Mental Health Treatment Denied to Customers by Giant Insurer’s Policies, Judge Rules

New York Times, March 5, 2019
by Reed Abelson

In a scathing decision released Tuesday, a federal judge in Northern California ruled that a unit of UnitedHealth Group, the giant health insurer, had created internal policies aimed at effectively discriminating… Read More

“Mom, When They Look at Me, They See Dollar Signs”

Mother Jones, March/April 2019 issue
by Julia Lurie

[...] The addiction community has a name for what happened to Brianne. It’s called the “Florida shuffle,” a cycle wherein recovering users are wooed aggressively by rehabs and freelance… Read More

‘Church Of Safe Injection’ Offers Needles, Naloxone To Prevent Opioid Overdoses

WBUR (NPR Boston), February 12, 2019
by Deborah Becker

On a bitter cold afternoon in front of the central bus stop in Bangor, Maine, about a half-dozen people recently surrounded a folding table covered with handmade signs offering free clean syringes, coffee… Read More

Health plans don’t want patients on opioids.

Politico, February 12, 2019
by Paul Demko

The national effort to curb the opioid crisis faces another big potential obstacle — insurers who won’t pay for less-addictive ways to control patients’ pain. Patients seeking other pain… Read More

U.S. Prosecutors Sue To Stop Nation’s First Supervised Injection Site For Opioids

NPR, February 6, 2019
by Bobby Allyn

After months of threats, federal prosecutors in Philadelphia launched a legal challenge on Wednesday against the nonprofit Safehouse, which is hoping to open what could be the nation's first site where… Read More

Massachusetts Attorney General Implicates Family Behind Purdue Pharma In Opioid Deaths

WBUR, January 16, 2019
by Christine Willmsen and Martha Bebinger

The Sackler family behind Purdue Pharma knew that its painkiller OxyContin was causing overdoses, yet continued to cash in as deaths mounted, the Massachusetts attorney general alleges in court documents… Read More

edX Course: The Opioid Crisis in America
Harvard University

Deadline: Class begins March 27, 2017

About this courseOpioids are a class of drugs that include the illegal drug heroin as well as powerful pain relievers, such as oxycodone, hydrocodone, codeine, morphine, fentanyl and many others. Every… Read More

What’s Confusing Us About Mental Health Parity

HealthAffairs Blog, December 22, 2016
by Nathaniel Counts (Student Fellow alumnus), Timothy Clement, Amanda Mauri, Paul Gionfriddo, and Garry Carneal

The Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (MHPAEA) has been law since 2008. MHPAEA provided that health plans could not limit mental health or substance use disorder benefits in a way… Read More

Scholars Discuss Role of Neuroscience in Youth Criminal Justice

Harvard Crimson, September 29, 2015
by Jonah S. Lefkoe

Check out the Harvard Crimson's summary of our first event of the year, "From Trouble Teens to Tsarnaev: Promises and Perils of Adolescent Neuroscience and the Law."  This event was part… Read More

Senior Fellow for Law & Neuroscience Amanda Pustilnik Guest Lecturing in HLS Seminar

Petrie-Flom, January 21, 2015

As part of her work with the Petrie-Flom Center and Center for Law Brain and Behavior at MGH's Project on Law and Applied Neuroscience, Senior Fellow Amanda C. Pustilnik will be a regular guest lecturer… Read More

Houston doctor sued for trading prescriptions for sex

Houston Chronicle, December 12, 2014
by St. John Barned-Smith, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

[...] Legal experts who specialize in medical ethics said the allegations and actions captured on film were "egregious." Medical standards prohibit doctors from engaging in sexual relationships with patients.… Read More

California Counties Sue 5 Narcotics Makers

Here & Now, NPR, May 22, 2014
by Robin Young interviewing I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

Two counties in California — Orange and Santa Clara — are suing five major drug companies, accusing them of causing the growing prescription drug epidemic across the country. The complaint,… Read More