2018-2019 Petrie-Flom Center Student Fellowship
Harvard Law School

Deadline: Advanced Submission Deadline for HLS Students: May 18, 2018

The Center and Student FellowshipThe Petrie-Flom Center Student Fellowship Program is designed to mentor students seeking to become thought leaders in health law policy and bioethics. The fellowship supports… Read More

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS! 2018-2019 Petrie-Flom Center Student Fellowship

Petrie-Flom Center, Harvard Law School, Advanced Submission Deadline for HLS Students: May 18, 2018

What do a MacArthur Genius award winner, several health law professors at top schools, executive directors of leading health law centers, an associate chief counsel of the FDA, and partners and… Read More

2017-2018 Petrie-Flom Center Student Fellowship
Harvard Law School

Deadline: August 11, 2017

The deadline for applications for the 2017-2018 fellowship is now closed.  The Center and Student Fellowship.The Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics is an interdisciplinary… Read More

Uninsured Rate Remains Basically Flat Despite Republicans’ Attempts To Chip Away At Health Law

Kaiser Health News, May 22, 2018

KHN Morning Briefing: Summaries of health policy coverage from major news organizations The numbers from the government survey suggest a surprising resilience of the health law and its expansion of… Read More

Call for Proposals
Policies for Action: Policy and Law Research to Build a Culture of Health

Deadline: June 07, 2018 3:00 PM

General DescriptionApproximately $2.0 million will be awarded through P4A's 2018 CFP, which includes approximately $1,550,000 total for the general CFP, and $450,000 set aside for pre-emption-focused… Read More

Center for Public Health Law Research Fellow
Center for Public Health Law Research, Temple University

Deadline: Open until filled.

General DescriptionThe Center for Public Health Law Research (CPHLR) supports the widespread adoption of scientific tools and methods for mapping and evaluating the impact of law on health. The Center… Read More

HHS Secretary Clarifies Trump Administration’s Plan To Reduce Prescription Drug Prices

NPR, May 17, 2018
by Alison Kodjak

[...] KELLY: First start just by reminding us what this proposal is. The president came out and made an announcement about drug prices last Friday in the Rose Garden. What exactly did he say? KODJAK:… Read More

F.D.A. Names and Shames Drug Makers to Encourage Generic Competition

New York Times, May 17, 2018
by Sheila Kaplan

Pharmaceutical companies that spend billions of dollars to develop new drugs do not want competitors to profit from inexpensive generic copies of blockbuster medicines. To avoid rivals, they fight for… Read More

Judge Overturns Assisted Suicide Law In California

NPR, May 16, 2018
by Scott Neuman

A California law permitting physicians to prescribe life-ending drugs to terminally ill patients has been overturned by a judge who says it was passed unconstitutionally. Judge Daniel Ottolia of the Riverside… Read More

Do NFL Safety Concerns Mean Regulators Should Get in the Game?

Bloomberg Environment, April 26, 2018
by Fatima Hussein, featuring report by the Law and Ethics Initiative of the Football Players Health Study at Harvard University

From the article: Concussions involving NFL players have been an increasing worry. Now a debate has resurfaced about whether federal safety regulators should be able to fine teams found guilty of inflicting… Read More

The Ethics of Medicaid’s Work Requirements and Other Personal Responsibility Policies

JAMA, May 7, 2018
by Harald Schmidt and Allison K. Hoffman (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the paper:  Breaking controversial new ground, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) recently invited states to consider establishing work requirements as a condition of receiving… Read More

Grants

Berkeley Technology Law Journal, May 10, 2018
by W. Nicholson Price II (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the paper: Innovation is a primary source of economic growth, and is accordingly the target of substantial academic and government attention. Grants are a key tool in the government’s arsenal… Read More

Drug made famous by Shkreli’s 5,000% price hike is still $750 a pill

Ars Technica, May 4, 2018
by Beth Mole, quoting W. Nicholson Price II (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: Disgraced ex-pharmaceutical executive and hedge fund manager Martin Shkreli is now behind bars, facing a seven-year prison sentence for securities fraud. Yet the drug-price hike… Read More

For Shame: ‘Pharma Bro’ Shkreli Is In Prison, But Daraprim’s Price Is Still High

Washington Post, May 4, 2018
by Shefali Luthra, quoting W. Nicholson Price II (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: The continued high price of the drug is a cautionary tale to those who hope that public shaming of a few “bad actors” can curb escalating drug prices, because the problem… Read More

Work Requirements Give Republicans Cover to Expand Medicaid

U.S. News, April 23, 2018
by Gabrielle Levy, quoting Allison K. Hoffman (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: While the Medicaid law sets certain mandatory minimums of eligibility and coverage, the waiver program allows states wide latitude to run their programs as they see fit. For state Republican… Read More

4 Takeaways From Trump’s Plan To Rescind CHIP Funding

Kaiser Health News, May 8, 2018
by Phil Galewitz

President Donald Trump wants to employ a rarely used budget maneuver called “rescission” to eliminate $15 billion in federal spending, including $7 billion from the popular Children’s… Read More

Planned Parenthood sues Trump administration over federal funding

The Washington Times, May 2, 2018
by Alex Swoyer, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article: Three Planned Parenthood affiliates sued Wednesday to demand taxpayer money keep flowing to the country’s largest abortion network, saying a new Trump administration policy… Read More

De Blasio Moves to Bring Safe Injection Sites to New York City

New York Times, May 3, 2018
by William Neuman

Mayor Bill de Blasio is championing a plan that would make New York City a pioneer in creating supervised injection sites for illegal drug users, part of a novel but contentious strategy to combat the… Read More

‘Who the hell is this person?’ Trump’s Mar-a-Lago pal stymies VA project

Politico, April 30, 2018
by Arthur Allen

A West Palm Beach doctor’s ties to Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago social circle have enabled him to hold up the biggest health information technology project in history — the transformation… Read More

How A Drug Company Under Pressure For High Prices Ratchets Up Political Activity

Kaiser Health News, April 30, 2018
by Jay Hancock and Elizabeth Lucas

Business looked challenging for Novo Nordisk at the end of 2016. As pressure mounted over the pharma giant’s soaring insulin prices, investors drove its stock down by a third on fears that policymakers… Read More

Addressing Financial Barriers to Enrollment in Clinical Trials

JAMA Oncology, April 19, 2018
by Emily A. Largent and Holly Fernandez Lynch (Former Executive Director)

From the article: Shortfalls in clinical trial recruitment and retention constitute a major obstacle to scientific advancement. One means of increasing patient participation rates is to reduce associated… Read More

Ronny Jackson Withdraws As VA Nominee

NPR, April 26, 2018
by Jessica Taylor and Brian Naylor

Rear Adm. Ronny Jackson, President Trump's embattled nominee to lead the Department of Veterans Affairs, has withdrawn from consideration for the post amid allegations he had fostered a hostile work… Read More

Administration’s Teen Pregnancy Prevention Funding Rules Favor Abstinence-Focused Programs

Kaiser Health News, April 24, 2018

KHN Morning Briefing: Summaries of health policy coverage from major news organizations The new rules for the funding do not exclude programs that provide information about contraception and protected… Read More

F.D.A. Cracks Down on Sales of E-Cigarettes to Minors

New York Times, April 24, 2018
by Kate Zernike and Sheila Kaplan

The Food and Drug Administration announced on Tuesday that it was cracking down on the sales of e-cigarettes to minors, especially the popular vaping Juul brand, and said it had issued warning… Read More

Redesigning Maternal Care: OB-GYNs Are Urged to See New Mothers Sooner and More Often

ProPublica, April 23, 2018
by Nina Martin

Doctors would see new mothers sooner and more frequently, and insurers would cover the increased visits, under sweeping new recommendations from the organization that sets standards of care for obstetrician-gynecologists… Read More

The FDA Breakthrough-Drug Designation — Four Years of Experience

The New England Journal of Medicine, April 12, 2018
by Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus), Jerry Avorn, and Aaron S. Kesselheim,

This article is behind a paywall. Harvard affiliates can access the full text via Hollis +. From the article: In 2012, Congress created the “breakthrough therapy” designation to expedite Food… Read More

As Opioid Prescriptions Fall, Prescriptions for Drugs to Treat Addiction Rise

New York Times, April 19, 2018
by Abby Goodnough

WASHINGTON — The number of new monthly prescriptions for medications that treat opioid addiction nearly doubled over the past two years, according to new data, while prescriptions for opioid… Read More

THE PRICE OF VACCINES MUST BE DISCLOSED, ORDERS A COURT

La Presse, April 19, 2018
by Marie-Claude Malboeuf, Suit brought by Jean-Christophe Belisle Pipon (Visiting Researcher)

From the article: Pharmaceutical companies doing business with the government will no longer be able to hide how much money they are getting to provide vaccines. This is what the Commission for Access… Read More

Move over right-to-try: FDA looks at improving clinical trial enrollment

Politico, April 16, 2018
by Sarah Karlin-Smith, quoting Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: The FDA’s bar for “breakthrough” designation may be too low, Harvard Medical School policy researchers argue in the New England Journal of Medicine. The designation… Read More

Federal Appeals Court Puts Chill On Maryland Law To Fight Drug Price-Gouging

Kaiser Health News, April 17, 2018
by Shefali Luthra

States continue to battle budget-busting prices of prescription drugs. But a federal court decision could limit the weapons available to them — underscoring the challenge states face as they, in… Read More

New Article Examines the Possibility of Applying Workplace Safety Rules to the NFL

Part of the Law and Ethics Initiative of the Football Players Health Study at Harvard University, April 17, 2018
by Article authored by Adam M. Finkel, Chris Deubert, Orly Lobel, I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director), and Holly Fernandez Lynch (Former Executive Director

Could occupational health and safety laws be applied to better protect NFL players? A new analysis, published on April 17 in the Arizona Law Review, explores this very possibility. The article, written… Read More

Is the ‘Breakthrough Therapy’ Process Putting Dangerous Drugs on Store Shelves?

Healthline, April 17, 2018
by Shawn Radcliffe, quoting Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: A CNN report last week detailed the deaths of more than 700 patients prescribed an antipsychotic therapy drug for Parkinson’s disease. The Food and Drug Administration… Read More

Is FDA breakthrough therapy really valuable?

Genet, April 13, 2018
by Liu Xuan Tong, quoting Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: In the recent New England Journal of Medicine, articles published by Harvard University's Jonathan Darrow, Jerry Avorn, and Aaron Kesselheim point out many of the issues arising from… Read More

FDA Launches Criminal Investigation Into Unauthorized Herpes Vaccine Research

Kaiser Health News, April 12, 2018
by Marisa Taylor

The Food and Drug Administration has launched a criminal investigation into research by a Southern Illinois University professor who injected people with his unauthorized herpes vaccine, Kaiser Health… Read More

When ‘Breakthrough’ Drugs Aren’t Actually Breakthroughs: FDA’s Approval Pathway Can Be Misleading

Kaiser Health News, April 12, 2018
by KHN Morning Briefing, quoting Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: In a review of three years of drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration under a “breakthrough therapy” pathway, researchers argue that some of the compounds are not… Read More

Does the FDA’s ‘breakthrough’ drug program need to be reformed? Harvard skeptics say yes

Endpoint News, April 12, 2018
by John Carroll, quoting Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: Of all the expedited review programs that the FDA has set up, none are as popular as the “breakthrough” therapy designation. And a group of high-profile skeptics says that… Read More

Senior Fellow, Solomon Center for Health Law and Policy
Yale Law School

Deadline: April 15, 2018

General Description: Solomon Center for Health Law and Policy at Yale Law School is seeking to hire a recent J.D. to serve as a Senior Fellow for the center beginning in the summer… Read More

Why Scott Gottlieb is the one Trump official everybody seems to like

Vox, April 11, 2018
by Julia Belluz, German Lopez, and Dylan Scott , quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: When Scott Gottlieb was appointed commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration last May, some were concerned he’d be a shill for the pharmaceutical industry.… Read More

FDA-designated ‘breakthrough’ therapies may not actually be scientific breakthroughs

Stat, April 11, 2018
by Ike Swetlitz, quoting Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: WASHINGTON — In a review of three years of drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration under a “breakthrough therapy” pathway, researchers argue that some of… Read More

US FDA’s Breakthrough Program Needs Higher Standard For Comparators, NEJM Says

Pink Sheet, April 11, 2018
by Michael Cipriano, quoting Jonathan Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

This article is behind a paywall. Readers will have to pay for full access to the article.  Executive Summary Harvard Medical School researchers call for inclusion of off-label drugs, accelerated… Read More

Utah’s quixotic Medicaid expansion plan, explained

Vox, April 2, 2018
by Dylan Scott, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Utah wants to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. Kind of. The state legislature has passed and Gov. Gary Herbert has signed a bill that would partially expand… Read More

Healthcare Accreditation Driving Patient Excellence in Europe

by Medical Tourism Magazine, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article: In the business of medical travel, quality drives the market and the quality of healthcare a hospital or healthcare organization provides is often validated by its accreditation status.… Read More

Administration Relaxes Essential Benefits Regulations, Creates New Mandate Exemptions

Kaiser Health News, April 10, 2018

KHN Morning Briefing: Summaries of health policy coverage from major news organizations Overall, the Trump administration's rules addressing the standards for insurers planning to participate… Read More

On Scarcity and the Value of Clinical Trials

The American Journal of Bioethics, 2018, Issue 4, Volume 18
by Luke Gelinas (Senior Researcher), Holly Fernandez Lynch (Former Executive Director), Barbara E. Bierer, & I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the artice: Allocation of scarce goods and resources is a common concern in the health care context, from intensive care unit (ICU) beds, to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) machines, to… Read More

Mutual Obligations in Research and Withholding Payment From Deceptive Participants

The American Journal of Bioethics, 2018, Issue 4, Volume 18
by Holly Fernandez Lynch (Former Executive Director), Luke Gelinas (Senior Researcher), & Emily A. Largent

From the article: Paying research participants can be ethically charged, both when payment is offered and—as demonstrated in this case—when it is withheld. When individuals undergoing screening… Read More

Assisted Reproduction in Israel: Law, Religion, and Culture

Brill Research Perspectives, March 20, 2018
by Avishalom Westreich

From the article: The theme of this composition is the right to procreate in the Israeli context. Our discussion of this right includes the implementation of the right to procreate, restrictions on the… Read More

Medical Marijuana’s ‘Catch-22’

NPR, April 7, 2018
by Marisa Taylor and Melissa Bailey

[...] Although 29 states have legalized marijuana to treat pain and other ailments, the growing number of Americans like Owen who use marijuana and the doctors who treat them are caught in the middle of… Read More

Patient Advocacy Groups Take In Millions From Drugmakers. Is There A Payback?

Kaiser Health News, April 6, 2018
by Emily Kopp, Sydney Lupkin, and Elizabeth Lucas

​Pharmaceutical companies gave at least $116 million to patient advocacy groups in a single year, reveals a new database logging 12,000 donations from large publicly traded drugmakers to… Read More

The Work of the Supreme Court

Hosted by the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School, April 11, 2018

PLEASE NOTE: A Harvard ID is required in order to attend this event.  Harvard affiliates: RSVP now! Read More

Trump’s Physician Tapped To Lead VA After President Dismisses Shulkin Following Weeks Of Controversy

Kaiser Health News, March 29, 2018

KHN Morning Briefing: Summaries of health policy coverage from major news organizations While Dr. Ronny Jackson has been praised for his work as a physician, critics call into question his lack of… Read More

Prevalence of Publicly Available Expanded Access Policies

Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics, March 23, 2018
by Emily Jung (Petrie-Flom Student Intern), Patricia J. Zettler, Aaron S. Kesselheim

From the Article: The Food and Drug Administration's expanded access program allows patients with serious or immediately life‐threatening conditions to seek access to experimental drugs and treatments… Read More

Between the lines on insurers and drug rebates

Axios Vitals, March 28, 2018
by Sam Baker, citing Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: UnitedHealthcare and Aetna have committed to lowering some consumers' out-of-pocket drug costs by sharing the rebates that pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs) negotiate with… Read More

Price Insensitivity. Guest, Rachel Sachs

The Week in Health Law, Episode 132, March 22, 2018
by Nicolas Terry and Frank Pasquale, interviewing Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the podcast: This week’s episode features a welcome return from Rachel Sachs, Associate Professor of Law at the Washington University in St. Louis School of Law. Rachel’s primary… Read More

Medicare Is Cracking Down on Opioids. Doctors Fear Pain Patients Will Suffer.

New York Times, March 27, 2018
by Jan Hoffman

Medicare officials thought they had finally figured out how to do their part to fix the troubling problem of opioids being overprescribed to the old and disabled: In 2016, a staggering one in three… Read More

A Hitler-Era Abortion Law Haunts Merkel, and Germany

New York Times, March 27, 2018
by Melissa Eddy

[...] The law, paragraph 219a of the German criminal code, makes it a crime for doctors to publicly advertise in any way that they perform abortions, even though they are permitted in the first 12… Read More

It’s hard to be economically rational when you’re sick

The Hill, March 21, 2018
by Christopher T. Robertson (Academic Fellow alumnus) and Victor Laurion

From the article: We may be in the early days of a changing political ideology. For decades, politicians on both sides have espoused the belief that copayments and other out-of-pocket charges are necessary… Read More

House passes right-to-try on second try

Politico, March 21, 2018
by Sarah Karlin-Smith, quoting Christopher T. Robertson (Academic Fellow alumnus)

From the Article: The House of Representatives passed on party lines Wednesday evening a bill designed to let very sick patients request access to experimental medicines without government oversight. The… Read More

Call for Papers: Wiet Life Sciences Scholars Conference
Loyola University, Beazley Institute for Health Law and Policy

Deadline: May 15, 2018

General Description: Loyola University Chicago’s nationally acclaimed Beazley Institute for Health Law and Policy is pleased to invite original research submissions for the annual Wiet Life… Read More

Fulbright Visiting Research Chair in Health Law, Policy and Ethics
University of Ottawa Center for Health Law, Policy and Ethics

Deadline: August 01, 2018

General Description: Breakthroughs in health sciences offer tremendous hope to patients and the public, but with progress emerge new legal and ethical challenges. This position allows a scholar to… Read More

With Premiums Likely To Spike Just Before Midterms, Lawmakers Are Bracing For Blame Game Battle

Kaiser Health News, March 26, 2018

KHN Morning Briefing: Summaries of health policy coverage from major news organizations Language on abortion threw a wrench in both sides' plans to add money to stabilize the marketplace into… Read More

National Institutes of Health IRB Internship Program Fall 2018
University of Bergen

Deadline: April 22, 2018

General Description:Members of Institutional Review Boards (IRBs), IRB administrators, research ethics committees, tribal governance bodies, and others who are currently employed in positions related to… Read More

Spending Bill Lets CDC Study Gun Violence; But Researchers Are Skeptical It Will Help

NPR, March 23, 2018
by Nell Greenfieldboyce

Government health agencies have spent more than two decades shying away from gun violence research, but some say the new spending bill, signed by President Trump on Friday, will change that. That is because,… Read More

Prominent AIDS Researcher Named As CDC Chief Despite Concerns Over Misconduct Investigation

Kaiser Health News, March 22, 2018

KHN Morning Briefing: Summaries of health policy coverage from major news organizations Dr. Robert Redfield "has dedicated his entire life to promoting public health and providing compassionate care… Read More

Medical Research, Drug Treatment And Mental Health Are Winners In New Budget Bill

NPR, March 22, 2018
by Alison Kodjak

The big budget deal reached this week in the House doesn't include a long-sought-after provision to stabilize the Affordable Care Act marketplaces. But the $1.3 billion plan, set to fund the government… Read More

General Attorney, Executive Office of the President
Office of Management and Budget, Washington DC

Deadline: March 23, 2018

General Description The general counsel's office is small, consisting of approximately 15 attorneys, who regularly meet with and advise policy officials in the White House, OMB itself, and other… Read More

Brain Scans in the Courts: Prosecutor’s Dream or Civil Rights Nightmare?

Inside Science, March 14, 2018
by James Gaines, quoting Francis Shen (Senior Fellow in Law and Applied Neuroscience)

From the article:  One of the foundations of the U.S. legal system is the Bill of Rights, which enshrines the idea that there are certain individual liberties and inalienable freedoms that governments… Read More

FDA Takes ‘Historic First Step’ Toward Cutting Nicotine In Cigarettes To Non-Addictive Levels

Kaiser Health News, March 16, 2018

KHN Morning Briefing: Summaries of health policy coverage from major news organizations The move garnered praise from anti-smoking advocates. “There is no other single action our country can… Read More

Trump’s Plan To Combat Opioid Crisis Includes Death Penalty For Drug Dealers

Kaiser Health News, March 16, 2018

KHN Morning Briefing: Summaries of health policy coverage from major news organizations The White House's most concrete proposal yet to address the national drug epidemic comes after complaints… Read More

Abortion, free speech collide in Supreme Court dispute

ABC News, March 16, 2018
by Mark Sherman, Associated Press

Even as it advertises "free pregnancy services" and promises in signs on its door and inside to discuss all options with pregnant women, Informed Choices exists to steer women away from abortion. The state… Read More

Nicotine and Ethics: 2018 Brocher Summer Academy in Population-level Bioethics
Brocher Foundation, Hermance, Switzerland

Deadline: March 31, 2018

General Description:The Brocher Foundation invites junior faculty, post-docs, advanced graduate students, clinicians and other practitioners to apply for inclusion in the 2018 Brocher Summer Academy in… Read More

Billions of Dollars on the Line as Insurers Await Obamacare Ruling

Wall Street Journal, March 15, 2018
by Stephanie Armour

This article is behind a paywall. Harvard affiliates can access the full text via Hollis +. Health insurers and the Trump administration face a court decision shortly that will determine whether the government… Read More

Risk and Resilience in Health Data Infrastructure

Colorado Technology Law Journal, Volume 16, Issue 1 (2017)
by W. Nicholson Price II (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the journal article: Today’s health system runs on data. However, for a system that generates and requires so much data, the health care system is surprisingly bad at maintaining, connecting,… Read More

Lawmakers file a bill to block maneuvers like Allergan’s patent deal with Mohawks

STAT, March 7, 2018
by Ed Silverman quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Angered by a controversial Allergan (AGN1 ) patent maneuver, a handful of lawmakers introduced a bill that would prohibit tribal sovereign immunity from being used to block certain… Read More

Congress Races The Clock In Quest To Bring Stability To Individual Insurance Market

Kaiser Health News, March 2, 2018
by Julie Rovner

[...] The lawmakers are up against not just the legislative clock, but also the insurance companies’ timeline. Insurers have until summer to decide if they want to continue to sell policies… Read More

U.S. Seeks Time to Consider Joining Opioid Litigation

New York Times, March 2, 2018
by Reuters

(Reuters) - The U.S. Justice Department has asked a federal judge overseeing hundreds of lawsuits against opioid manufacturers and distributors to give it 30 days to decide whether to participate in the… Read More

Senators Push For Leadership At Indian Health Service

NPR, March 1, 2018
by Eric Whitney

[...] The Trump administration hasn't named a new nominee to lead IHS, which has been without a permanent leader since 2015. Democrats and Republicans on the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs… Read More

States Seek More Federal Funding For Opioid Treatment, Not More Promises

NPR, March 1, 2018
by John Daley, CPR News and Jackie Fortier, StateImpact Oklahoma

[...] "Very thinly financed, small rural providers are probably at risk of going out of business entirely — up to and including rural hospitals," he says. Getting treatment providers to open… Read More

Payments to Study Participants: Experts Discuss Potential Framework

RAPS, February 27, 2018
by Michael Mezher, featuring NEJM article produced as part of the Harvard Catalyst Project

Members of the Petrie-Flom Center's collaboration with the Regulatory Foundations, Ethics, and Law Program of Harvard Catalyst | The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science… Read More

Legal Roundtable: Panel addresses governor’s indictment

St. Louis Public Radio, February 26, 2018
by Mary Edwards, featuring Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the discussion: On Monday’s St. Louis on the Air, our monthly Legal Roundtable panelists discussed recent issues pertaining to the law, including the indictment of Gov. Eric Greitens,… Read More

The Trump administration just made another big move to reshape the healthcare system

Business Insider, February 20, 2018
by Bob Bryan, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: "Short-term insurance plans will cherry pick healthy people, leaving ACA-compliant plans to cover a sicker pool with higher premiums," Levitt tweeted. "With the expansion in short-term… Read More

Staff Attorney
Criminal Justice Policy Program, Harvard Law School

Deadline: Open until filled

Duties & ResponsibilitiesThe Staff Attorney will work closely with the program’s Executive Director, Policy Director, and faculty. The Staff Attorney’s work will be two-fold. First, the… Read More

In Wake Of Florida Mass Shooting, States Stepping Up To Take Gun Control Into Their Own Hands

Kaiser Health News, February 23, 2018

KHN Morning Briefing: Summaries of health policy coverage from major news organizations Four East Coast states are forming a coalition to better promote and foster gun safety, while other states mull… Read More

Evaluations Of Medicaid Experiments By States, CMS Are Weak, GAO Says

Kaiser Health News, February 23, 2018
by Phil Galewitz

With federal spending on Medicaid experiments soaring in recent years, a congressional watchdog said state and federal governments fail to adequately evaluate if the efforts improve care and save money.… Read More

U.K. Moves Toward Making Adults Presumed Organ Donors

New York Times, February 23, 2018
by Richard Perez-Pena

LONDON — Britain took a crucial step on Friday toward making all adults presumed organ donors unless they say otherwise, which would add the country to a growing list of those that have adopted the… Read More

Preventing Mitochondrial Disease

Obstetrics & Gynecology, March 2018 - Volume 131 - Issue 3
by Eli Y. Adashi and I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

Abstract: In a possible first, the heritable transmission of a fatal mitochondrial DNA disease (Leigh syndrome) may have been prevented by replacing the mutation-bearing mitochondria of oocytes with donated… Read More

Healthy People Health Policy Fellowship
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Deadline: February 24, 2018

DescriptionA fellowship is available in the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP) within the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health (OASH), Office of the Secretary (OS), at the… Read More

A Larger Role for Midwives Could Improve Deficient U.S. Care for Mothers and Babies

ProPublica, February 22, 2018
by Nina Martin

In Great Britain, midwives deliver half of all babies, including Kate Middleton’s first two children, Prince George and Princess Charlotte. In Sweden, Norway and France, midwives oversee… Read More

Trump Administration Wants To Let Insurers Offer Plans With Fewer Benefits

NPR, February 20, 2018
by Alison Kodjak

The Trump administration wants to allow insurance companies to offer more policies that have limited health benefits and that can reject customers if they have pre-existing medical conditions. Health and… Read More

HHS Chief Wants CDC To Conduct Gun Research, Waving Off Congressional Restrictions

Kaiser Health News, February 16, 2018

KHN Morning Briefing: Summaries of health policy coverage from major news organizations "We believe we've got a very important mission with our work with serious mental illness as well as our… Read More

Trump Promises To Tackle ‘Difficult Issue Of Mental Health’ Following Shooting

Kaiser Health News, February 16, 2018

KHN Morning Briefing: Summaries of health policy coverage from major news organizations As national focus turns to mental health after the mass shooting in Florida, advocates warn against making assumptions… Read More

U.K. Supermarkets To Ban Energy Drinks For Shoppers Under 16

NPR, February 16, 2018
by Menaka Wilhelm

Next month, several chain supermarkets in the U.K. will stop selling energy drinks to customers under 16. Anyone looking to buy a soft drink with more than 150 mg of caffeine per liter — a limit… Read More

Delinking Reimbursement

Minnesota Law Review, Forthcoming, February 14, 2018
by Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Over the past few years, calls for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to approve pharmaceuticals more speedily have grown louder. At the same time, many have argued that America’s… Read More

Trump fires first salvo on drug prices

The Hill, February 12, 2018
by Peter Sullivan, referencing Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: President Trump is beginning to move on high drug prices, unveiling a series of modest proposals in his budget request released Monday. It’s the first time Trump has issued major… Read More

Trump teams rolls out new drug pricing ideas

Politico, February 12, 2018
by Sarah Karlin-Smith, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: TRUMP TEAM TAKES ANOTHER STAB AT DRUG PRICES: ARE THEY SERIOUS THIS TIME? — Late last week came two new signs the White House may finally be ready to move beyond rhetoric on… Read More

Reforming Biopharmaceutical Pricing at Home and Abroad

Executive Office of the President of the United States, February 2018
by The Council of Economic Advisers, citing work by Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: The affordability of healthcare and biopharmaceutical drugs is a top concern for Americans. It is often asserted that promoting innovation and affordable drugs are conflicting goals.… Read More

Budget, White Paper Provide Insight Into Trump Administration’s Strategy On Drug Pricing

Health Affairs, February 12, 2018
by Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: During his first year in office, President Donald Trump spoke often about the problem of high drug prices but took no action on the subject. President Trump’s new budget proposal and… Read More

Hundreds sign on to letter opposing ‘right to try’ drug bill

The Hill , February 5, 2018
by Rachel Roubein, reporting on Holly Fernandez Lynch (Former Executive Director and Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the Article:  Several hundred "right to try" critics sent a letter to House Energy and Commerce Committee leaders expressing their “strong opposition” to the bill President… Read More

Idaho Blue Cross Jumps Into Controversial Market For Plans That Bypass ACA Rules

Kaiser Health News, February 14, 2018
by Julie Appleby

That didn’t take long. It’s barely been two weeks since Idaho regulators said they would allow the sale of health insurance that does not meet all of the Affordable Care Act’s requirements… Read More

Physicians, ethicists urge Congress not to pass ‘right-to-try’ legislation

Stat, February 1, 2018
by Ike Swetlitz, reporting on Holly Fernandez Lynch (Former Executive Director and Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Dozens of doctors, medical ethicists, and lawyers are warning Congress that legislation to allow Americans with life-threatening conditions access to unapproved, experimental drugs risks… Read More

Analyst in Health Policy
Congressional Research Service (CRS), Domestic Social Policy Division

Deadline: March 02, 2018

SummaryThe Congressional Research Service (CRS), Domestic Social Policy Division is seeking an Analyst in Health Policy to work on issues related to biomedical and health services policy. A general understanding… Read More

The Future of Healthcare Could Be a Privacy Nightmare

Tonic Vice, February 8, 2018
by Susan Rinkunas, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article: If Amazon had that authorization, it would be able to use people’s health information to nudge them toward specific products, says I. Glenn Cohen, a Harvard Law School professor… Read More

Public Health Analyst
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Deadline: February 24, 2018

General DescriptionThe CDC Foundation helps the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) save and improve lives by unleashing the power of collaboration between CDC, philanthropies, corporations,… Read More

Budget Deal Stuffed Full Of Health Provisions

Kaiser Health News, February 9, 2018

KHN Morning Briefing: Summaries of health policy coverage from major news organizations In the early hours of Friday morning the House passed a spending deal to very quickly reverse a government shutdown… Read More

White House Calls to Expedite Review of 2nd or 3rd Classes of New Molecular Entities

Regulatory Focus, February 09, 2018
by Zachary Brennan, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: The White House's Council of Economic Advisers on Friday released a report on drug pricing, suggesting changes to the Medicare and Medicaid programs and reforming the US Food and… Read More

Trump Says He Will Focus On Opioid Law Enforcement, Not Treatment

NPR, February 7, 2018
by Greg Allen

More than three months after President Trump declared the nation's opioid crisis a public health emergency, activists and health care providers say they're still waiting for some other action.… Read More

Alabama Targets OxyContin Maker Purdue Pharma In Opioid Suit Facebook Twitter Flipboard Email

NPR, February 7, 2018
by Samantha Raphaelson

Alabama filed a lawsuit in federal court on Tuesday against OxyContin producer Purdue Pharma LP claiming the drug company is fueling the opioid epidemic by deceptively marketing prescription painkillers.… Read More

In Sweeping War on Obesity, Chile Slays Tony the Tiger

New York Times, February 7, 2018
by Andrew Jacobs

SANTIAGO, Chile — They killed Tony the Tiger. They did away with Cheetos’ Chester Cheetah. They banned Kinder Surprise, the chocolate eggs with a hidden toy. The Chilean government, facing… Read More

Can Healthcare Avoid “Black Box” Artificial Intelligence Tools?

Health IT Analytics, February 2, 2018
by Jennifer Bresnick, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director) and W. Nicholson Price II (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: Artificial intelligence is taking the healthcare industry by storm as researchers share breakthrough after breakthrough and vendors quickly commercialize advanced algorithms offering… Read More

Research and Communications Associate
Petrie-Flom Center, Harvard Law School

Deadline: This position has been filled.

Duties & ResponsibilitiesReporting to the Petrie-Flom Center’s Administrative Director and working closely with the Center’s Executive Director, Faculty Director, and other staff, the Research… Read More

Stalled Health Programs Await A Green Light On The Hill

Kaiser Health News, February 2, 2018
by Shefali Luthra

With the clock ticking on the current stop-gap bill that funds the federal government through Feb. 8, Congress is steeling itself to consider another must-pass budget bill. And, once again, health care… Read More

Trump’s abandoned promise to bring down drug prices, explained

Vox, February 2, 2018
by Dylan Scott, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: One year into Donald Trump’s presidency, as he delivered his first State of the Union address, he has more or less abandoned his outspoken pledges to bring down the cost of America’s… Read More

The Regulatory Accountability Act of 2017 — Implications for FDA Regulation and Public Health

NEJM, February 1, 2018
by Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus), Erin C. Fuse Brown, and Aaron S. Kesselheim

From the article: In the past year, federal health policy has been characterized by pervasive uncertainty, but a consistent theme from the Trump administration and some prominent legislators has been opposition… Read More

Privacy experts alarmed as Amazon moves into the health care industry

Washington Post, January 30, 2018
by Abha Bhattarai, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article: Amazon.com on Tuesday announced a joint partnership with Berkshire Hathaway and JP Morgan to create an independent health-care company for their employees, putting an end to months… Read More

You can love the brain and football, too

StarTribune, January 31, 2018
by Francis X. Shen (Senior Fellow)

Check out the new op-ed from Francis X. Shen, Senior Fellow in Law and Neuroscience at the Project on Law and Applied Neuroscience, a collaboration between the Center for Law, Brain… Read More

Physicians, ethicists urge Congress not to pass ‘right to try’ legislation

STAT News, February 1, 2018
by Ike Swetlitz reporting on Holly Fernandez Lynch (Former Executive Director and Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Dozens of doctors, medical ethicists, and lawyers are warning Congress that legislation to allow Americans with life-threatening conditions access to unapproved, experimental drugs risks… Read More

Pharmaceutical Advertising in Medical Journals

CHEST, Volume 153, Issue 1
by Michael S. Sinha, Aaron S. Kesselheim, and Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: Marketing efforts across many industries, including the health-care industry, have shifted toward digital advertising through web-based, social media, and mobile application platforms.… Read More

Trump Pledges To Lower Drug Costs — Can We Do It?

NPR, January 31, 2018
by Anthony Brooks, interviewing Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the podcast: President Trump says in his State of the Union that going after the high cost of prescription drugs is a top priority. Politicians have promised for years to bring them down. We’ll… Read More

Petrie-Flom Center launches Project on Precision Medicine, Artificial Intelligence, and the Law

Harvard Law Today, January 31, 2018
by Q & A with I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

The Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School and the Center for Advanced Studies in Biomedical Innovation Law (CeBIL) at the University of… Read More

PFC Spotlight: Academic Fellow Alumnus Matthew J. B. Lawrence

Petrie-Flom Center , January 31, 2018

Matthew J. B. Lawrence was an Academic Fellow from 2010-2013, during which time his research focused on health care reform and health insurance coverage decision-making. Today, he is Assistant… Read More

The Petrie-Flom Center Launches the Innovative Funding Models in Translational Research Project

The Petrie-Flom Center, January 29, 2018

January 30, 2018 - The Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School is launching the Innovative Funding Models in Translational Research Project to… Read More

Health Economist
Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER)

Deadline: Open until filled.

General Description:The Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER) is an innovative, independent non-profit health care research organization dedicated to improving the application of evidence throughout… Read More

Senior Scientist, Health Technology Assessment
Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER)

Deadline: Open until filled.

The Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER) is an innovative, independent non-profit health care research organization dedicated to improving the application of evidence throughout the health… Read More

Legal Director
Health Law Advocates (HLA)

Deadline: Open until filled.

Health Law Advocates (HLA) is a non-profit, public interest law firm committed to ensuring universal access to quality health care in Massachusetts. HLA is seeking a Legal Director to expand its litigation… Read More

The Federal Right to Try Act of 2017

JAMA Internal Medicine, January 22, 2018
by Alison Bateman-House and Christopher T. Robertson (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: In 2017, President Trump said that “one thing that’s always disturbed”1 him is that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) denies access to experimental drugs… Read More

Research Fellow for Precision Medicine
Petrie-Flom Center, Harvard Law School

Deadline: Position has been filled.

Duties & ResponsibilitiesThis is a newly created full-time term appointment for a post-doctoral employee needed to support the work of the Petrie-Flom Center on a sponsored research project in collaboration… Read More

The Petrie-Flom Center Launches New Project

Petrie-Flom Center, January 23, 2018

The Project on Precision Medicine, Artificial Intelligence, and the Law will seek to better understand the frontiers of big data in health care diagnostics, through interdisciplinary analysis of important… Read More

Cops, Docs, and Code: A Dialogue between Big Data in Health Care and Predictive Policing

UC Davis Law Review, Vol. 51, No. 437, 2017
by I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director) and Harry Graver

Abstract: “Big data” has become the ubiquitous watchword of this decade. Predictive analytics, which is something we want to do with big data -- to use of electronic algorithms to forecast… Read More

It’s time to levy penalties for failing to report clinical trial results

STAT, January 17, 2018
by Holly Fernandez Lynch (Academic Fellow Alumna and former Executive Director)

From the article: I started my first job as an attorney in the fall of 2007, days after President George W. Bush signed the Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act (FDAAA) into law. As part… Read More

Tip of the Iceberg II

11 NYU Journal of Law & Liberty 770, January 12, 2018
by Christopher T. Robertson (Academic Fellow Alumnus) and Victor Laurien

Abstract In recent years, the Food and Drug Administration’s pre-market approval process has come under increasing scrutiny as an infringement on liberty and a regulation of speech. In the first… Read More

A New Approach to Treat Childhood Leukemia: Novartis’ CAR-T Therapy

The Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics, January 10, 2018
by Frazer A. Tessema and Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: On August 30, 2017, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced the approval of tisagenlecleucel (Kymriah; CTL019), Novartis' new treatment for B-cell acute lymphoblastic… Read More

Federal Right-to-Try Legislation — Threatening the FDA’s Public Health Mission

NEJM, January 10, 2018
by Steven Joffe and Holly Fernandez Lynch (Academic Fellow Alumna and former Executive Director)

From the article: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is the gatekeeper of the country’s drugs and medical devices. Originally created to prevent the misleading of patients, it was later tasked… Read More

Divorced couple take their fight over frozen embryos to Colorado Supreme Court

ABC News, January 10, 2018
by Andrew Fies, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the story: What happens when the parents who created frozen embryos go to war with each other over whether to procreate with them or destroy them? That's the battle now being waged before the… Read More

Court to weigh if one parent has the right to use frozen embryos if the other objects

Washington Post, January 9, 2018
by Ariana Eunjung Cha, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article: On Tuesday, the Colorado Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in the Rookses' case. Although several other cases have made their way to states' high courts, legal… Read More

PFC Spotlight: Student Fellow Alumna Emily Largent

Petrie-Flom Center, January 9, 2018

Emily Largent, JD, PhD, RN, was Peter Barton Hutt Student Fellow during the 2014-2015 academic year, while a second-year law student at Harvard Law School. Then-Academic Fellow Matthew Lawrence and… Read More

A Big Pharma-funded charity that helps patients pay for drugs just sued the government

Washington Post, January 8, 2018
by Carolyn Y. Johnson, quoting Christopher T. Robertson (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: These charities help patients out, but they also provide a lucrative philanthropic option for donors. Drug companies get reimbursed by government health programs or private… Read More

Drug Policy: The Year In Review, And The Year Ahead

Health Affairs Blog, January 4, 2018
by Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article:  Last year was an unquestionably busy time for health care news of all kinds. Media and policy coverage rightly focused on the many attempts to repeal the Affordable Care Act, but… Read More

India’s Hospitals Are Filling Up With Desperate Americans

Foreign Policy, January 2, 2018
by Daniel Block, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article:  Medical tourism thus presents both opportunities and risks. At its best, the industry can help India grow its health care system, using the revenues generated from international… Read More

This old drug was free. Now it’s $109,500 a year.

The Washington Post, December 18, 2017
by Carolyn Y. Johnson, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: But the price has been on a roller coaster in recent years — zooming from a list price of $50 for a bottle of 100 pills in the early 2000s up to $13,650 in 2015, then plummeting… Read More

Communications Associate
Association for Community Affiliated Plans (ACAP)

Deadline: Open until filled.

POSITION SUMMARY                             The Association… Read More

Speed, Safety, and Industry Funding — From PDUFA I to PDUFA VI

The New England Journal of Medicine, December 7, 2017
by Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus), Jerry Avorn, and Aaron S. Kesselheim

From the paper: In August, President Donald Trump signed into law the sixth version of key legislation for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), known as the Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA VI).… Read More

The FDA’s Expedited Programs and Clinical Development Times for Novel Therapeutics, 2012-2016

JAMA, Issue 318, no. 21
by Thomas J. Hwang, Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus), Aaron S. Kesselheim

From the paper: The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has 4 expedited programs to speed the development and review of drugs treating serious diseases: (1) priority review leads to FDA review in 6 months… Read More

Will inter partes review speed US generic drug entry?

Nature Biotechnology, Issue 35
by Jonathan J Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus), Reed F Beall & Aaron S Kesselheim

From the paper: Patents are ubiquitous in the pharmaceutical industry and are used by brand-name drug manufacturers to prevent low-cost generic competition and maintain high drug prices. Patents are granted… Read More

Explaining the Absence of Surgical Procedure Regulation

Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy, Vol 27, Issue 189
by Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the paper: Each year in the United States, surgeons perform approximately 64 million surgical procedures, ranging from tooth extraction to open heart surgery.2 Yet, notwithstanding the frequency of… Read More

Trump’s zeal for deregulation could gum up the FDA, experts say

STAT, December 20, 2017
by Meghana Keshavan, quoting Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: President Trump quite literally cut a stretch of red tape last week to emphasize his slash-and-burn stance on government deregulation. But what would sweeping regulatory change… Read More

Fellowship in Bioethics
Harvard Medical School Center for Bioethics

Deadline: March 19, 2018

General Description:The Harvard Medical School Fellowship in Bioethics is a one-year, part-time program committed to developing leaders with an expertise in bioethics. The core of the fellowship is a weekly… Read More

Full Professor for Quantitative Methods in Public Health and Health Services Research
UMIT - University for Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology in Tirol, Austria

Deadline: January 31, 2018

General Description:UMIT - University for Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology is an accredited private university owned by the Federal State of Tyrol and the University of Innsbruck with… Read More

Call for PhD Applications
Collaborative Research Programme in Biomedical Innovation Law (CeBIL), University of Copenhagen

Deadline: Open until filled.

About the programmeSupported by a research grant of DKK 35 million from the Novo Nordisk Foundation, the  Collaborative Research Programme in Biomedical Innovation Law (CeBIL) will address and… Read More

Encouraging New Uses for Old Drugs

JAMA, December 4, 2017
by Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna), Paul B. Ginsburg, and Dana P. Goldman

From the paper: US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of a new drug typically coincides with a period of patent protection, during which the manufacturer will often apply for additional indications… Read More

Sanofi scandal in the Philippines could spread dangerous mistrust of vaccines

STAT, December 11, 2017
by Ed Silverman, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article: Unfortunately, there are indications that the company, which could use a blockbuster product, should have taken its corporate foot off the gas pedal.  And to restore confidence in… Read More

Regulating Black-Box Medicine

Michigan Law Review, Vol. 116, Issue 3
by W. Nicholson Price II (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the paper: Data drive modern medicine. And our tools to analyze those data are growing ever more powerful. As health data are collected in greater and greater amounts, sophisticated algorithms based… Read More

2018-2019 Postdoctoral Research Fellowship
Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM), University of Michigan-Ann Arbor

Deadline: January 12, 2018

The Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine (CBSSM), a multidisciplinary research unit sponsored by the University of Michigan Medical School Dean's Office, the Office of Clinical Affairs,… Read More

2018 Health Law & Policy Summer Internship
Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation of Harvard Law School (CHLPI)

Deadline: January 27, 2018

GENERAL DESCRIPTION:The Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation of Harvard Law School (CHLPI) advocates for legal, regulatory, and policy reforms to improve the health of underserved populations,… Read More

2017’s Word Of The Year In Health Law And Bioethics: Uncertainty

Health Affairs, December 8, 2017
by Carmel Shachar (Executive Director) and I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

Note: This post is the first in a series of Health Affairs posts from the Sixth Annual Health Law Year in P/Review event, held at Harvard Law School on Tuesday, December 12, 2017. … Read More

Manager, Health Policy
Chan Zuckerberg Initiative

Deadline: Open until filled.

The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative is dedicated to advancing human potential and promoting equal opportunity through technology, grantmaking, impact investing, policy, and advocacy work. We look for bold ideas… Read More

The Health 202

The Washington Post, November 30, 2017
by Paige Winfield Cunninghamm, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: If the opioid epidemic was simply a problem of supply – people being able to access drugs too easily – than a targeted new effort in Appalachia announced… Read More

Research Fellow
Center for Public Health Law, Temple University

Deadline: Open until filled (rolling admissions)

The Center for Public Health Law Research (CPHLR) supports the widespread adoption of scientific tools and methods for mapping and evaluating the impact of law on health. The Center works by developing… Read More

NOW AVAILABLE! Big Data, Health Law, and Bioethics

Cambridge University Press, Forthcoming, March 2018
by Edited by I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director), Holly Fernandez Lynch (former Executive Director), Urs Gasser, and Effy Vayena

This edited volume stems from the Petrie-Flom Center’s 2016 annual conference, which brought together leading experts to identify the various ways in which law and ethics intersect with… Read More

Germ-Line Gene Editing and Congressional Reaction in Context

Journal of Law and Health, Vol. 30 (2017), Issue 1
by Russell A. Spivak, I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director), and Eli Y. Adashi

Abstract: On December 18, 2015, President Obama signed into law a policy rider forestalling the therapeutic modification of the human germ line. The rider, motivated by the science’s potential unethical… Read More

The Debate over Postmortem Sperm Retrieval of Fallen Soldiers

Jerusalem Post, November 22, 2017
by Avishalom Westreich (Visiting Scholar Alumnus)

This essay is based in part on the workshop the Petrie-Flom Center hosted on October 23, 2017, in which then-Visiting Scholar Avishalom Westreich presented his research-in-progress to a diverse group of… Read More

Digital pill offers chance of new life to old drugs

Financial Times, November 22, 2017
by FT Staff, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article: Amid broader concerns about how medical information may be used, Proteus says that its product complies with “all applicable laws and standards” on data protection. Patients… Read More

Harvard Forum: Should Older Politicians And Judges Be Tested For Mental Decline?

WBUR, November 17, 2017
by Carey Goldberg, describing the "Dementia and Democracy" event

This article describes the event "Dementia and Democracy: America's Aging Judges and Politicians," held on November 15, 2017 at Harvard Law School.  The speculation spreads every… Read More

First Digital Pill Approved to Worries About Biomedical ‘Big Brother’

New York Times, November 13, 2017
by Pam Belluck, featuring I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

For the first time, the Food and Drug Administration has approved a digital pill — a medication embedded with a sensor that can tell doctors whether, and when, patients take their medicine. The approval,… Read More

Ohio’s Drug-Pricing Ballot Question Triggers Voter Confusion

Kaiser Health News, November 7, 2017
by By Shefali Luthra, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Drug pricing is complex and already has caused head-scratching among policymakers and academics, noted Rachel Sachs, an associate professor of law at Washington University in St. Louis,… Read More