Ryan says Republicans to target welfare, Medicare, Medicaid spending in 2018

Washington Post, December 6, 2017
by Jeff Stein

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.) said Wednesday that congressional Republicans will aim next year to reduce spending on both federal health care and anti-poverty programs, citing the need to reduce… Read More

Pace Of U.S. Health Spending Slows In 2016

Kaiser Health News, December 6, 2017
by Phil Galewitz

U.S. health spending rose to $3.3 trillion in 2016, but the pace slowed compared to the previous two years as demand for drugs, hospital care and physician services weakened, according to a federal… Read More

GOP eyes post-tax-cut changes to welfare, Medicare and Social Security

Washington Post, December 1, 2017
by Jeff Stein

High-ranking Republicans are hinting that, after their tax overhaul, the party intends to look at cutting spending on welfare, entitlement programs such as Social Security and Medicare, and other… Read More

Republican Tax Bill Proves Congress Wasn’t Done With Health Policy

Kaiser Health News, December 1, 2017

KHN Morning Briefing: Summaries of health policy coverage from major news organizations The GOP tax plan includes a range of health-related provisions -- key among them is language that would eliminate… Read More

Heated And Deep-Pocketed Battle Erupts Over 340B Drug Discount Program

Kaiser Health News, November 28, 2017
by Sarah Jane Tribble

A 25-year-old federal drug discount program has grown so big and controversial that it faces a fight for survival as federal officials and lawmakers furiously debate the program’s reach. The program,… Read More

Threat To Medicare Funding In GOP Tax Plan Roils Capitol Hill

Kaiser Health News, November 16, 2017

KHN Morning Briefing: Summaries of health policy coverage from major news organizations The tax bill, a priority for the Republican majority in Congress, would likely raise the deficit and that would… Read More

Some States Roll Back ‘Retroactive Medicaid,’ A Buffer For The Poor — And For Hospitals

Kaiser Health News, November 14, 2017
by Michelle Andrews

If you’re poor, uninsured and fall seriously ill, in most states if you qualify for Medicaid — but weren’t enrolled at the time — the program will pay your medical bills going back… Read More

Trump Health Agency Challenges Consensus on Reducing Costs

New York Times, November 12, 2017
by Abby Goodnough and Kate Zernike

WASHINGTON — For several decades, a consensus has grown that reining in the United States’ $3.2 trillion annual medical bill begins with changing the way doctors are paid: Instead of compensating… Read More

Maine Governor Balks At Expanding Medicaid Even After Voters Had Their Say

Kaiser Health News, November 9, 2017

KHN Morning Briefing: Summaries of health policy coverage from major news organizations Gov. Paul LePage (R), who has vetoed similar plans five times, says his administration will only implement expansion… Read More

Medicaid’s Best-Price Rule May Not Be Such a Big Problem

Physician's Weekly, October 23, 2017
by Physician's Weekly, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Rachel Sachs, J.D., M.P.H., from Washington University in St. Louis, and colleagues discussed Medicaid’s “best-price rule” and the extent to which it might frustrate… Read More

Axios Vitals post from October 4

Axios, October 4, 2017
by By Sam Baker, featuring work by Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the post: Medicaid and value-based drug deals: New research casts some doubt on the pharmaceutical industry's claim that Medicaid's "best-price" rule inhibits its ability to create contracts… Read More

Administering Health Innovation

Cardozo Law Review, Forthcoming 2018
by Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

Abstract Scholars and policymakers have recently begun to focus on the role federal agencies charged with health-related missions can play in the development of innovative health technologies and promotion… Read More

Academic Fellow Alum Matthew J. B. Lawrence Joins Faculty at Dickinson Law (Penn State)

Dickinson Law, Penn State University, August 1, 2017

Matthew J.B. Lawrence has joined the faculty of Penn State’s Dickinson Law as assistant professor of law. An expert in the fields of health law and administrative law, Lawrence will teach Health… Read More

From the Technical to the Personal: Teaching and Learning Health Insurance Regulation and Reform

Saint Louis University Law Journal, Vol. 61, no. 411
by Allison K. Hoffman (Academic Fellow Alumna), Whitney A. Brown, and Lindsay Cutler

From the article: In the Fall of 2016, I taught Health Law and Policy for the fourth consecutive semester. In this repeat loop, one thing has become increasingly clear: the aspect of this survey course… Read More

Analyst in Health Policy
Library of Congress

Deadline: June 08, 2017

General Description The Congressional Research Service (CRS) seeks two Analysts in Health Policy to join its Domestic Social Policy Division (DSP). Applicants should have experience conducting analysis… Read More

Louisiana proposes tapping a century-old patent law to cut hepatitis C drug prices

Kaiser Health News, May 2, 2017
by Sarah Jane Tribble, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Rachel Sachs, an associate professor of law at Washington University in St. Louis who attended the recent Johns Hopkins meeting, said she believes “the case is strong” in… Read More

Harnessing the U.S. Taxpayer to Fight Cancer and Make Profits

New York Times, December 19, 2016
by Matt Richtel and Andrew Pollack, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow alumna)

From the article: Rachel Sachs, an associate law professor at Washington University in St. Louis and expert in innovation policy, said the government had every right to seek price concessions. She noted… Read More

Senate committee calls for ban on surgeons conducting simultaneous operations

Boston Globe, December 6, 2016
by Jonathan Salzman and Jenn Abelson

From the article: A powerful Senate committee wants all hospitals to explicitly ban surgeons from overseeing two simultaneous operations, weighing in on a controversy that has roiled Massachusetts General… Read More

Proposition 61 Gives California Mandate To Lower Drug Prices, Not Tools

KPBS Midday Edition, October 31, 2016
by Ben Bradford, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Proposition 61 would require Medi-Cal to get VA prices for about 3 million of its patients (it excludes other Medi-Cal patients, who are on managed care plans). Rachel Sachs, a law professor… Read More

Student Fellow Alumna Lauren Taylor on the American Health Care Paradox

Center for Bioethics, Harvard Medical School, October 27, 2016

Lauren A. Taylor, MPH, MDiv will discuss her book,  The American Health Care Paradox: Why Spending More is Getting Us Less. Commentator: John E. McDonough, DrPH, MPA, Professor… Read More

Contrived Threats v. Uncontrived Warnings

83 University of Chicago Law Review 503, 2016
by Einer Elhauge (Founding Faculty Director)

Abstract: Contractual duress, unconstitutional conditions, and blackmail have long been puzzling. The puzzle is why these doctrines sometimes condemn threatening lawful action to induce agreements… Read More

Prizing Insurance: Prescription Drug Insurance as Innovation Incentive,

Harvard Journal of Law and Technology, Vol. 30, No. 1 (forthcoming)
by Rachel E. Sachs

Abstract:  A problem perennially facing scholars of both intellectual property and health law is the need to incentivize appropriately the development of new pharmaceuticals. Although physicians have… Read More

Innovations in Health Law and Policy: Regulatory Challenges and Strategies for Change Conference

UNH School of Law, October 26, 2015
by W. Nicholson Price II (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

Innovations in Health Law and Policy: Regulatory Challenges and Strategies for Change When: Monday, October 26, 2015 Where: UNH School of Law 2 White Street Concord, New Hampshire Presented by the Health… Read More

How Prescription Drugs Get So Wildly Expensive

WIRED, September 23, 2015
by Nick Stockton, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow)

From the article: [...] With all that in mind, here’s the important question: Is Shkreli an industry outlier, or was he just unlucky enough to be found out? “There’s one aspect… Read More

Practice Associate
Medicaid Accountable Care Organization Demonstration Project, Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers

Deadline: December 01, 2014

Overview The Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers is a 501c3 that is engaged in a three year Medicaid Accountable Care Organization Demonstration Project. Through the ACO, the Coalition is working… Read More

Was the Medicaid Expansion Coercive?

Routledge, 2014
by I. Glenn Cohen (Petrie-Flom Faculty Co-Director)

In The Affordable Care Act Decision: Philosophical and Legal Implications, Fritz Allhoff and Mark Hall, eds. In this book chapter on the ACA decision, NFIB v. Sebelius, I focus on the Court's… Read More