2018-2019 Petrie-Flom Center Student Fellowship
Harvard Law School

Deadline: August 10, 2018

The Center and Student FellowshipThe Petrie-Flom Center Student Fellowship Program is designed to mentor students seeking to become thought leaders in health law policy and bioethics. The fellowship supports… Read More

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS! 2018-2019 Petrie-Flom Center Student Fellowship

Petrie-Flom Center, Harvard Law School, August 10, 2018

What do a MacArthur Genius award winner, several health law professors at top schools, executive directors of leading health law centers, an associate chief counsel of the FDA, and partners and… Read More

2017-2018 Petrie-Flom Center Student Fellowship
Harvard Law School

Deadline: August 11, 2017

The deadline for applications for the 2017-2018 fellowship is now closed.  The Center and Student Fellowship.The Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics is an interdisciplinary… Read More

Regulation of Stem Cell Therapy Travel

Current Stem Cell Reports, July, 2018
by I. Glenn Cohen and Shelly Simana

From the abstract: Purpose of Review Stem cell therapies (hereinafter: SCT) hold tremendous promise for the treatment of a variety of diseases. Yet, alongside the medical potential, they pose significant… Read More

Despite The End Of China’s One-Child Policy, Births Are Still Lagging

NPR, July 16, 2018
by Scott Neuman and Rob Schmitz

Two years after China officially ended its one-child policy in order to counter the country's aging society and shrinking workforce, Chinese couples are not having babies fast enough. In 2017, there… Read More

State abortion ballots prepare for post-Roe world

Politico, July 15, 2018
by Jennifer Haberkorn and Rachana Pradhan

Anti-abortion initiatives on the ballot in West Virginia and Alabama this November could lay the foundation for the states to ban or sharply limit legal abortion as change comes to the Supreme Court. Both… Read More

7,000 people fail to meet Arkansas Medicaid work requirement

AP, July 13, 2018
by Andrew DeMillo

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — More than 7,000 people on Arkansas’ Medicaid expansion didn’t meet a requirement that they report at least 80 hours of work in June and face the threat of losing… Read More

Drug wholesalers sue New York over an opioid stewardship program

STAT, July 12, 2018
by Ed Silverman

A trade group for pharmaceutical wholesalers filed a lawsuit claiming a New York state law that requires opioid makers and distributors to fund a first-in-the-nation program for covering costs for treatment,… Read More

Don’t Expect Brett Kavanaugh To Protect The Affordable Care Act

WBUR Cognoscenti, July 12, 2018
by Carmel Shachar

From the article:  Thanks to Brett Kavanaugh’s 12 years as a judge on the D.C. Court of Appeals, we have a well-developed record of the Supreme Court nominee’s positions on key… Read More

Health Care A Talking Point In Democrats’ Kavanaugh Strategy.

Kaiser Health News, July 12, 2018

KHN Morning Briefing: Summaries of health policy coverage from major news organizations Where as the GOP has picked one message to focus on for the Supreme Court nomination battle -- Brett Kavanaugh's… Read More

Bucking Trump, Health Insurers Expand Obamacare Footprints

Forbes, July 12, 2018
by Bruce Japsen

Undaunted by the latest attacks on Obamacare – both verbal and financial from the Trump administration – health insurance companies are forging ahead with expansion plans in the business of… Read More

House GOP appropriators block funding for gun violence research

Politico, July 11, 2018
by Adam Cancryn

House Republican appropriators Wednesday rejected a proposal to designate millions of dollars for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for gun violence research, voting 32-20 to keep the language… Read More

GOP State Senators Sue To Stop Nebraska Voters From Deciding Medicaid Expansion

Forbes, July 10, 2018
by Bruce Japsen

Two Nebraska Republican legislators have filed a lawsuit in an attempt to stop voters in the state from putting a Medicaid expansion initiative on the November general election ballot, questioning… Read More

U.S. Opposition to Breast-Feeding Resolution Stuns World Health Officials

New York Times, July 8, 2018
by Andrew Jacobs

A resolution to encourage breast-feeding was expected to be approved quickly and easily by the hundreds of government delegates who gathered this spring in Geneva for the United Nations-affiliated World… Read More

‘It’s Almost Like a Ghost Town.’ Most Nursing Homes Overstated Staffing for Years

New York Times, July 7, 2018
by Jordan Rau

ITHACA, N.Y. — Most nursing homes had fewer nurses and caretaking staff than they had reported to the government for years, according to new federal data, bolstering the long-held suspicions of many… Read More

Legislative Attorney (Health Law)
Congressional Research Service (CRS), American Law Division (ALD)

Deadline: Open until filled.

General DescriptionThe Congressional Research Service (CRS), American Law Division (ALD), seeks a Legislative Attorney to analyze legal questions that emerge from the work of Congress related to health… Read More

Medical Legal Partnership Research Associate
Solomon Center for Health Law and Policy at Yale Law School

Deadline: Open until filled.

General DescriptionThe Solomon Center for Health Law and Policy at Yale Law School seeks applications for a quantitative research associate to contribute to a critical gap in the legal and biomedical scholarly… Read More

Proof of Children’s Vaccinations? Italy Will Now Take Parents’ Word for It

New York Times, July 5, 2018
by Gaia Pianigiani

ROME — Italian parents will no longer have to provide state-run schools with a doctor’s note to show that their children have been vaccinated, the country’s new populist government announced… Read More

When Health Insurance Prices Rose Last Year, Around a Million Americans Dropped Coverage

New York Times, July 3, 2018
by Margot Sanger-Katz

Last year, as insurance prices rose by an average of just over 20 percent around the country, people who qualified for Obamacare subsidies hung onto their insurance. But the increases appear to have been… Read More

Call for Proposals Enforcement, Litigation, and Compliance Conference
Food and Drug Law Institute

Deadline: August 09, 2018

The annual Enforcement, Litigation, and Compliance Conference brings together industry, regulators, attorneys, litigators, academics, and consultants to discuss trends and issues in enforcement and compliance,… Read More

Justices Back Pregnancy Centers That Oppose Abortion, in Free Speech Case

New York Times, June 26, 2018
by Adam Liptak

WASHINGTON — A state law requiring “crisis pregnancy centers” to supply women with information about abortion likely violates the First Amendment, the Supreme Court ruled Tuesday in blocking… Read More

Fearing Deportation, Immigrant Parents Are Opting Out Of Health Benefits For Kids

Kaiser Health News, June 25, 2018
by Ashley Lopez, KUT

The fear of family separation is nothing new for many immigrants already living in the U.S. In fact, that fear, heightened in recent weeks, has been forcing a tough decision for a while. Advocates say… Read More

House overwhelmingly passes final opioid package

Politico, June 25, 2018
by Brianna Ehley

The House on Friday overwhelmingly passed sweeping bipartisan opioid legislation, concluding the chamber’s two-week voteathon on dozens of bills to address the drug abuse epidemic. The measure combines… Read More

White House proposes a narrowing of FDA’s mission — and a new name

STAT, June 21, 2018
by Ike Swetlitz

WASHINGTON — The Trump administration has proposed a fundamental change to the mission of the Food and Drug Administration, one that would transfer most of the responsibility for regulating food… Read More

Canada’s Legislature Votes To Legalize Marijuana; Sales Will Begin In Weeks

NPR, June 19, 2018
by Bill Chappell

Recreational marijuana may soon be legal in Canada, after both the House of Commons and the Senate approved the Cannabis Act. Legal sales are likely to begin before the end of summer after the Senate voted… Read More

IRB Oversight of Patient-Centered Outcomes Research: A National Survey of IRB Chairpersons

Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics, June 14, 2018
by Joel S. Weissman, Eric G. Campbell, I. Glenn Cohen, Holly Fernandez Lynch, Emily A. Largent, Avni Gupta, Ronen Rozenblum, Melissa Abraham, Karen Spike

From the abstract:  Patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR) is becoming increasingly common. However, there is little evidence regarding what novel ethical challenges, if any, are posed by PCOR… Read More

As Medicaid Costs Soar, States Try A New Approach

Kaiser Health News, June 15, 2018
by Phil Galewitz

[...] state officials say Medicaid is busting Minnesota’s budget, particularly with patients like Dowland and its system of paying hospitals for each admission, ER visit and outpatient test.… Read More

Dozens of abortion curbs challenged in lawsuit by Texas clinic

Politico, June 14, 2018
by Renuka Rayasam and Jennifer Haberkorn

AUSTIN, Texas — A group of Texas abortion clinics and nonprofits filed a sweeping lawsuit against the state Thursday challenging dozens of abortion laws, some of which were passed at least two decades… Read More

The New Obamacare Lawsuit Could Undo Far More Than Protections for Pre-existing Conditions

New York Times, June 12, 2018
by Margot Sanger-Katz

A new Trump administration court challenge is explicitly aiming to remove a central promise of Obamacare — its protections for people with pre-existing health conditions. But… Read More

Building Capacity for a Global Genome Editing Observatory: Institutional Design

Trends in Biotechnology, June, 2018
by Krishanu Saha, J. Benjamin Hurlbut,Sheila Jasanoff,Aziza Ahmed, Anthony Appiah, Elizabeth Bartholet [...] I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)[...]

Complete author list: Krishanu Saha, J. Benjamin Hurlbut, Sheila Jasanoff, Aziza Ahmed, Anthony Appiah, Elizabeth Bartholet,  Françoise Baylis, Gaymon Bennett, George Church, I. Glenn Cohen, George… Read More

On the Human Right to Health

Human Rights, Democracy, and Legitimacy in a World of Disorder , 2018
by I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

Faculty Director I. Glenn Cohen has written a chapter in the fortchoming book "Human Rights, Democracy, and Legitimacy in a World of Disorder," (Cambridge University Press, edited by Silja… Read More

Precision Medicines Approved More Quickly, With Less Data

MedPage Today, May 25, 2018
by Shannon Firth, quoting Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: Pivotal trials for precision medicines were scarcer, less likely to be controlled or blinded, and had fewer participants than those for other agents, the study found.  The less rigorous… Read More

JAMA Forum: The Risks and Benefits of Expedited Drug Reviews

JAMA Forum, May 23, 2018
by Austin Frakt, citing paper co-authored by Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) oversees several programs that expedite approval of certain drugs that treat serious conditions and address unmet medical needs. On average,… Read More

Health Insurance’s Secondary Cost Problem

Harvard Law & Policy Review, Forthcoming
by Matthew J.B. Lawrence (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the abstract: This Article identifies a fundamental problem with health insurance and, so, contemporary American health care. While competition pushes health insurers to minimize the primary costs… Read More

Trump unveils plan to cut drug prices

The Lancet, June 2, 2018, vol. 391, no. 10136
by Susan Jaffe, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: A trade association that represents PBMs disagrees. Eliminating rebates would leave patients and insurers “at the mercy of drug manufacturer pricing strategies”, according… Read More

Is Trump giving the EU higher drug prices too?

DW, June 1, 2018
by Lindsey Rae Gjording, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Through single-payer health care systems the EU is able to regulate consumer costs at reasonable levels. It also makes decisions about what new drugs are worth spending taxpayer money… Read More

Trump Wants Medicaid to Push for Lower Drug Prices – But Will Patients Be Hurt?

PEW, May 30, 2018
by Michael Ollove, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: While 74 percent of closed formularies result in lower prices, 21 percent result in price increases, a 2016 report in the American Journal of Managed Care found. And 29… Read More

Vermont legislators pass a drug importation law. So what?

Salon, May 27, 2018
by Shefali Luthra, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Importation backers — including the National Academy for State Health Policy (NASHP), which helped craft Vermont’s bill and has worked with state lawmakers — hope he’ll… Read More

Hundreds of Illinois Children Languish in Psychiatric Hospitals After They’re Cleared For Release

ProPublica (Co-published with The Atlantic), June 5, 2018
by Duaa Eldeib

Doctors had agreed Brasfield was ready to be discharged about six weeks after he arrived, but the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services, which is his legal guardian, couldn’t find anywhere… Read More

Judge Tells Maine It Must Implement Voter-Approved Medicaid Expansion…

Kaiser Health News, June 5, 2018

Judge Tells Maine It Must Implement Voter-Approved Medicaid Expansion That Governor Has Been Stonewalling HN Morning Briefing: Summaries of health policy coverage from major news organizations Maine… Read More

Criticism of ‘right to try’ law for experimental drugs after it passes in US

Chemistry World, June 5, 2018
by Anthony King, quoting Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the article:  The US government has controversially announced that it will allow unapproved, experimental drugs to be given to terminally ill patients. The ‘right to try’ law passed… Read More

Gun Studies

NPR, June 4, 2018
by Martin Kaste

In the wake of the Parkland high school massacre, there's been renewed interest in "red flag" laws, which allow courts and police to temporarily remove guns from people perceived to pose a threat.… Read More

She Went to Jail for a Drug Relapse.

New York Times, June 4, 2018
by Jan Hoffman

[...] Should an addict’s relapse be punished with a criminal sanction? Ms. Eldred has put that question before the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court, in a case that may have widespread ripples,… Read More

Pro-life groups cheer Supreme Court’s refusal to hear medication-induced abortion ban in Arkansas

The Washington Times, May 29, 2018
by Alex Swoyer, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article: Planned Parenthood of Arkansas and Eastern Oklahoma sued, arguing the law would halt operations at two of the state’s remaining three abortion clinics. The organization said that… Read More

Facebook’s Health Groups Offer A Lifeline, But Privacy Concerns Linger

Huffington Post, May 28, 2018
by Sarah Elizabeth Richards, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article: It’s impossible to expect a true sense of privacy among 55,000 people, but users and bioethicists alike have lingering questions about Facebook’s use of data. “How much… Read More

When Scientists Develop Products From Personal Medical Data, Who Gets To Profit?

NPR, May 31, 2018
by Richard Harris

If you go to the hospital for medical treatment and scientists there decide to use your medical information to create a commercial product, are you owed anything as part of the bargain? That's one… Read More

Another Cause Of Doctor Burnout

Kaiser Health News, May 31, 2018
by Jake Harper, WFYI

[...] There are an estimated 6,500 undocumented immigrants in the U.S. with end-stage kidney disease. Many of them can’t afford private insurance and are barred from Medicare or Medicaid. Treatment… Read More

After Years of Trying, Virginia Finally Will Expand Medicaid

New York Times, May 30, 2018
by Abby Goodnough

WASHINGTON — Virginia’s Republican-controlled Senate voted on Wednesday to open Medicaid to an additional 400,000 low-income adults next year, making it all but certain that the state will… Read More

Ireland votes resoundingly to repeal abortion ban

CNN, May 26, 2018
by Kara Fox and Dakin Andone

Dublin, Ireland (CNN)Ireland has voted an emphatic "Yes" to amend the country's constitution to enable legislation that would allow women to have an abortion in a historic and emotionally charged referendum.… Read More

HIPAA and Protecting Health Information in the 21st Century

JAMA, May 24, 2018
by I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director) and Michelle M. Mello

Faculty Director I. Glenn Cohen has co-authored a new opinion piece in JAMA that addresses the adequacy of HIPAA in protecting electronic health data in light of the launch of the Trump administration's… Read More

Uninsured Rate Remains Basically Flat Despite Republicans’ Attempts To Chip Away At Health Law

Kaiser Health News, May 22, 2018

KHN Morning Briefing: Summaries of health policy coverage from major news organizations The numbers from the government survey suggest a surprising resilience of the health law and its expansion of… Read More

Call for Proposals
Policies for Action: Policy and Law Research to Build a Culture of Health

Deadline: June 07, 2018 3:00 PM

General DescriptionApproximately $2.0 million will be awarded through P4A's 2018 CFP, which includes approximately $1,550,000 total for the general CFP, and $450,000 set aside for pre-emption-focused… Read More

Center for Public Health Law Research Fellow
Center for Public Health Law Research, Temple University

Deadline: Open until filled.

General DescriptionThe Center for Public Health Law Research (CPHLR) supports the widespread adoption of scientific tools and methods for mapping and evaluating the impact of law on health. The Center… Read More

HHS Secretary Clarifies Trump Administration’s Plan To Reduce Prescription Drug Prices

NPR, May 17, 2018
by Alison Kodjak

[...] KELLY: First start just by reminding us what this proposal is. The president came out and made an announcement about drug prices last Friday in the Rose Garden. What exactly did he say? KODJAK:… Read More

F.D.A. Names and Shames Drug Makers to Encourage Generic Competition

New York Times, May 17, 2018
by Sheila Kaplan

Pharmaceutical companies that spend billions of dollars to develop new drugs do not want competitors to profit from inexpensive generic copies of blockbuster medicines. To avoid rivals, they fight for… Read More

Judge Overturns Assisted Suicide Law In California

NPR, May 16, 2018
by Scott Neuman

A California law permitting physicians to prescribe life-ending drugs to terminally ill patients has been overturned by a judge who says it was passed unconstitutionally. Judge Daniel Ottolia of the Riverside… Read More

Do NFL Safety Concerns Mean Regulators Should Get in the Game?

Bloomberg Environment, April 26, 2018
by Fatima Hussein, featuring report by the Law and Ethics Initiative of the Football Players Health Study at Harvard University

From the article: Concussions involving NFL players have been an increasing worry. Now a debate has resurfaced about whether federal safety regulators should be able to fine teams found guilty of inflicting… Read More

The Ethics of Medicaid’s Work Requirements and Other Personal Responsibility Policies

JAMA, May 7, 2018
by Harald Schmidt and Allison K. Hoffman (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the paper:  Breaking controversial new ground, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) recently invited states to consider establishing work requirements as a condition of receiving… Read More

Grants

Berkeley Technology Law Journal, May 10, 2018
by W. Nicholson Price II (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the paper: Innovation is a primary source of economic growth, and is accordingly the target of substantial academic and government attention. Grants are a key tool in the government’s arsenal… Read More

Drug made famous by Shkreli’s 5,000% price hike is still $750 a pill

Ars Technica, May 4, 2018
by Beth Mole, quoting W. Nicholson Price II (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: Disgraced ex-pharmaceutical executive and hedge fund manager Martin Shkreli is now behind bars, facing a seven-year prison sentence for securities fraud. Yet the drug-price hike… Read More

For Shame: ‘Pharma Bro’ Shkreli Is In Prison, But Daraprim’s Price Is Still High

Washington Post, May 4, 2018
by Shefali Luthra, quoting W. Nicholson Price II (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: The continued high price of the drug is a cautionary tale to those who hope that public shaming of a few “bad actors” can curb escalating drug prices, because the problem… Read More

Work Requirements Give Republicans Cover to Expand Medicaid

U.S. News, April 23, 2018
by Gabrielle Levy, quoting Allison K. Hoffman (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: While the Medicaid law sets certain mandatory minimums of eligibility and coverage, the waiver program allows states wide latitude to run their programs as they see fit. For state Republican… Read More

HealthAffairs Podcast: Precision Medicine

Health Affairs Podcast, May 8, 2018
by Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus), Alan Weil, Geoffrey Ginsburg, Alessandro Blasimme, Kathryn A. Phillips, Daryl Pritchard,

Overview of the Podcast: The May 2018 issue of Health Affairs on "Precision Medicine," contains a timely and comprehensive look at the use of data and genetic information to better diagnose and treat patients.… Read More

Planned Parenthood sues Trump administration over federal funding

The Washington Times, May 2, 2018
by Alex Swoyer, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article: Three Planned Parenthood affiliates sued Wednesday to demand taxpayer money keep flowing to the country’s largest abortion network, saying a new Trump administration policy… Read More

For Shame: ‘Pharma Bro’ Shkreli Is In Prison, But Daraprim’s Price Is Still High

The Washington Post , May 4, 2018
by Shefali Luthra, quoting W. Nicholson Price (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: It was 2015 when Martin Shkreli, then CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals and the notorious “pharma bro,” jacked up the cost of the lifesaving drug Daraprim by 5,000 percent. Overnight,… Read More

Addressing Financial Barriers to Enrollment in Clinical Trials

JAMA Oncology, April 19, 2018
by Emily A. Largent and Holly Fernandez Lynch (Former Executive Director)

From the article: Shortfalls in clinical trial recruitment and retention constitute a major obstacle to scientific advancement. One means of increasing patient participation rates is to reduce associated… Read More

The FDA Breakthrough-Drug Designation — Four Years of Experience

The New England Journal of Medicine, April 12, 2018
by Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus), Jerry Avorn, and Aaron S. Kesselheim,

This article is behind a paywall. Harvard affiliates can access the full text via Hollis +. From the article: In 2012, Congress created the “breakthrough therapy” designation to expedite Food… Read More

THE PRICE OF VACCINES MUST BE DISCLOSED, ORDERS A COURT

La Presse, April 19, 2018
by Marie-Claude Malboeuf, Suit brought by Jean-Christophe Belisle Pipon (Visiting Researcher)

From the article: Pharmaceutical companies doing business with the government will no longer be able to hide how much money they are getting to provide vaccines. This is what the Commission for Access… Read More

Move over right-to-try: FDA looks at improving clinical trial enrollment

Politico, April 16, 2018
by Sarah Karlin-Smith, quoting Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: The FDA’s bar for “breakthrough” designation may be too low, Harvard Medical School policy researchers argue in the New England Journal of Medicine. The designation… Read More

New Article Examines the Possibility of Applying Workplace Safety Rules to the NFL

Part of the Law and Ethics Initiative of the Football Players Health Study at Harvard University, April 17, 2018
by Article authored by Adam M. Finkel, Chris Deubert, Orly Lobel, I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director), and Holly Fernandez Lynch (Former Executive Director

Could occupational health and safety laws be applied to better protect NFL players? A new analysis, published on April 17 in the Arizona Law Review, explores this very possibility. The article, written… Read More

Is the ‘Breakthrough Therapy’ Process Putting Dangerous Drugs on Store Shelves?

Healthline, April 17, 2018
by Shawn Radcliffe, quoting Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: A CNN report last week detailed the deaths of more than 700 patients prescribed an antipsychotic therapy drug for Parkinson’s disease. The Food and Drug Administration… Read More

Is FDA breakthrough therapy really valuable?

Genet, April 13, 2018
by Liu Xuan Tong, quoting Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: In the recent New England Journal of Medicine, articles published by Harvard University's Jonathan Darrow, Jerry Avorn, and Aaron Kesselheim point out many of the issues arising from… Read More

When ‘Breakthrough’ Drugs Aren’t Actually Breakthroughs: FDA’s Approval Pathway Can Be Misleading

Kaiser Health News, April 12, 2018
by KHN Morning Briefing, quoting Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: In a review of three years of drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration under a “breakthrough therapy” pathway, researchers argue that some of the compounds are not… Read More

Does the FDA’s ‘breakthrough’ drug program need to be reformed? Harvard skeptics say yes

Endpoint News, April 12, 2018
by John Carroll, quoting Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: Of all the expedited review programs that the FDA has set up, none are as popular as the “breakthrough” therapy designation. And a group of high-profile skeptics says that… Read More

Senior Fellow, Solomon Center for Health Law and Policy
Yale Law School

Deadline: April 15, 2018

General Description: Solomon Center for Health Law and Policy at Yale Law School is seeking to hire a recent J.D. to serve as a Senior Fellow for the center beginning in the summer… Read More

Why Scott Gottlieb is the one Trump official everybody seems to like

Vox, April 11, 2018
by Julia Belluz, German Lopez, and Dylan Scott , quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: When Scott Gottlieb was appointed commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration last May, some were concerned he’d be a shill for the pharmaceutical industry.… Read More

FDA-designated ‘breakthrough’ therapies may not actually be scientific breakthroughs

Stat, April 11, 2018
by Ike Swetlitz, quoting Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: WASHINGTON — In a review of three years of drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration under a “breakthrough therapy” pathway, researchers argue that some of… Read More

US FDA’s Breakthrough Program Needs Higher Standard For Comparators, NEJM Says

Pink Sheet, April 11, 2018
by Michael Cipriano, quoting Jonathan Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

This article is behind a paywall. Readers will have to pay for full access to the article.  Executive Summary Harvard Medical School researchers call for inclusion of off-label drugs, accelerated… Read More

Utah’s quixotic Medicaid expansion plan, explained

Vox, April 2, 2018
by Dylan Scott, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Utah wants to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. Kind of. The state legislature has passed and Gov. Gary Herbert has signed a bill that would partially expand… Read More

Healthcare Accreditation Driving Patient Excellence in Europe

by Medical Tourism Magazine, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article: In the business of medical travel, quality drives the market and the quality of healthcare a hospital or healthcare organization provides is often validated by its accreditation status.… Read More

On Scarcity and the Value of Clinical Trials

The American Journal of Bioethics, 2018, Issue 4, Volume 18
by Luke Gelinas (Senior Researcher), Holly Fernandez Lynch (Former Executive Director), Barbara E. Bierer, & I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the artice: Allocation of scarce goods and resources is a common concern in the health care context, from intensive care unit (ICU) beds, to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) machines, to… Read More

Mutual Obligations in Research and Withholding Payment From Deceptive Participants

The American Journal of Bioethics, 2018, Issue 4, Volume 18
by Holly Fernandez Lynch (Former Executive Director), Luke Gelinas (Senior Researcher), & Emily A. Largent

From the article: Paying research participants can be ethically charged, both when payment is offered and—as demonstrated in this case—when it is withheld. When individuals undergoing screening… Read More

Assisted Reproduction in Israel: Law, Religion, and Culture

Brill Research Perspectives, March 20, 2018
by Avishalom Westreich

From the article: The theme of this composition is the right to procreate in the Israeli context. Our discussion of this right includes the implementation of the right to procreate, restrictions on the… Read More

The Work of the Supreme Court

Hosted by the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School, April 11, 2018

PLEASE NOTE: A Harvard ID is required in order to attend this event.  Harvard affiliates: RSVP now! Read More

Prevalence of Publicly Available Expanded Access Policies

Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics, March 23, 2018
by Emily Jung (Petrie-Flom Student Intern), Patricia J. Zettler, Aaron S. Kesselheim

From the Article: The Food and Drug Administration's expanded access program allows patients with serious or immediately life‐threatening conditions to seek access to experimental drugs and treatments… Read More

Between the lines on insurers and drug rebates

Axios Vitals, March 28, 2018
by Sam Baker, citing Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: UnitedHealthcare and Aetna have committed to lowering some consumers' out-of-pocket drug costs by sharing the rebates that pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs) negotiate with… Read More

Price Insensitivity. Guest, Rachel Sachs

The Week in Health Law, Episode 132, March 22, 2018
by Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale, interviewing Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the podcast: This week’s episode features a welcome return from Rachel Sachs, Associate Professor of Law at the Washington University in St. Louis School of Law. Rachel’s primary… Read More

It’s hard to be economically rational when you’re sick

The Hill, March 21, 2018
by Christopher T. Robertson (Academic Fellow alumnus) and Victor Laurion

From the article: We may be in the early days of a changing political ideology. For decades, politicians on both sides have espoused the belief that copayments and other out-of-pocket charges are necessary… Read More

House passes right-to-try on second try

Politico, March 21, 2018
by Sarah Karlin-Smith, quoting Christopher T. Robertson (Academic Fellow alumnus)

From the Article: The House of Representatives passed on party lines Wednesday evening a bill designed to let very sick patients request access to experimental medicines without government oversight. The… Read More

Call for Papers: Wiet Life Sciences Scholars Conference
Loyola University, Beazley Institute for Health Law and Policy

Deadline: May 15, 2018

General Description: Loyola University Chicago’s nationally acclaimed Beazley Institute for Health Law and Policy is pleased to invite original research submissions for the annual Wiet Life… Read More

Fulbright Visiting Research Chair in Health Law, Policy and Ethics
University of Ottawa Center for Health Law, Policy and Ethics

Deadline: August 01, 2018

General Description: Breakthroughs in health sciences offer tremendous hope to patients and the public, but with progress emerge new legal and ethical challenges. This position allows a scholar to… Read More

National Institutes of Health IRB Internship Program Fall 2018
University of Bergen

Deadline: April 22, 2018

General Description:Members of Institutional Review Boards (IRBs), IRB administrators, research ethics committees, tribal governance bodies, and others who are currently employed in positions related to… Read More

Harvard Law School Program of Study: Law, Science, & Technology Student Advisory Lunch

by Moderated by Carmel Shachar (Executive Director)

Thursday March 22, 201812:00-1:00pmLangdell 225 North classroom, Harvard Law School  This advisory lunch will provide information about courses and experiential opportunities for students interested… Read More

General Attorney, Executive Office of the President
Office of Management and Budget, Washington DC

Deadline: March 23, 2018

General Description The general counsel's office is small, consisting of approximately 15 attorneys, who regularly meet with and advise policy officials in the White House, OMB itself, and other… Read More

Brain Scans in the Courts: Prosecutor’s Dream or Civil Rights Nightmare?

Inside Science, March 14, 2018
by James Gaines, quoting Francis Shen (Senior Fellow in Law and Applied Neuroscience)

From the article:  One of the foundations of the U.S. legal system is the Bill of Rights, which enshrines the idea that there are certain individual liberties and inalienable freedoms that governments… Read More

Nicotine and Ethics: 2018 Brocher Summer Academy in Population-level Bioethics
Brocher Foundation, Hermance, Switzerland

Deadline: March 31, 2018

General Description:The Brocher Foundation invites junior faculty, post-docs, advanced graduate students, clinicians and other practitioners to apply for inclusion in the 2018 Brocher Summer Academy in… Read More

Risk and Resilience in Health Data Infrastructure

Colorado Technology Law Journal, Volume 16, Issue 1 (2017)
by W. Nicholson Price II (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the journal article: Today’s health system runs on data. However, for a system that generates and requires so much data, the health care system is surprisingly bad at maintaining, connecting,… Read More

Lawmakers file a bill to block maneuvers like Allergan’s patent deal with Mohawks

STAT, March 7, 2018
by Ed Silverman quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Angered by a controversial Allergan (AGN1 ) patent maneuver, a handful of lawmakers introduced a bill that would prohibit tribal sovereign immunity from being used to block certain… Read More

Payments to Study Participants: Experts Discuss Potential Framework

RAPS, February 27, 2018
by Michael Mezher, featuring NEJM article produced as part of the Harvard Catalyst Project

Members of the Petrie-Flom Center's collaboration with the Regulatory Foundations, Ethics, and Law Program of Harvard Catalyst | The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science… Read More

Legal Roundtable: Panel addresses governor’s indictment

St. Louis Public Radio, February 26, 2018
by Mary Edwards, featuring Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the discussion: On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, our monthly Legal Roundtable panelists discussed recent issues pertaining to the law, including the indictment of Gov. Eric Greitens,… Read More

The Trump administration just made another big move to reshape the healthcare system

Business Insider, February 20, 2018
by Bob Bryan, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: "Short-term insurance plans will cherry pick healthy people, leaving ACA-compliant plans to cover a sicker pool with higher premiums," Levitt tweeted. "With the expansion in short-term… Read More

Staff Attorney
Criminal Justice Policy Program, Harvard Law School

Deadline: Open until filled

Duties & ResponsibilitiesThe Staff Attorney will work closely with the program’s Executive Director, Policy Director, and faculty. The Staff Attorney’s work will be two-fold. First, the… Read More

Preventing Mitochondrial Disease

Obstetrics & Gynecology, March 2018 - Volume 131 - Issue 3
by Eli Y. Adashi and I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

Abstract: In a possible first, the heritable transmission of a fatal mitochondrial DNA disease (Leigh syndrome) may have been prevented by replacing the mutation-bearing mitochondria of oocytes with donated… Read More

Healthy People Health Policy Fellowship
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Deadline: February 24, 2018

DescriptionA fellowship is available in the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP) within the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health (OASH), Office of the Secretary (OS), at the… Read More

CSPC 2018: Building Bridges Between Science, Policy, and Society
Canadian Science Policy Centre

Deadline: April 23, 2018

OverviewThe Canadian Science Policy Centre announces the call for panel proposals for the 10th Canadian Science Policy Conference (CSPC) to be held in Ottawa, Ontario, on November… Read More

Delinking Reimbursement

Minnesota Law Review, Forthcoming, February 14, 2018
by Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Over the past few years, calls for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to approve pharmaceuticals more speedily have grown louder. At the same time, many have argued that America’s… Read More

Trump fires first salvo on drug prices

The Hill, February 12, 2018
by Peter Sullivan, referencing Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: President Trump is beginning to move on high drug prices, unveiling a series of modest proposals in his budget request released Monday. It’s the first time Trump has issued major… Read More

Trump teams rolls out new drug pricing ideas

Politico, February 12, 2018
by Sarah Karlin-Smith, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: TRUMP TEAM TAKES ANOTHER STAB AT DRUG PRICES: ARE THEY SERIOUS THIS TIME? — Late last week came two new signs the White House may finally be ready to move beyond rhetoric on… Read More

Reforming Biopharmaceutical Pricing at Home and Abroad

Executive Office of the President of the United States, February 2018
by The Council of Economic Advisers, citing work by Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: The affordability of healthcare and biopharmaceutical drugs is a top concern for Americans. It is often asserted that promoting innovation and affordable drugs are conflicting goals.… Read More

Budget, White Paper Provide Insight Into Trump Administration’s Strategy On Drug Pricing

Health Affairs, February 12, 2018
by Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: During his first year in office, President Donald Trump spoke often about the problem of high drug prices but took no action on the subject. President Trump’s new budget proposal and… Read More

Hundreds sign on to letter opposing ‘right to try’ drug bill

The Hill , February 5, 2018
by Rachel Roubein, reporting on Holly Fernandez Lynch (Former Executive Director and Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the Article:  Several hundred "right to try" critics sent a letter to House Energy and Commerce Committee leaders expressing their “strong opposition” to the bill President… Read More

Physicians, ethicists urge Congress not to pass ‘right-to-try’ legislation

Stat, February 1, 2018
by Ike Swetlitz, reporting on Holly Fernandez Lynch (Former Executive Director and Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Dozens of doctors, medical ethicists, and lawyers are warning Congress that legislation to allow Americans with life-threatening conditions access to unapproved, experimental drugs risks… Read More

Analyst in Health Policy
Congressional Research Service (CRS), Domestic Social Policy Division

Deadline: March 02, 2018

SummaryThe Congressional Research Service (CRS), Domestic Social Policy Division is seeking an Analyst in Health Policy to work on issues related to biomedical and health services policy. A general understanding… Read More

The Future of Healthcare Could Be a Privacy Nightmare

Tonic Vice, February 8, 2018
by Susan Rinkunas, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article: If Amazon had that authorization, it would be able to use people’s health information to nudge them toward specific products, says I. Glenn Cohen, a Harvard Law School professor… Read More

Public Health Analyst
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Deadline: February 24, 2018

General DescriptionThe CDC Foundation helps the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) save and improve lives by unleashing the power of collaboration between CDC, philanthropies, corporations,… Read More

White House Calls to Expedite Review of 2nd or 3rd Classes of New Molecular Entities

Regulatory Focus, February 09, 2018
by Zachary Brennan, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: The White House's Council of Economic Advisers on Friday released a report on drug pricing, suggesting changes to the Medicare and Medicaid programs and reforming the US Food and… Read More

Can Healthcare Avoid “Black Box” Artificial Intelligence Tools?

Health IT Analytics, February 2, 2018
by Jennifer Bresnick, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director) and W. Nicholson Price II (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: Artificial intelligence is taking the healthcare industry by storm as researchers share breakthrough after breakthrough and vendors quickly commercialize advanced algorithms offering… Read More

Research and Communications Associate
Petrie-Flom Center, Harvard Law School

Deadline: This position has been filled.

Duties & ResponsibilitiesReporting to the Petrie-Flom Center’s Administrative Director and working closely with the Center’s Executive Director, Faculty Director, and other staff, the Research… Read More

Trump’s abandoned promise to bring down drug prices, explained

Vox, February 2, 2018
by Dylan Scott, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: One year into Donald Trump’s presidency, as he delivered his first State of the Union address, he has more or less abandoned his outspoken pledges to bring down the cost of America’s… Read More

The Regulatory Accountability Act of 2017 — Implications for FDA Regulation and Public Health

NEJM, February 1, 2018
by Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus), Erin C. Fuse Brown, and Aaron S. Kesselheim

From the article: In the past year, federal health policy has been characterized by pervasive uncertainty, but a consistent theme from the Trump administration and some prominent legislators has been opposition… Read More

Privacy experts alarmed as Amazon moves into the health care industry

Washington Post, January 30, 2018
by Abha Bhattarai, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article: Amazon.com on Tuesday announced a joint partnership with Berkshire Hathaway and JP Morgan to create an independent health-care company for their employees, putting an end to months… Read More

You can love the brain and football, too

StarTribune, January 31, 2018
by Francis X. Shen (Senior Fellow)

Check out the new op-ed from Francis X. Shen, Senior Fellow in Law and Neuroscience at the Project on Law and Applied Neuroscience, a collaboration between the Center for Law, Brain… Read More

Physicians, ethicists urge Congress not to pass ‘right to try’ legislation

STAT News, February 1, 2018
by Ike Swetlitz reporting on Holly Fernandez Lynch (Former Executive Director and Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Dozens of doctors, medical ethicists, and lawyers are warning Congress that legislation to allow Americans with life-threatening conditions access to unapproved, experimental drugs risks… Read More

Pharmaceutical Advertising in Medical Journals

CHEST, Volume 153, Issue 1
by Michael S. Sinha, Aaron S. Kesselheim, and Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: Marketing efforts across many industries, including the health-care industry, have shifted toward digital advertising through web-based, social media, and mobile application platforms.… Read More

Trump Pledges To Lower Drug Costs — Can We Do It?

NPR, January 31, 2018
by Anthony Brooks, interviewing Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the podcast: President Trump says in his State of the Union that going after the high cost of prescription drugs is a top priority. Politicians have promised for years to bring them down. We’ll… Read More

Petrie-Flom Center launches Project on Precision Medicine, Artificial Intelligence, and the Law

Harvard Law Today, January 31, 2018
by Q & A with I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

The Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School and the Center for Advanced Studies in Biomedical Innovation Law (CeBIL) at the University of… Read More

PFC Spotlight: Academic Fellow Alumnus Matthew J. B. Lawrence

Petrie-Flom Center , January 31, 2018

Matthew J. B. Lawrence was an Academic Fellow from 2010-2013, during which time his research focused on health care reform and health insurance coverage decision-making. Today, he is Assistant… Read More

The Petrie-Flom Center Launches the Innovative Funding Models in Translational Research Project

The Petrie-Flom Center, January 29, 2018

January 30, 2018 - The Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School is launching the Innovative Funding Models in Translational Research Project to… Read More

Health Economist
Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER)

Deadline: Open until filled.

General Description:The Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER) is an innovative, independent non-profit health care research organization dedicated to improving the application of evidence throughout… Read More

Senior Scientist, Health Technology Assessment
Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER)

Deadline: Open until filled.

The Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER) is an innovative, independent non-profit health care research organization dedicated to improving the application of evidence throughout the health… Read More

Legal Director
Health Law Advocates (HLA)

Deadline: Open until filled.

Health Law Advocates (HLA) is a non-profit, public interest law firm committed to ensuring universal access to quality health care in Massachusetts. HLA is seeking a Legal Director to expand its litigation… Read More

The Federal Right to Try Act of 2017

JAMA Internal Medicine, January 22, 2018
by Alison Bateman-House and Christopher T. Robertson (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: In 2017, President Trump said that “one thing that’s always disturbed”1 him is that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) denies access to experimental drugs… Read More

Research Fellow for Precision Medicine
Petrie-Flom Center, Harvard Law School

Deadline: Position has been filled.

Duties & ResponsibilitiesThis is a newly created full-time term appointment for a post-doctoral employee needed to support the work of the Petrie-Flom Center on a sponsored research project in collaboration… Read More

The Petrie-Flom Center Launches New Project

Petrie-Flom Center, January 23, 2018

The Project on Precision Medicine, Artificial Intelligence, and the Law will seek to better understand the frontiers of big data in health care diagnostics, through interdisciplinary analysis of important… Read More

Cops, Docs, and Code: A Dialogue between Big Data in Health Care and Predictive Policing

UC Davis Law Review, Vol. 51, No. 437, 2017
by I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director) and Harry Graver

Abstract: “Big data” has become the ubiquitous watchword of this decade. Predictive analytics, which is something we want to do with big data -- to use of electronic algorithms to forecast… Read More

It’s time to levy penalties for failing to report clinical trial results

STAT, January 17, 2018
by Holly Fernandez Lynch (Academic Fellow Alumna and former Executive Director)

From the article: I started my first job as an attorney in the fall of 2007, days after President George W. Bush signed the Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act (FDAAA) into law. As part… Read More

Tip of the Iceberg II

11 NYU Journal of Law & Liberty 770, January 12, 2018
by Christopher T. Robertson (Academic Fellow Alumnus) and Victor Laurien

Abstract In recent years, the Food and Drug Administration’s pre-market approval process has come under increasing scrutiny as an infringement on liberty and a regulation of speech. In the first… Read More

A New Approach to Treat Childhood Leukemia: Novartis’ CAR-T Therapy

The Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics, January 10, 2018
by Frazer A. Tessema and Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: On August 30, 2017, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced the approval of tisagenlecleucel (Kymriah; CTL019), Novartis' new treatment for B-cell acute lymphoblastic… Read More

Federal Right-to-Try Legislation — Threatening the FDA’s Public Health Mission

NEJM, January 10, 2018
by Steven Joffe and Holly Fernandez Lynch (Academic Fellow Alumna and former Executive Director)

From the article: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is the gatekeeper of the country’s drugs and medical devices. Originally created to prevent the misleading of patients, it was later tasked… Read More

Divorced couple take their fight over frozen embryos to Colorado Supreme Court

ABC News, January 10, 2018
by Andrew Fies, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the story: What happens when the parents who created frozen embryos go to war with each other over whether to procreate with them or destroy them? That's the battle now being waged before the… Read More

Court to weigh if one parent has the right to use frozen embryos if the other objects

Washington Post, January 9, 2018
by Ariana Eunjung Cha, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article: On Tuesday, the Colorado Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in the Rookses' case. Although several other cases have made their way to states' high courts, legal… Read More

PFC Spotlight: Student Fellow Alumna Emily Largent

Petrie-Flom Center, January 9, 2018

Emily Largent, JD, PhD, RN, was Peter Barton Hutt Student Fellow during the 2014-2015 academic year, while a second-year law student at Harvard Law School. Then-Academic Fellow Matthew Lawrence and… Read More

A Big Pharma-funded charity that helps patients pay for drugs just sued the government

Washington Post, January 8, 2018
by Carolyn Y. Johnson, quoting Christopher T. Robertson (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: These charities help patients out, but they also provide a lucrative philanthropic option for donors. Drug companies get reimbursed by government health programs or private… Read More

Drug Policy: The Year In Review, And The Year Ahead

Health Affairs Blog, January 4, 2018
by Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article:  Last year was an unquestionably busy time for health care news of all kinds. Media and policy coverage rightly focused on the many attempts to repeal the Affordable Care Act, but… Read More

India’s Hospitals Are Filling Up With Desperate Americans

Foreign Policy, January 2, 2018
by Daniel Block, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article:  Medical tourism thus presents both opportunities and risks. At its best, the industry can help India grow its health care system, using the revenues generated from international… Read More

This old drug was free. Now it’s $109,500 a year.

The Washington Post, December 18, 2017
by Carolyn Y. Johnson, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: But the price has been on a roller coaster in recent years — zooming from a list price of $50 for a bottle of 100 pills in the early 2000s up to $13,650 in 2015, then plummeting… Read More

Communications Associate
Association for Community Affiliated Plans (ACAP)

Deadline: Open until filled.

POSITION SUMMARY                             The Association… Read More

Speed, Safety, and Industry Funding — From PDUFA I to PDUFA VI

The New England Journal of Medicine, December 7, 2017
by Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus), Jerry Avorn, and Aaron S. Kesselheim

From the paper: In August, President Donald Trump signed into law the sixth version of key legislation for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), known as the Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA VI).… Read More

The FDA’s Expedited Programs and Clinical Development Times for Novel Therapeutics, 2012-2016

JAMA, Issue 318, no. 21
by Thomas J. Hwang, Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus), Aaron S. Kesselheim

From the paper: The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has 4 expedited programs to speed the development and review of drugs treating serious diseases: (1) priority review leads to FDA review in 6 months… Read More

Will inter partes review speed US generic drug entry?

Nature Biotechnology, Issue 35
by Jonathan J Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus), Reed F Beall & Aaron S Kesselheim

From the paper: Patents are ubiquitous in the pharmaceutical industry and are used by brand-name drug manufacturers to prevent low-cost generic competition and maintain high drug prices. Patents are granted… Read More

Explaining the Absence of Surgical Procedure Regulation

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy, Vol 27, Issue 189
by Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the paper: Each year in the United States, surgeons perform approximately 64 million surgical procedures, ranging from tooth extraction to open heart surgery.2 Yet, notwithstanding the frequency of… Read More

Trump’s zeal for deregulation could gum up the FDA, experts say

STAT, December 20, 2017
by Meghana Keshavan, quoting Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: President Trump quite literally cut a stretch of red tape last week to emphasize his slash-and-burn stance on government deregulation. But what would sweeping regulatory change… Read More

Fellowship in Bioethics
Harvard Medical School Center for Bioethics

Deadline: March 19, 2018

General Description:The Harvard Medical School Fellowship in Bioethics is a one-year, part-time program committed to developing leaders with an expertise in bioethics. The core of the fellowship is a weekly… Read More

Full Professor for Quantitative Methods in Public Health and Health Services Research
UMIT - University for Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology in Tirol, Austria

Deadline: January 31, 2018

General Description:UMIT - University for Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology is an accredited private university owned by the Federal State of Tyrol and the University of Innsbruck with… Read More

Call for PhD Applications
Collaborative Research Programme in Biomedical Innovation Law (CeBIL), University of Copenhagen

Deadline: Open until filled.

About the programmeSupported by a research grant of DKK 35 million from the Novo Nordisk Foundation, the  Collaborative Research Programme in Biomedical Innovation Law (CeBIL) will address and… Read More

Encouraging New Uses for Old Drugs

JAMA, December 4, 2017
by Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna), Paul B. Ginsburg, and Dana P. Goldman

From the paper: US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of a new drug typically coincides with a period of patent protection, during which the manufacturer will often apply for additional indications… Read More

Sanofi scandal in the Philippines could spread dangerous mistrust of vaccines

STAT, December 11, 2017
by Ed Silverman, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article: Unfortunately, there are indications that the company, which could use a blockbuster product, should have taken its corporate foot off the gas pedal.  And to restore confidence in… Read More

Regulating Black-Box Medicine

Michigan Law Review, Vol. 116, Issue 3
by W. Nicholson Price II (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the paper: Data drive modern medicine. And our tools to analyze those data are growing ever more powerful. As health data are collected in greater and greater amounts, sophisticated algorithms based… Read More

2018-2019 Postdoctoral Research Fellowship
Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM), University of Michigan-Ann Arbor

Deadline: January 12, 2018

The Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM), a multidisciplinary research unit sponsored by the University of Michigan Medical School Dean's Office, the Office of Clinical Affairs,… Read More

2018 Health Law & Policy Summer Internship
Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation of Harvard Law School (CHLPI)

Deadline: January 27, 2018

GENERAL DESCRIPTION:The Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation of Harvard Law School (CHLPI) advocates for legal, regulatory, and policy reforms to improve the health of underserved populations,… Read More

2017’s Word Of The Year In Health Law And Bioethics: Uncertainty

Health Affairs, December 8, 2017
by Carmel Shachar (Executive Director) and I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

Note: This post is the first in a series of Health Affairs posts from the Sixth Annual Health Law Year in P/Review event, held at Harvard Law School on Tuesday, December 12, 2017. … Read More

Manager, Health Policy
Chan Zuckerberg Initiative

Deadline: Open until filled.

The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative is dedicated to advancing human potential and promoting equal opportunity through technology, grantmaking, impact investing, policy, and advocacy work. We look for bold ideas… Read More

The Health 202

The Washington Post, November 30, 2017
by Paige Winfield Cunninghamm, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: If the opioid epidemic was simply a problem of supply – people being able to access drugs too easily – than a targeted new effort in Appalachia announced… Read More

Research Fellow
Center for Public Health Law, Temple University

Deadline: Open until filled (rolling admissions)

The Center for Public Health Law Research (CPHLR) supports the widespread adoption of scientific tools and methods for mapping and evaluating the impact of law on health. The Center works by developing… Read More

NOW AVAILABLE! Big Data, Health Law, and Bioethics

Cambridge University Press, Forthcoming, March 2018
by Edited by I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director), Holly Fernandez Lynch (former Executive Director), Urs Gasser, and Effy Vayena

This edited volume stems from the Petrie-Flom Center’s 2016 annual conference, which brought together leading experts to identify the various ways in which law and ethics intersect with… Read More

Germ-Line Gene Editing and Congressional Reaction in Context

Journal of Law and Health, Vol. 30 (2017), Issue 1
by Russell A. Spivak, I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director), and Eli Y. Adashi

Abstract: On December 18, 2015, President Obama signed into law a policy rider forestalling the therapeutic modification of the human germ line. The rider, motivated by the science’s potential unethical… Read More