for Papers
AMA Journal of Ethics

Deadline: Various.

The AMA Journal of Ethics® is an open-access, MEDLINE-indexed online journal of expert-solicited and peer-reviewed content that receives over one million visits annually (and growing). Our… Read More

Trump’s ‘Two Out, One In’ Regulatory Policy May Apply to Some FDA Guidance

Regulatory Affairs Professionals Society (RAPS), February 6, 2017
by Zachary Brennan, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: As far as what existing regulations if repealed would be considered part of the “two out” part of the EO, OMB notes, “Any existing regulatory action that imposes… Read More

E&C delays vote on drug pricing bill

Politico, February 6, 2017
by Sarah Karlin-Smith, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: On cost: studies have found that it usually takes a handful of generic drugscompeting for market share for prices to drop. “You usually need to get to something like three or four… Read More

What You Don’t Know About the Cost of Grandma’s Prescription

Pacific Standard, February 3, 2017
by Carson Leigh Brown, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: To grapple with how and why the process works this way, we talked with Rachel Sachs, an associate professor of law at Washington University in St. Louis. Sachs studies how health… Read More

What Experts in Law and Medicine Have to Say About the Cost of Drugs

The Health Care Blog, February 2, 2017
by Andy Oram, on PFC's 5th Annual Health Law Year in P/Review Conference

From the article; Pharmaceutical drug costs impinge heavily on consumers’ consciousness, often on a monthly basis, and have become such a stress on the public that they came up repeatedly among both… Read More

The Trump-era Supreme Court could erode abortion access with a ‘death by 1,000 cuts’

Business Insider, February 1, 2017
by Rebecca Harrington, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article: Glenn Cohen, a health-law expert and professor at Harvard Law School, said two kinds of laws provide the most likely paths for SCOTUS to overturn or undermine Roe. The first are known… Read More

Behavioral science suggests that Obamacare may not change as much as Republicans claim

STAT, January 3, 2017
by Christopher R. Robertson (Academic Fellow Alumnus), I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director), & Holly Fernandez Lynch (Executive Director)

From the article: In the waning days of his administration, President Obama encouraged Americans to take advantage of the opportunity to get health insurance in what may be the last open enrollment period… Read More

How Donald Trump’s Health Secretary Pick Endangers Women

New York Times, December 28, 2016
by Allison K. Hoffman (Academic Fellow Alumna) and Jill R. Horwitz

LOS ANGELES — With the selection of Representative Tom Price as secretary of health and human services, President-elect Donald J. Trump has taken a giant step toward undermining the health… Read More

What’s Confusing Us About Mental Health Parity

HealthAffairs Blog, December 22, 2016
by Nathaniel Counts (Student Fellow alumnus), Timothy Clement, Amanda Mauri, Paul Gionfriddo, and Garry Carneal

The Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (MHPAEA) has been law since 2008. MHPAEA provided that health plans could not limit mental health or substance use disorder benefits in a way… Read More

The Oxford Handbook of U.S. Healthcare Law

The Oxford Handbooks, July 2016 (online), January 2017 (print)
by Edited by I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director), Allison K. Hoffman (Academic Fellow Alumna), and William M. Sage

Abstract: The Oxford Handbook of U.S. Health Law covers the breadth and depth of health law through the words and insights of the best scholars in the field. The content is valuable to readers with… Read More

What Health Reform Reveals about Health Law

In The Oxford Handbook of U.S. Healthcare Law, I. Glenn Cohen, Allison K. Hoffman, and William M. Sage, eds., July 2016 (online), January 2017 (print)
by Allison K. Hoffmann (Academic Fellow Alumna)

Chapter Abstract: This chapter describes the arc of health reform in the U.S. over the Twentieth Century and explores how the most-recent major reform, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act,… Read More

Funding for Cures Bill Remains Sticking Point for Health Groups

Bloomberg, November 28, 2016
by Anna Edney and Zachary Tracer, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: The Cures bill will fund some prevention efforts, said Lynne Weil, a spokeswoman for Representative Diana DeGette, a Democrat from Colorado who helped shape the House’s original… Read More

Morning View 11-28-16: Pharmaceuticals News

Institute for Clinical and Economic Review's Morning View, November 28, 2016
by Mitchell Stein, citing Bill of Health post by Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: On Friday, building on the long-standing DC tradition of releasing gargantuan regulations and bills over holiday weekends, the “final” text of the 21st Century Cures bill… Read More

House lines up biotech lollipops as support grows for an epic 21st Century Cures Act

Endpoints News, November 28, 2016
by James Carroll, citing Bill of Health blog post by Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: According to Kaiser Health News, more than 1,400 lobbyists have taken a crack — for and against — various sections of this bill. And that helps explain why… Read More

Lame duck Congress looks for swift approval of massive medical innovation bill

AJC.com (The Atlanta Journal-Constitution), November 27, 2016
by Jamie Dupree, citing Tweet & Bill of Health post by Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: (Tweet by Rachel E. Sachs) My 1st thoughts on today's draft of 21st Century Cures: some bad provisions are gone, some remain, & some to watch. http://blogs.harvard.edu/billofhealth/2016/11/25/the-newest-21st-century-cures-draft-moderates-but-doesnt-eliminate-controversy/ … Read More

Online J-Term Health Law Courses
875 Summit Ave. | St. Paul, MN 55105

Deadline: January 02, 2017

The Mitchell Hamline School of Law Health Law Institute is pleased to offer two online health law courses in January 2017!                        … Read More

ORDER NOW & RECEIVE 30% OFF: Nudging Health

Johns Hopkins University Press, October 2016
by I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director), Holly Fernandez Lynch (Executive Director), and Christopher T. Robertson (Academic Fellow alumnus), eds.

Abstract of the Introduction:  This introductory chapter to the edited volume Nudging Health: Health Law and Behavioral Economics (I. Glenn Cohen, Holly Fernandez Lynch, Christopher T. Robertson,… Read More

Drug prices: Where do we go after the Election?

The Conversation US, October 30, 2016
by Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

Martin Shkreli. Valeant Pharmaceuticals. Mylan. These names have become big news, but just a year ago, most Americans devoted little time and attention to the question of pharmaceutical pricing. Now, a… Read More

Student Fellow Alumna Lauren Taylor on the American Health Care Paradox

Center for Bioethics, Harvard Medical School, October 27, 2016

Lauren A. Taylor, MPH, MDiv will discuss her book,  The American Health Care Paradox: Why Spending More is Getting Us Less. Commentator: John E. McDonough, DrPH, MPA, Professor… Read More

Harvard Scholars Come to the Defense of Alabama Death Row Inmate

Alabama Political Reporter, October 19, 2016
by Chip Brownlee

From the article: Harvard College medical ethicists filed a brief this month with the US Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit outlining an argument in support of Thomas Arthur, a 74-year-old death… Read More

Medical ethicists challenge court ruling on lethal injection in Alabama case

ScienceDaily, October 18, 2016
by Harvard Medical School

From the article: Court orders demanding death row inmates to provide "specific, detailed and concrete alternatives" to a state's lethal injection protocol compel those inmates to produce evidence… Read More

President’s Innovation Challenge
Harvard Innovation Lab

Deadline: December 5, 2016

General Description:We are pleased to announce the sixth annual President's Innovation Challenge for entrepreneurship. Hosted by the Harvard Innovation Labs, the Challenge amplifies the creativity,… Read More

Health Care Project Manager
Health Care & Fair Competition Bureau

Deadline: October 7, 2016

General Description:Attorney General Maura Healey is looking for a highly motivated individual to manage her Office’s projects relating to health care data reporting, monitoring, and oversight… Read More

2017 Mollie and Paul Hill Student Writing Competition
Florida State University Center for Innovative Collaboration in Medicine and Law

Deadline: January 2, 2017

The Florida State University Center for Innovative Collaboration in Medicine and Law, based in both the FSU College of Medicine and the FSU College of Law, will present awards for the outstanding… Read More

Mylan’s sudden plans for a generic EpiPen

Modern Healthcare, Vital Signs Blog, August 31, 2016
by Adam Rubenfire, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow alumna)

From the post: Obviously Mylan didn't want to underprice its own branded drug, but it's possible they had filed away plans for a generic version in case a significant competitor arose. Rachel Sachs,… Read More

Is This the Way to Get Rid of the Ridiculous Health Conspiracy Theories?

Politico, August 27, 2016
by Dan Diamond, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

[...] Ethicists point out that a mandatory medical review might not be feasible. While some important jobs—think airline pilot—do require medical approval, it would be harder to make the… Read More

Opinion: Please, Boston Nonprofit Hospitals, Can’t You Join Forces Instead Of Competing?

WBUR, August 11, 2016
by Michael Anne Kyle and Lauren Taylor (Student Fellow alumni)

Here in Boston, cooperation between health care providers is a fraught issue. Competition is fierce among local, not-for-profit teaching hospitals, and the idea of collaboration brings to mind collusion,… Read More

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: 2017 Petrie-Flom Center Annual Conference
Harvard Law School

Deadline: Due no later than December 2, 2016

The Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School is pleased to announce plans for our 2017 annual conference, entitled: “Transparency in Health and… Read More

Bosses in the Bedroom: Religious Employers and the Future of Employer-Sponsored Health Care

Law, Religion, and Health in the United States (Holly Fernandez Lynch, I. Glenn Cohen, Elizabeth Sepper, eds.), forthcoming 2017, Cambridge University Press, 2017 (forthcoming)
by Holly Fernandez Lynch (Executive Director) and Gregory Curfman

Abstract:       This chapter uses the controversy over mandated contraceptive coverage in employer health plans as a jumping-off point to do two things: (1) evaluate the proper… Read More

Bosses in the Bedroom

In Law, Religion, and Health in the United States (Holly Fernandez Lynch, I. Glenn Cohen, Elizabeth Sepper, eds.), forthcoming 2017, Cambridge University Press, Published online July 5, 2016
by Holly Fernandez Lynch (Executive Director) and Gregory Curfman

Abstract: This chapter uses the controversy over mandated contraceptive coverage in employer health plans as a jumping-off point to do two things: (1) evaluate the proper scope of religion in the workplace—not… Read More

Leading Experts Discuss Why the Time Is Right to Transform Advanced Care

Petrie-Flom Center and C-TAC, June 23, 2016

  June 23, 2016—On Tuesday, June 21, The Coalition to Transform Advanced Care (C-TAC), a non-profit organization with a vision of improving advanced illness care for all Americans, and the Petrie-Flom… Read More

Skeptical Worries for ICU Rationing

American Philosophical Association Newsletter on Philosophy and Medicine, Spring 2016, Vol. 15, No. 2
by Luke Gelinas (Clinical Research Ethics Fellow)

From the article: 1. COMPARATIVE BENEFIT/HARM PRINCIPLES IN ICU RATIONING  In what follows I will raise some skeptical concerns for ICU rationing. My basic claim is that deeply entrenched features… Read More

The Relationship Between Bioethics and U.S. Health Law

In The Oxford Handbook of U.S. Healthcare Law, I. Glenn Cohen, Allison K. Hoffman, and William M. Sage, eds., July 2016 (online), January 2017 (print)
by I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

Abstract: This chapter explores the way bioethics is taught as part of U.S. health law. It begins with an overview of changes in several major textbooks in the field that cover bioethics and the law,… Read More

Contrived Threats v. Uncontrived Warnings

83 University of Chicago Law Review 503, 2016
by Einer Elhauge (Founding Faculty Director)

Abstract: Contractual duress, unconstitutional conditions, and blackmail have long been puzzling. The puzzle is why these doctrines sometimes condemn threatening lawful action to induce agreements… Read More

Regulatory Specialist
Partners HealthCare

Deadline: June 05, 2016

As a not-for-profit organization, Partners HealthCare is committed to supporting patient care, research, teaching, and service to the community by leading innovation across our system. Founded by Brigham… Read More

What’s next for opioid legislation?

Politico Pulse, April 22, 2016
by Dan Diamond, referencing Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow)

Excerpt from article: [...] HEALTH WONK RECAP — PULSE flagged a few interesting studies and articles from the week that you may have missed. Using prescription drug insurance as an innovation… Read More

Health Acceleration Challenge
Harvard Business School & Harvard Medical School

Deadline: May 16, 2016

There are few communities of professionals that are as innovative as those in health care. From inventions to processes, procedures to communication, our job is to meet people where they are and provide… Read More

State Health Access Reform Evaluation (SHARE): Call for Proposals
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Deadline: June 1, 2016

Purpose States continue to play a critical role in the implementation of health reform. States have made different choices in the rollout of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), including whether to establish… Read More

J-PAL Health Care Delivery Innovation Competition
MIT

Deadline: June 17, 2016

The J-PAL Health Care Delivery Innovation Competition will support visionary health care leaders in rigorously evaluating programs that deploy health and social services to improve health outcomes and… Read More

Faith charities eye Justice Kennedy in Obamacare birth control fight

The Washington Times, March 21, 2016
by Tom Howell Jr., quoting Holly Fernandez Lynch (Executive Director)

Excerpt from article: [...] The Justice Department argues that a victory for the nonprofits would create a slippery slope. “The precedent that this could set, if the court was to determine that… Read More

Feeling Better: What is the FDA doing, and how is it doing it?

The Weekly Standard, March 21, 2016
by Devorah Goldman, reviewing FDA in the 21st Century by Holly F. Lynch (Executive Director) and I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

Excerpt from the article: [...] In his last State of the Union address, Barack Obama asked, “How do we make technology work for us and not against us?" This was one of Obama's four "big… Read More

Global Ideas for U.S. Solutions
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Deadline: May 31, 2016

Throughout its history, the United States has learned from great ideas from abroad, from bagels to democracy. Why not do the same for health? In that spirit, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) is… Read More

Christians Find Their Own Way to Replace Obamacare

U.S. News & World Report, February 23, 2016
by By Kimberly Leonard, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow)

From the article:  [...] Rachel Sachs, academic fellow at the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology and Bioethics at Harvard Law School, says some academics are concerned that the… Read More

How to Make the Most of Drugs We Already Have

The Upshot, New York Times, February 22, 2016
by By Austin Frakt, citing Ben Roin (Academic Fellow alumnus)

From the article [...] Moreover, if a drug company cannot ascertain the problem for which a prescription is written, it lacks the means by which it can enforce its new patent. Therefore, it cannot recoup,… Read More

A Tool to Help Address Key Ethical Issues in Research

Journal of Medical Ethics Blog, February 22, 2016
by Rebecca H. Li & Holly Fernandez Lynch (Executive Director)

From the article:  One of the most important responsibilities of a clinical project lead at a biotech company or an academic research team is to generate clinical trial protocols. The protocol dictates… Read More

Scalia’s death shakes contraception mandate, other high-profile court cases

Washington Times, February 15, 2016
by Tom Howell Jr., quoting Holly Fernandez Lynch (Executive Director)

[...] Legal analysts it’s not unusual to have different legal treatment from one area to the next. “States do things differently all the time,” said Holly Lynch, a bioethics analyst at… Read More

Does it break the law to charge a lot for a cure?

The Incidental Economist Blog, January 28, 2016
by Nicolas Bagley, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow)

From the article: [...] Talk about sending the wrong signals about what sorts of drugs we value most. As Rachel Sachs wrote in an email: In my view, Sovaldi is a drug that shouldn’t exist… Read More

2016 President’s Challenge
Harvard Innovation Lab

Deadline: February 08, 2016

There are truly important issues facing the world today. The President’s Challenge demonstrates the University’s commitment to using the i-lab as a vehicle for bringing individuals together… Read More

How Prescription Drugs Get So Wildly Expensive

WIRED, September 23, 2015
by Nick Stockton, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow)

From the article: [...] With all that in mind, here’s the important question: Is Shkreli an industry outlier, or was he just unlucky enough to be found out? “There’s one aspect… Read More

Contrived Threats v. Uncontrived Warnings

University of Chicago Law Review, Vol. 83, No. 2 (forthcoming 2016)
by Einer R. Elhauge (Founding Faculty Director)

Abstract:       Contractual duress, unconstitutional conditions, and blackmail have long been puzzling. The puzzle is why these doctrines sometimes condemn threatening lawful… Read More

Health Law Fellow
National Health Law Program, North Carolina Office

Deadline: October 05, 2015

The Position: The National Health Law Program (NHeLP) seeks a full-time health law fellow to be based in the Carrboro, NC office. The fellow will provide general legal and policy support, and will… Read More

Inbound medical tourism to Barbados

BMC Health Services Research, July 2015, Vol. 15
by I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director) et al.

Abstract:  Background Enabled by globalizing processes such as trade liberalization, medical tourism is a practice that involves patients’ intentional travel to privately obtain medical care… Read More

With The ACA Secure, It’s Time To Focus On Social Determinants

Health Affairs Blog, July 21, 2015
by Lauren Taylor (Student Fellow alumna) and Elizabeth Bradley

From the article:  While Medicaid expansion remains a dream for Americans in many states, the integrity of both the state and federal marketplaces for insurance remained intact following the June… Read More

Review of Human Subjects Research Regulation: Perspectives on the Future

IRB: Ethics & Human Research, July-August 2015, Vol. 37, No. 4
by Christine Grady

Christine Grady, MSN, PhD, the chief of the Department of Bioethics in the Clinical Center of the National Institutes of Health, recently published a review of Faculty Director I. Glenn Cohen &… Read More

Religious nonprofits not losing faith after latest failed Obamacare birth control mandate appeal

The Washington Times, July 2, 2015
by Tom Howell Jr., quoting Holly F. Lynch (Executive Director)

From the article:  [...] Wednesday’s opinion against Wheaton came nine days after the Fifth Circuit turned back Baptist universities in Texas who objected to the mandate. “Four circuits… Read More

Happy about the Supreme Court’s ACA decision? Thank a law professor

The Conversation, June 26, 2015
by Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow)

From the post:  The core of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has now survived its second trip to the Supreme Court. Chief Justice John Roberts wrote for the majority in King v Burwell, holding that… Read More

Supreme Court Decision in King v. Burwell (2015)

by Supreme Court of the United States

Read the Supreme Court's 2015 decision upholding the Constitutionality of federal insurance exchanges under the Affordable Care Act. Read More

California’s Obamacare exchange to collect insurance data on patients

LA Times, June 21, 2015
by Chad Terhune, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article: With 1.4 million people enrolled, the state-run marketplace is embarking on an ambitious effort to collect insurance company data on prescriptions, doctor visits and hospital stays for… Read More

Mandatory Process

Indiana Law Journal, Vol. 90, No. 1, 2015
by Matthew J. B. Lawrence (Academic Fellow)

Academic Fellow Matthew J. B. Lawrence has a new article forthcoming in 2015 identifying the justifiable circumstances under which the law can mandate the procedural protections that… Read More

Procedural Triage

Fordham Law Review, Vol. 84, 2015, Forthcoming
by Matthew J. B. Lawrence (Academic Fellow)

Academic Fellow Matthew J. B. Lawrence has a new article forthcoming in 2015 regarding the use of procedural triage in addressing the administrative crisis faced by Medicare. … Read More

Insurer Uses Personal Data To Predict Who Will Get Sick

National Public Radio (NPR), June 8, 2015
by Todd Bookman, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article: [...] Carol, who is sitting next to her husband, explains that John's stroke came in the middle of a bad run of health. First, he [Crockett] developed an ulcer, she says.… Read More

Regulating Bodies Across Borders

Bodies Across Borders: The Global Circulation of Body Parts, Medical Tourists and Professionals (Bronwyn Parry, Beth Greenhough, Tim Brown and Isabel Dyck, eds. Ashgate 2015)
by I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

Faculty Director I. Glenn Cohen has authored a new chapter on medical tourism. Abstract: ‘Medical tourism’ (to use the most common term, though ‘cross-border health care’ or… Read More

Contrived Threats v. Uncontrived Warnings

University of Chicago Law Review, Vol. 83, No. 2, 2016
by Professor Einer Elhauge (Founding Director)

Professor Einer Elhauge has posted an updated version of his article, “Contrived Threats and Uncontrived Warnings,” that (among other things) takes into account the oral argument in King v… Read More

Supreme Court Will Likely Uphold Affordable Care Act, Law Profs Say

Harvard Crimson, March 9, 2015
by Andrew M. Duehren, quoting Einer Elhauge (Faculty Director)

Last week’s oral arguments in King v. Burwell suggest that the United States Supreme Court will uphold the Affordable Care Act, according to several Harvard Law School. The case calls into question… Read More

Opening shots fired in Obamacare Supreme Court battle

The Washington Times, March 3, 2015
by Tom Howell Jr., quoting Matthew Lawrence (Academic Fellow)

From the article: Congressman Paul Ryan and other influential Republicans sketched out plans Tuesday for how they'd deal with a Supreme Court ruling that cancels Obamacare's subsidies in many of… Read More

RWJF Awards for Eliminating Health Disparities: 2015 Call for Applications
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Deadline: April 14, 2015

PurposeThe RWJF Awards for Eliminating Health Disparities program advances RWJF’s vision for building a Culture of Health by recognizing and celebrating individuals who have successfully implemented… Read More

The APHA Public Health Fellowship in Government
American Public Health Association

Deadline: March 09, 2015

The APHA Public Health Fellowship in Government is designed to provide a unique public policy learning experience, to demonstrate the value of science-government interaction, and to make a contribution… Read More

Call for Papers: Health Law Scholars Workshop 2015
The Center for Health Law Studies, Saint Louis University School of Law

Deadline: April 13, 2015

The Health Law Scholars Workshop is a collegial forum in which faculty new to health law and bioethics scholarship present works-in-progress and receive in-depth advice from experienced scholars and teachers… Read More

Third Annual Health Law Year in P/Review collaborative blogging with Health Affairs

Petrie-Flom, February 5, 2015

The Third Annual Health Law Year in P/Review was a big success!  Video will be posted on our website shortly, but our presenters will be posting on their respective topics in a collaborative blog… Read More

Republicans release Obamacare Plan B in case of repeal or court ruling

Washington Times, February 4, 2015
by Tom Howell Jr., quoting Matthew J. B. Lawrence (Academic Fellow)

[...] Matthew Lawrence, who teaches a seminar on Obamacare at Harvard Law School , said the administration’s silence is unsurprising for several reasons. Any planning  may be in its… Read More

Hatch op-ed being used to defend Obamacare in Supreme Court case

Washington Times, January 29, 2015
by Tom Howell Jr.

[...] In cases like these, it is fairly common for interested parties to “use whatever they can to flavor their arguments in the briefs,” said I. Glenn Cohen, a health law expert at Harvard… Read More

2015-2016 Fellowship in Medical Ethics
The Center for Bioethics at Harvard Medical School

Deadline: March 02, 2015

The Center for Bioethics at Harvard Medical School supports research and teaching on ethical issues in medicine, health, and healthcare policy and practice.  The Fellowship in Medical Ethics is open… Read More

Request for Public Commentary on Public Health Emergency Response to Ebola
Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues

Deadline: February 06, 2015

Request for Public Commentary At its meeting on November 6, 2014, the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) began its consideration of the complex ethical landscape… Read More

Health Policy Attorney
Legal Action Center

Deadline: January 21, 2015

The Legal Action Center (LAC) seeks a Health Policy Attorney in its New York office to work on cutting edge legal and policy issues related to health care privacy and access to care, particularly… Read More

Health Journalism 2015: Fellowships
Association of Health Care Journalists

Deadline: March 02, 2015

AHCJ, with the support of several health foundations, is able to offer a number of fellowships to health journalists. The application deadline for the following fellowships is March 2, 2015: Fellowships… Read More

Bioethics Funding Opportunity: Making a Difference in Real-World Bioethics Dilemmas
The Greenwall Foundation

Deadline: January 12, 2015

New Bioethics Program, Spring 2015 Making a Difference in Real-World Bioethics Dilemmas The Greenwall Foundation will fund a bioethics grants program, Making a Difference in Real-World Bioethics Dilemmas to… Read More

No faith in health reform

Crain's: New York Business, November 23, 2014
by Caroline Lewis, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

[...] Under the health-care-sharing ministry model, before coverage kicks in, a household pays a monthly fee that "is matched with another's eligible medical bills," according to Christian Care Ministry's… Read More

Obamacare, back on trial

Harvard Gazette, November 14, 2014
by Christina Pazzanese, interviewing Einer Elhauge (Founding Faculty Director)

From the article: In a move that caught many observers off guard, the U.S. Supreme Court last week announced it would review one of four cases currently challenging provisions of the Patient… Read More

Call for Proposals: Improving Quality & Professionalism of Clinical Ethics Education & Consultation
The Bioethics Program, Union Graduate College

Deadline: November 17, 2014

May 20 - 22, 2015 New York City Why is ICCEC 2015 important?Clinical ethics consultation arose around fifty years ago as a separate voluntary activity on the part of what came to be called “hospital… Read More

2015 California Health Journalism Fellowship
Reporting on Health, University of Southern California

Deadline: December 01, 2014

When: March 1-5, 2015 Where: Los Angeles As its enters its second year, Obamacare promises to continue to be one of the biggest stories for California news media. The USC Annenberg School of Journalism's… Read More

Practice Associate
Medicaid Accountable Care Organization Demonstration Project, Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers

Deadline: December 01, 2014

OverviewThe Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers is a 501c3 that is engaged in a three year Medicaid Accountable Care Organization Demonstration Project. Through the ACO, the Coalition is working to… Read More

HLS Students: Join the American Health Lawyers’ Association

Petrie-Flom Center, September 4, 2014

The Petrie Flom Center and Harvard Law School are proud members of the American Health Lawyers' Association (AHLA) School Alliance program. This program offers a host of benefits, including: Electronic… Read More

UCLA, Harvard Law Schools launch joint annual conference on food law and policy

Harvard Law Today, August 8, 2014

From the article: UCLA School of Law and Harvard Law School have announced the inauguration of the UCLA-Harvard Food Law and Policy Conference, a joint annual conference that will focus on issues in the… Read More

Appeals court upholds Obamacare tax as constitutional

Washington Times, July 29, 2014
by Stephen Dinan and Tom Howell Jr., quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

[...] Legal scholars say origination clause challenges, historically, have been a tough sell in the courts. Indeed, it is “very rarely litigated,” said I. Glenn Cohen, a health expert… Read More

Appeals court upholds Obamacare tax as constitutional

Washington Times, July 29, 2014
by Stephen Dinan and Tom Howell Jr., quoting I. Glenn Cohen

[...] Legal scholars say origination clause challenges, historically, have been a tough sell in the courts. Indeed, it is “very rarely litigated,” said I. Glenn Cohen, a health expert… Read More

D.C. appeals panel deals big blow to Obamacare subsidies

Washington Times, July 22, 2014
by Tom Howell Jr., quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

[...] To redress the potentially fatal blow to its signature law, the administration will likely seek an “en banc” hearing on the case by all the judges in the D.C. Circuit. That… Read More

After Hobby Lobby, ACA exceptions may become the rule

Reuters, July 15, 2014
by Interview with Holly Fernandez Lynch (Executive Director)

Holly Fernandez Lynch analyzes the impact of the Supreme Court's recent decision, saying the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA), passed by Congress, will shape the impact as much as the court… Read More

Some Insurance Companies Ask Their Customers to Cross the Border for Care

New Republic, July 7, 2014
by Adam Teicholz and I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director) and

Faculty Director I. Glenn Cohen has co-authored a new piece in New Republic on the practice adopted by some insurance companies of sending clients across the border for less expensive care. From… Read More

When Religious Freedom Clashes with Access to Care

NEJM, July 2, 2014
by I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director), Holly Fernandez Lynch (Executive Director), Gregory Curfman

At the tail end of this year's Supreme Court term, religious freedom came into sharp conflict with the government's interest in providing affordable access to health care. In a consolidated opinion… Read More

Hobby Lobby stunner

Washington Times, June 30, 2014
by Tom Howell Jr., quoting Holly Fernandez Lynch (Executive Director)

[...] Holly Lynch, a health and ethics expert at Harvard Law School, said she was “not surprised in the least that contraceptives in particular were not covered directly in the ACA.” “It… Read More

Supreme Court Decision in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby

by Supreme Court of the United States

Read the Supreme Court's decision in favor of the right of the owners of "closely-held for-profit corporations" to refuse to provide insurance coverage for contraception and contraceptive devices… Read More

Summer Program in US Health Reform
O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law, Georgetown University

Deadline: July 21 - 25, 2014

Important DatesRegular Application Deadline: June 15 Program DetailsProgram FeesRegular AttendeesMiddle/Low-income Countries: $1,825 ($3,150) High-income Countries: $2,500 ($4,485)… Read More

Choosing not to choose

Harvard Law Today, June 18, 2014

Harvard Law Today featured Cass Sunstein's keynote address at the 2014 Petrie-Flom Center Annual Conference, "Behavioral Economics, Law, and Health Policy." Sunstein, who is the Robert Walmsley University… Read More

Accountability in the ACO Structure

Risk & Insurance, April 2014
by Katie Siegel

[...] As physician employers, ACOs “will need professional liability coverage for the errors of its professional care providers,” said Derek Jones, a principal and consulting actuary at Milliman.… Read More

Many states avoiding paying for glitchy health care sites

Washington Times, April 15, 2014
by Tom Howell Jr., quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Co-Director)

“I think these will be handled as is most government contracting: threats of litigation or excluding the contractors, followed by real negotiations and agreements,” said I. Glenn Cohen, a health… Read More

EdX Course:

EdX, Course began April 7, 2014
by John E. McDonough, DrPH, MPA

This online course provides a basic and thorough understanding of the U.S. health care system focusing on access, quality of care, and costs. Read More

Few will use Obamacare hardship exemption, analysts say

Washington Times, March 23, 2014
by Jacqueline Klimas, quoting Matthew J. B. Lawrence (Academic Fellow)

[...] “When you have a very vague term like this exemption 14, the devil could be in the details on how it is implemented,” Mr. Lawrence said. “But that is one place where a different… Read More

States seek wiggle room on Obamacare deadline

Washington Times, March 19, 2014
by Tom Howell Jr., quoting Matthew J. B. Lawrence (Academic Fellow)

[...] “The deadline is March 31,” a Health and Human Services Department spokeswoman said. But Matthew Lawrence, a fellow at Harvard Law School, said it’s no surprise the administration is… Read More

Everything You Need to Know about the Healthcare Contraception Mandate

Shape, March 17, 2014
by Cristina Goyanes, interview with Holly Lynch (Petrie-Flom Executive Director)

[...] Starting March 25, the U.S. Supreme Court will begin hearing religious disputes over the contraception mandate, which requires employer health insurance coverage of contraceptive methods (without… Read More

Was the Medicaid Expansion Coercive?

Routledge, 2014
by I. Glenn Cohen (Petrie-Flom Faculty Co-Director)

In The Affordable Care Act Decision: Philosophical and Legal Implications, Fritz Allhoff and Mark Hall, eds. In this book chapter on the ACA decision, NFIB v. Sebelius, I focus on the Court's… Read More

Obama’s executive actions can backfire on Democrats if GOP takes the White House

The Washington Times, February 16, 2014
by Tom Howell Jr., quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Petrie-Flom Faculty Co-Director)

[...] Although he is taking advantage of discretion built into the Affordable Care Act of 2010, those executive powers also would give “a future President Rand [Paul] or other ACA opponent… Read More

Religious groups to back Obamacare contraceptive mandate

Washington Post, February 4, 2014
by Tom Howell, Jr. quoting Holly Fernandez Lynch (Petrie-Flom Executive Director)

[...] In its filing, the AJC said the case presents a rare instance in which they see a clash between religious liberty and the equal rights of women. They said the government’s mandate… Read More

Too good to be true?

NBC News, February 3, 2014
by Zac Bissonnette, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Petrie-Flom Faculty Co-Director)

[...] The ministries are not regulated for solvency, said I. Glenn Cohen, a professor at Harvard Law School and co-director of the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology and Bioethics.… Read More

Supreme Court Position on Obamacare Birth Control Mandate a Tough Call

Washington Times, December 25, 2013
by Tom Howell, Jr., quoting Holly Fernandez Lynch

[...] "It also probably will not matter that three of the court’s justices - Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan - are female, even if the case involves… Read More

Supreme Court to decide Obamacare birth control mandate

Washington Times, November 26, 2013
by Tom Howell Jr., quoting Holly Fernandez Lynch

[...] Ms. Lynch said the outcome is a particularly hard one to predict. But she thinks the court will dispense with the constitutional claims and focus more heavily on religious-freedom protection… Read More

White House won’t rule out delay of Obamacare; buyers wait for website fix

The Washington Times, October 22, 2013
by Ben Wolfgang and Tom Howell, Jr., quoting Holly Fernandez Lynch

[...] Others said it’s too early to sound the alarm. “For people who must rely on the federal exchange, there are still 160 days before the end of open enrollment, which seems to be more than… Read More

Obamacare becomes test of faith for employer over birth control

The Washington Times, October 14, 2013
by Tom Howell, Jr. quoting Holly Fernandez Lynch

[...]  The battle lines are drawn, but analysts of all stripes agree the case is on the fast-track for the highest court in the land. “I think it’s a foregone conclusion the Supreme… Read More

Video Now Available: Symposium Honoring Founding Faculty Director Einer Elhauge

Tulsa Law Review, October 4, 2013

On Friday, October 4, the Tulsa Law Review hosted a symposium titled "Health Law Policy: Legal Issues in the Evolving Healthcare Market" honoring the work of Petrie-Flom Center Founding… Read More