The Petrie-Flom Center and Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics Fellow-in-Residence
Petrie-Flom Center, Harvard Law School, and Edmond J. Safra Center, Harvard University

Deadline: November 15, 2018

Each year the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University hosts several fellows-in-residence. For 2019-20, they are concentrating their fellowships on the Ethics of Technological… Read More

Call for Abstracts: 2019 Petrie-Flom Center Annual Conference: Consuming Genetics
Petrie-Flom Center, Harvard Law School

Deadline: Closed.

The call for abstracts for the 2019 annual conference is now closed. The conference agenda will be posted in late fall 2018 to the conference website. Consuming Genetics: The Ethical and Legal Considerations… Read More

2018-2019 Petrie-Flom Center Student Fellowship
Harvard Law School

Deadline: August 10, 2018

The Center and Student FellowshipThe Petrie-Flom Center Student Fellowship Program is designed to mentor students seeking to become thought leaders in health law policy and bioethics. The fellowship supports… Read More

2017-2018 Petrie-Flom Center Student Fellowship
Harvard Law School

Deadline: August 11, 2017

The deadline for applications for the 2017-2018 fellowship is now closed.  The Center and Student Fellowship.The Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics is an interdisciplinary… Read More

Health Plans For State Employees Use Medicare’s Hammer On Hospital Bills

NPR, March 20, 2019
by Julie Appleby

States. They're just as perplexed as the rest of us over the ever-rising cost of health care premiums. Now some states –including Montana, North Carolina and Oregon — are moving… Read More

In Efforts To Halt Teen Vaping…

Kaiser Health News, March 20, 2019

KHN Morning Briefing: Summaries of health policy coverage from major news organizations Even after Altria and Juul said they'll take extra efforts to prevent teens from getting addicted, outgoing… Read More

Differential payment to research participants in the same study: an ethical analysis

BMJ, March 7, 2019
by by Govind Persad, Holly Fernandez Lynch (Former Executive Director), Emily Largent (Student Fellow Alumna)

From the abstract:  Recognising that offers of payment to research participants can serve various purposes—reimbursement, compensation and incentive—helps uncover differences between participants,… Read More

Medical AI and Contextual Bias

Harvard Journal of Law & Technology , Spring 2019
by by W. Nicholson Price (Academic Fellow Alum)

From the abstract:  Artificial intelligence will transform medicine. One particularly attractive possibility is the democratization of medical expertise. If black-box medical algorithms can be trained… Read More

FDA Commissioner’s Decision To Resign At End Of Month Catches Washington, Industry By Surprise

Kaiser Health News, March 6, 2019

KHN Morning Briefing: Summaries of health policy coverage from major news organizations FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb will resign after nearly two years in the post because he misses his family.… Read More

Planned Parenthood, American Medical Association sue Trump administration over abortion ‘gag rule’

Washington Post, March 5, 2019
by Ariana Eunjung Cha

The Planned Parenthood Federation of America and the American Medical Association have filed a lawsuit to block a new federal rule that would prohibit clinics participating in a program for low-income… Read More

Big Doctor Group Supports Medicare And Medicaid ‘Buy Ins’

Forbes, February 28, 2019
by Bruce Japsen

The nation’s largest primary care doctor group supports Medicare and Medicaid expansions that include a ‘buy in’ for those looking to gain health coverage under the age of 65. The American… Read More

​Background Check Bill Passes House, But Dems Are Still Moving Cautiously When Picking Their Gun Saf

Kaiser Health News, February 28, 2019

KHN Morning Briefing: Summaries of health policy coverage from major news organizations The House passed legislation on Wednesday that would expand background checks to all gun sales, a bill that's… Read More

There’s A New ‘Medicare-For-All’ Bill In The House

Kaiser Health News, February 27, 2019
by Shefali Luthra

Members of the House on Wednesday offered their version of a “Medicare-for-all” bill that is broader than what’s been put forth by Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), whose 2016 presidential… Read More

In Florida, Drug Importation From Canada Finds New Champions, Old Snags

Kaiser Health News, February 25, 2019
by by Shefali Luthra and Phil Galewitz, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: "And how much would these programs help anyway? While statehouses may be abuzz, in Washington, national politics impedes feasibility. And skeptics question how much relief these initiatives… Read More

Evaluating New Rules on Transparency in Cancer Research and Drug Development

JAMA Oncology, February 21, 2019
by by Thomas J. Hwang, Kerstin N. Vokinger, and Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: "Transparency in the development of new medicines has the potential to improve the efficiency and quality of clinical research by allowing investigators and companies to learn from successes… Read More

Do You Want to Be Pregnant? It’s Not Always a Yes-or-No Answer

New York Times, February 15, 2019
by Margot Sanger-Katz and Claire Cain Miller

For decades, researchers and physicians tended to think about pregnancies as either planned or unplanned. But new data reveals that for a significant group of women, their feelings don’t neatly fit… Read More

World Health Organization Forms Committee To Guide Editing Of Human Genes

NPR, February 14, 2019

The World Health Organization Thursday announced the formation of an international committee aimed at establishing uniform guidelines for editing human DNA in ways that can be passed down to future generations.… Read More

Can California Beat The Federal Government In Lowering Drug Prices?

Kaiser Health News, February 14, 2019
by By Samantha Young, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: "Lawmakers face an array of challenges that make reform hard, such as secretive drug pricing and the political influence of the pharmaceutical industry, one of the most powerful lobbies… Read More

Sanders to Gables pharma firm: Why are you charging $375,000 for life-saving drug?

Miami Herald, February 6, 2019
by by Rob Wile, quoting W. Nicholson Price (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: "Nicholson Price, an assistant professor at the University of Michigan who specializes in law surrounding innovation in the life sciences, said Catalyst would likely counter by saying… Read More

Shadow health records meet new data privacy laws

Science, February 1, 2019
by by W. Nicholson Price (Academic Fellow Alumnus), Margot E. Kaminski, Timo Minssen (Former Visiting Scholar), Kayte Spector-Bagdad

From the article: "Large sets of health data can enable innovation and quality measurement but can also create technical challenges and privacy risks. When entities such as health plans and health care… Read More

Court allows House Democrats to join Obamacare’s defense

Politico, February 14, 2019
by Alice Miranda Ollstein

A federal appeals court is allowing House Democrats to defend Obamacare in a lawsuit threatening the future of the health care law. The 5th Circuit Court of Appeals today granted the House’s petition… Read More

Can You Sue An Algorithm For Malpractice?

Forbes AI, February 11, 2019
by by Forbes AI, interviewing W. Nicholson Price (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: "What’s in the box? The “black box,” that is. Increasingly, doctors are relying on sophisticated, and at times inscrutable, algorithms to make healthcare recommendations—a… Read More

U.S. Prosecutors Sue To Stop Nation’s First Supervised Injection Site For Opioids

NPR, February 6, 2019
by Bobby Allyn

After months of threats, federal prosecutors in Philadelphia launched a legal challenge on Wednesday against the nonprofit Safehouse, which is hoping to open what could be the nation's first site where… Read More

Trump Highlights Health Agenda With Vow To Lower ‘Unfair’ Drug Prices

Kaiser Health News, February 6, 2019
by Julie Rovner

It was not the centerpiece, but health was a persistent theme in President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address at the Capitol on Tuesday night. Although the administration has focused more… Read More

More light needed on medical “shadow records” and “black box” tools, U-M experts say

IHPI News Blog, February 6, 2019
by by IHPI, quoting W. Nicholson Price (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the post: "When shadow record elements from many people are pooled together and used by academic researchers or industry, they can fuel progress in health care research and innovation, says the international… Read More

How Trump’s Latest Plan to Cut Drug Prices Will Affect You

New York Times, February 5, 2019
by By Katie Thomas and Reed Abelson, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: "The Trump administration says that a lot will depend on how companies react. If the plan takes effect next year, it could cost the government an extra $2.8 billion to $13.5 billion that… Read More

Trump wants to slash drug rebate deals. Will it make a difference?

ABC News, February 4, 2019
by by Jay Hancock, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: "In any event, it’s hardly a pure win for seniors or patients in general. Consumers are unlikely to collect the full benefit of eliminated rebates. At the same time, the change… Read More

The Fight To Lower Soaring Drug Prices Turns Bitter Between States And The Feds

Huffington Post, February 4, 2019
by By Michael Ollove, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: "According to the National Institute on Money and Politics, a nonprofit that collects campaign finance data, the pharmaceutical industry in 2018 contributed nearly $19 million to state… Read More

Winners And Losers Under Bold Trump Plan To Slash Drug Rebate Deals

Kaiser Health News, February 1, 2019
by By Jay Hancock, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: "In any event, it’s hardly a pure win for seniors or patients in general. Consumers are unlikely to collect the full benefit of eliminated rebates. At the same time, the change… Read More

The rebate rule is here

POLITICO Pulse, February 1, 2019
by by Dan Diamond, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: "Pharmacy benefit managers are likely to fight efforts to change the kickback exemption, which has been in place since Medicare Part D’s inception, said Sean Dickson of Pew Charitable… Read More

Trump Administration Releases Long-Awaited Drug Rebate Proposal

HealthAffairs, February 1, 2019
by by Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: "Yesterday, the Trump Administration released a proposed rule which aims to eliminate rebates from pharmaceutical companies to pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs) in Medicare Part… Read More

A User-Focused Transdisciplinary Research Agenda for AI-Enabled Health Tech Governance

AI-Health Working Group White Paper, January, 2019
by David Arney, Max Senges, Sara Gerke et al

From the abstract:   AI-enabled health technology holds significant promise for improving health outcomes and clinical workflows. However, it also generates challenges for health data governance… Read More

Trump proposal would upend drug industry by overhauling rebates in Medicare

CNN, January 31, 2019
by By Tami Luhby, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: "The Trump administration unveiled a proposal Thursday that could radically change the way many drugs are priced and paid for in Medicare and Medicaid. The plan calls for effectively… Read More

Drugmakers Drag Feet as Congress Drills Into Prescription Prices

Bloomberg Government, January 31, 2019
by By Alex Ruoff and Jeannie Baumann, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: "'Pharmaceutical companies look at what happened to Martin Shkreli and Heather Bresch at Mylan and they don’t want their company to be the face of this year’s drug pricing… Read More

The Lumbering Crawl Toward Human Germline Editing

Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics, January 10, 2019
by by Eli Y. Adashi and I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article:  It is in the nature of novelty that consensus is hard to come by. Such is clearly the lot of groundbreaking biomedical advances. History is no stranger to this phenomenon. The prospect… Read More

Trump birth control coverage rules blocked nationwide

AP, January 14, 2019
by Marc Levy

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — A federal judge on Monday put a nationwide hold on Trump administration rules that allow more employers to opt out of providing women with no-cost birth control. U.S. District… Read More

Petrie-Flom Center Seeks RA for Project on Drug Pricing

Petrie-Flom Center, Applications due January 25!

Call for Applications: Research Assistant, Drug Pricing in the U.S. and GloballyThe Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School seeks a Research Assistant… Read More

Call for Applications: Research Assistant, Drug Pricing in the U.S. and Globally
Petrie-Flom Center, Harvard Law School

Deadline: January 25, 2019

Description:The Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School seeks a current Harvard graduate student to serve as Research Assistant in support of the… Read More

How Chummy Are Junk Food Giants and China’s Health Officials?

New York Times, January 9, 2019
by Andrew Jacobs

Happy 10 Minutes, a Chinese government campaign that encouraged schoolchildren to exercise for 10 minutes a day, would seem a laudable step toward improving public health in a nation struggling with alarming… Read More

Prescription Drug Costs Driven By Manufacturer Price Hikes, Not Innovation

NPR, January 7, 2019
by Alison Kodjak

The skyrocketing cost of many prescription drugs in the U.S. can be blamed primarily on price increases, not expensive new therapies or improvements in existing medications as drug companies frequently… Read More

All seven of the FDA’s recent commissioners agree it should be independent

STAT, January 7, 2019
by Ike Swetlitz

WASHINGTON — Nearly every person who’s run the Food and Drug Administration in recent history agrees the agency should break free from its political supervisors — a rare consensus from… Read More

House Democrats make Day 1 largely about health care

Politico Pulse, January 4, 2019
by by Dan Diamond, featuring work by Rachel Sachs

From the article: "In Health Affairs, Rachel Sachs reviews the looming prescription drug policy issues." Read more here! Read More

FDA Accuses Juul and Altria of Backing Off Plan to Stop Youth Vaping

New York Times, January 4, 2019
by Sheila Kaplan

WASHINGTON — The Food and Drug Administration is accusing Juul and Altria of reneging on promises they made to the government to keep e-cigarettes away from minors. Dr. Scott Gottlieb, the agency’s… Read More

Drug makers resist pressure from Washington on prices

CNN, January 3, 2019
by by Tami Lubhy, quoting Rachel Sachs

From the article: "Much of what the Department of Health & Human Services has done so far consists of putting forward proposals, largely involving what Medicare will pay for medications. One of… Read More

Drug makers resist pressure from Washington on prices

CNN, January 3, 2019
by by Tami Lubhy, quoting Rachel Sachs

From the article: "Much of what the Department of Health & Human Services has done so far consists of putting forward proposals, largely involving what Medicare will pay for medications. One of… Read More

An export-only exception to pharmaceutical patents in Europe: should the United States follow suit?

Nature Biotechnology, January 3, 2019
by Timo Minssen (Former Visiting Scholar), Aaron S. Kesselheim, and Jonathan Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: "A new European Union policy could increase the supply of legitimate pharmaceuticals in developing countries and thereby minimize the problem of counterfeit medicines, but many challenges… Read More

A Smarter Way to Provide Epinephrine at School

JAMA Pediatrics, December 21, 2018
by by Austin Frakt and Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article:  Despite the years-long public outcry over high prescription drug prices, public concern has not yet coalesced into major policy change. As a result, Americans remain uncomfortable… Read More

Health as a Human Right, Medicare for All, and the Evolution of the American Health Care Debate

Take Care Blog, December 11, 2018
by By Carmel Shachar (Executive Director), Alex Pearlman (Communications Manager) and I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article: The United States famously does not have an explicit federal constitutional right to health. By contract, the “enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health”… Read More

AVAILABLE FOR PRE-ORDER! Transparency in Health and Health Care in the United States

Cambridge University Press, Forthcoming June 2019
by Holly Fernandez Lynch, I. Glenn Cohen, Carmel Shachar, and Barbara J. Evans (eds.)

This edited volume stems from the Petrie-Flom Center’s 2017 annual conference, which brought together leading experts to reach better understandings of this health policy buzzword, recognizing… Read More

An Inside Look at Apple’s Biggest Step Yet in Health Care

Time, December 6, 2018
by by Alex Fitzpatrick, quoting W. Nicholson Price (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: "In the long run, however, it’s privacy concerns that have the biggest potential to hamper tech companies’ health dreams. News of data breaches that expose consumers’… Read More

The Ethics of Heritable Genome Editing

JAMA, December 3, 2018
by Eli Y. Adashi and I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article:  Editing the genome of human gametes or embryos is a disruptive unactualized technology and continues to be the subject of a wide range of concerns. The chief concern is the… Read More

Something Happened to U.S. Drug Costs in the 1990s

New York Times, November 12, 2018
by Austin Frakt quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: “Other countries decline to pay for a drug when the price is too high,” said Rachel Sachs, who studies drug pricing and regulation as an associate professor of law at Washington… Read More

Regulatory Collaboration Is Key to Public Health Success

The Regulatory Review, October 26, 2018
by Benjamin Barsky, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: "Federal policymakers have recently made a push to address excessive drug price increases and slow medicine development as part of their health care agenda. But the… Read More

Expansion of the Medicare 340B Payment Program

JAMA, November 16, 2018
by Peter B. Bach and Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article:  "The 340B program began as a means to lower the cost of outpatient medications for a small set of underresourced health care facilities that served primarily low-income patients,… Read More

Trump prescription medication plan drawing skepticism

Boston Herald, November 3, 2018
by Alexi Cohan, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Part of the proposal includes adopting an international pricing index for reimbursement that is based off the cost of certain drugs in other countries. This would lower the cost here… Read More

Colorado Supreme Court Quotes I. Glenn Cohen

by Justice William W. Hood III, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

The Colorado Supreme Court in a dissent by Justice Hood, joined Coats and Samour, quotes I. Glenn Cohen.  From the dissent:  For the non-consenting donor, there are several harms that may… Read More

Colorado Supreme Court creates rules for divorced couples divided over fate of their frozen embryos

The Denver Post, October 29, 2018
by Elise Schmelzer, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article:  While other states have considered similar cases, the guidelines issued by the Colorado court are some of the most specific created by any state on the issue, said Glenn Cohen,… Read More

The Health 202: There will be a big fight over Trump’s new proposal to lower drug prices

Washington Post, October 26, 2018
by Paige Winfield Cunningham, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: But the plan does signify the administration is serious about taking action on drug prices. The Obama administration made a similar effort, which it ultimately abandoned under… Read More

Administration Outlines Plan To Lower Pharmaceutical Prices In Medicare Part B

Health Affairs, October 26, 2018
by Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Yesterday, the Trump Administration outlined a plan that, if implemented, could significantly lower the prices of pharmaceuticals through Medicare Part B. The plan… Read More

Trump leans into midterms with a pitch to un-rig Medicare drug prices

CNN Politics, October 25, 2018
by Tami Luhby and Lauren Fox, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article:  While Trump officials could use an Obamacare-created innovation center to pilot new payment proposals, it would have to take a hard stance on prices. "We don't negotiate because… Read More

Coming today: Trump’s most aggressive drug pricing move yet

Politico, October 25, 2018
by Dan Diamond, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Some policy experts cheered Trump's ideas, although they had questions about how the plan would work — "If companies won't sell to Medicare at the benchmark price,… Read More

Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “The Ethics of Smart Pills and Self-Acting Devices

American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 18, October 2018
by Craig M. Klugman, Laura B. Dunn, Jack Schwartz and I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article:  We thank all of the insightful authors who wrote open peer commentaries to further the conversation about digital medicine that we raised in our article, “The Ethics of Smart… Read More

Senators question basis for FDA’s digital health pre-cert pilot

Medical Design and Outsourcing, October 12, 2018
by Chris Newmarker, featuring work by I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article:  In another post on Aug. 16, 2017, on Health Affairs, Nathan G. Cortez, Nicolas Terry, and I. Glenn Cohen described the pre-cert program as “an experiment… Read More

The exciting new idea hospitals have to bring down drug prices

Vox, October 8, 2018
by Dylan Scott, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article:  To fully appreciate the scope of the generic drug pricing problem, remember that the Justice Department and 45 states are currently in court accusing generic drug makers of… Read More

Outbreak Week: How prepared are we for the next health crisis?

Harvard Law Today, October 5, 2018

From the article:  Outbreak Week, led by the Harvard Global Health Institute, was a unique multidisciplinary effort investigating and engaging with epidemic and pandemic preparedness in the 21st century.… Read More

When Your Dreams of Motherhood Are Destroyed

Marie Claire, October 1, 2018
by Kayla Webley Adler, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article:  Neither major political party is expected to push for more regulation. Democrats aren’t likely to touch fertility because of how close the issue is to the abortion debate.… Read More

When Markets Fail: Patents and Infectious Disease Products

Food and Drug Law Journal, September 2018, Volume 73, Number 3
by Jonathan J. Darrow, Michael S. Sinha, and Aaron S. Kesselheim

From the abstract:  New antibiotics and vaccines aimed at treating or preventing infectious diseases can be highly valuable public health innovations, particularly when these products address… Read More

Gilead to launch authorized generics of two HCV drugs

Chemical and Engineering News, September 26, 2018
by Lisa M. Jarvis, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: The effect on costs for patients and overall spending remains to be seen. “It’s unlikely this will result in lower government spending because this is what governments were… Read More

Petrie-Flom Center and Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics Fellow-in-Residence

Petrie-Flom Center, Applications Due: November 15, 2018

Each year the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics at Harvard University hosts several fellows-in-residence. For 2019-20, they are concentrating their fellowships on the Ethics of Technological… Read More

Oversight of Patient-Centered Outcomes Research: Recommendations From a Delphi Panel

Annals of Internal Medicine, September 25, 2018
by Luke Gelinas (Senior Fellow), Joel S. Weissman, Holly Fernandez Lynch, Avni Gupta, Ronen Rozenblum, Emily A. Largent,I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the abstract:  A key aim of patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR) is to generate data that are important to patients by deliberately and extensively involving them in all aspects of research,… Read More

Big questions raised by big data

Harvard Law Today, September 20, 2018
by Lewis Rice, featuring Carmel Shachar (Executive Director) and I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article:  During the introduction to the book launch event for “Big Data, Health Law, and Bioethics,” one of the editors, Harvard Law School Professor I. Glenn… Read More

A pharma exec raised the price of antibiotic by 400 percent — and the government can’t do much about

Stat Plus, September 11, 2018
by Ike Swetlitz and Nicholas Florko, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the article:  Three years after Martin Shkreli became the poster boy of pharmaceutical company greed, another drug company executive is setting himself up for a similar infamy. And… Read More

A Setback For Massachusetts In States’ Drive To Contain Medicaid Drug Spending

NPR Shots/WBUR, September 12, 2018
by Martha Bebinger, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article:  States serve as "laboratories of democracy," as U.S. Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis famously said. And states are also labs for health policy, launching all kinds of experiments… Read More

Generic Drugmakers Embrace Inter Partes Review Process

RAPS Regulatory Focus , September 4, 2018
by Zachary Brennan. quoting Jonathan Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the article:  [Generic Drugmakers Embrace Inter Partes Review Process]Thanks to Congress’ administrative alternative to court litigation of patents, generic drug manufacturers have embraced… Read More

Is Medical Tourism Safe?

by The Doctors, featuring I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

The Doctors welcomed Medical Tourism Association President Renee-Marie Stephano and Harvard professor and author of “Patients with Passports” Glenn Cohen to discuss just how safe… Read More

Limiting State Flexibility in Drug Pricing

NEJM, September 13, 2018
by Nicholas Bagley and Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article:  Throughout the United States, escalating drug prices are putting immense pressure on state budgets. Several states are looking for ways to push back. Last year, Massachusetts asked… Read More

Are Fraud and Abuse Laws Stifling Value-Based Care?

NEJM Catalyst , September 12, 2018
by Carmel Shachar (Executive Director)

From the article:  While health care delivery and financing should not be a free-for-all, designing the exemptions to explicitly conform to specific regulatory programs does not best serve the system.… Read More

Petrie-Flom is Hiring! Call for Applications

Petrie-Flom Center, September 2018

General informationThe Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School is seeking student interns for the Fall 2018. Availability to start immediately… Read More

Who’s to blame when a machine botches your surgery?

Quartz, September 10, 2018
by Robert David Hart (quoting W. Nicholson Price II, Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the article:  Determining the levels of legal responsibility for AIs as a whole is a fairly new area and one that has yet to be seriously tested in court. What’s more, in a health care… Read More

Call for Applications: Petrie-Flom Center Student Internship Program
Petrie-Flom Center, Harvard Law School

Deadline: September 24, 2018

General informationThe Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School is seeking student interns for the Fall 2018 semester. Availability to start immediately… Read More

Petrie-Flom Welcomes 2018-2019 Student Fellows

Petrie-Flom Center, September 10, 2018

We are so excited to welcome a new crop of Student Fellows to the Petrie-Flom Center family. These six students are a fantastic cohort of health law policy, biotechnology, and bioethics scholars who join… Read More

The Generic Drug Industry Embraces a Faster, Cheaper Pathway for Challenging Patents

Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, August 2018, Vol. 14, Issue 73
by Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus), Reed F. Beall, Aaron S. Kesselheim

From the abstract:  Background Most new brand-name drugs are protected by patents from generic competition, but these patents are occasionally granted in error. Invalidating such patents has traditionally… Read More

FDA confronts its limits in push on drug pricing

Biopharmadive, August 27, 2018
by Ned Pagliarulo, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article:  Drugmakers like AbbVie, which makes the best-selling biologic Humira (adalimumab), have reached settlement deals with makers of approved biosimilars to push off market… Read More

Drug Prices in Ads: Senate Passes Amendment

RAPS Regulatory Focus, August 24, 2018
by Zachary Brennan, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article:  Earlier this month, CMS also announced plans to begin using what’s called step therapy to try to lower the spend on Part B drugs by about 20% in Medicare Advantage… Read More

HHS offers scant evidence Trump’s drug blueprint putting brakes on price hikes

S&P Global Market Intelligence, August 22, 2018
by Donna Young, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article:  Health and Human Services provided scant evidence, filled with caveats, to back up its chief's claim that drugmakers were responding to the Trump administration's plan… Read More

How Regulation Can Improve Surgery

The Regulatory Review, August 22, 2018
by Benjamin Barsky, quoting Jonathan Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the article:  Thousands of American lives are in surgeons’ hands every day. But, according to a recent article by a Harvard professor, these patients have good… Read More

Professor/Associate Professor
Boston University School of Law

Deadline: Open until filled

From the description:  Boston University School of Law is seeking both entry-level and lateral faculty for positions with a projected start date of July 1, 2019. The search is broad and not limited… Read More

Student Fellow Alumnus Zach Shapiro Named Solomon Center Research Fellow

Solomon Center for Health and Policy at Yale Law School , August 20, 2018

The Solomon Center for Health Law and Policy at Yale Law School announced new fellows and staff for the 2018-2019 academic year, including the appointment of Student Fellow Alumnus Zach Shapiro as… Read More

Petrie-Flom Welcomes New Precision Medicine Fellow!

Petrie-Flom Center, August 16, 2018

We are excited to announce that Sara Gerke is joining the Petrie-Flom Center's Project on Precision Medicine, Artificial Intelligence, and Law (PMAIL) as our Precision Medicine Fellow. As the Fellow,… Read More

Revisiting the Limits of Professional Autonomy

Harvard Journal of Law and Gender, Vol. 41, No. 1
by Maayan Sudai (Student Fellow Alumna)

From the paper: Social movements that seek to change biomedical policy face the particularly challenging task of effectively contesting the scientific and normative basis used to justify medical professional… Read More

We Have to Be Smart About Artificial Intelligence in Medicine

Slate, August 15, 2018
by W. Nicholson Price II (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: For millions of people suffering from diabetes, new technology enabled by artificial intelligence promises to make management much easier. Medtronic’s Guardian Connect system promises… Read More

Drug Pricing Policy

Health Affairs Blog, August 14, 2018
by Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the post:  Last Tuesday, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) took its latest action in the area of drug pricing. CMS gave Medicare Advantage (MA) plans the ability… Read More

Viewpoint: Promoting Patient Interests in Implementing the Federal Right to Try Act

JAMA, August 13, 2018
by Holly Fernandez Lynch (former Executive Director and Academic Fellow Alumna), Patricia J. Zettler, Ameet Sarpatwari

Former Executive Director and Academic Fellow Alumna Holly Fernandez Lynch has co-authored an opinion piece on the federal Right to Try Act of 2017. From the article: On May 30, 2018, President Trump signed… Read More

The Trump admin has another pretty good, pretty modest plan to lower drug costs

Vox, August 13, 2018
by Dylan Scott, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: “My concern is that once again, the administration’s rhetoric is out of step with its actual policy moves,” Sachs said. “The administration is promoting this move… Read More

Katie Kraschel Named One of ABA’s Top 40 Young Lawyers

Solomon Center for Health Law and Policy at Yale Law School, August 9, 2018
by Honoring Katie Kraschel (Student Fellow Alumna)

Katie Kraschel, Executive Director of the Solomon Center for Health Law and Policy,  has been named among the American Bar Association’s “Top 40 Young Lawyers” for 2018. The… Read More

Perspective: Will Courts Allow States to Regulate Drug Prices?

NEJM, August 8, 2018
by Christopher Robertson (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: Pharmaceuticals are consuming increasingly large portions of U.S. state budgets, and high prices are preventing patients from getting, and adhering to, essential medicines. In mid-May… Read More

CMS’ plan to lower drug spending in Medicare Advantage

Politico Pulse, August 8, 2018
by Brianna Ehley, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Some viewed the step as a bit of a letdown, since HHS Secretary Alex Azar has been touting more sweeping changes to drug prices in Medicare Part B, like letting the private sector insurance… Read More

Here’s what’s behind the ads accusing Bob Hugin of ‘killing off cancer patients’

northjersey.com, August 7, 2018
by Herb Jackson, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: "They're resorting to tactics the FDA criticized. Under the guise of patient safety, this is really about preserving a monopoly position," said law professor Rachel Sachs, who teaches at… Read More

To Tame Prescription Prices, HHS Dips A Toe Into Drug Importation Stream

Kaiser Health News, August 1, 2018
by Rachel Bluth, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: This isn’t the first time officials have suggested importing drugs from other countries to find better prices. Bills have been offered in Congress to allow it, and George… Read More

Administering Health Innovation

Cardozo Law Review, Volume 39, Issue 6 (July 2018)
by Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Scholars and policymakers have recently begun to focus on the role federal agencies charged with health-related missions can play in the development of innovative health technologies… Read More

Delinking Reimbursement

Minnesota Law Review, Vol. 102, Issue 6 (July 2018)
by Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

Introduction: Recently, scholars and policymakers on both sides of the aisle have become interested in the legal and regulatory structures surrounding pharmaceutical approval and reimbursement in this… Read More

Drug Approval in a Learning Health System

Minnesota Law Review, 2018
by W. Nicholson Price

From the abstract: The current system of FDA approval seems to make few happy. Some argue FDA approves drugs too slowly; others too quickly. Many agree that FDA — and the health system generally… Read More

A Fear of Lawsuits Really Does Seem to Result in Extra Medical Tests

The New York Times, July 23, 2018
by Margot Sanger-Katz, featuring Michael Frakes (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the article:  Mr. Gruber and Michael D. Frakes, a Duke economist and lawyer, looked at the health care system for active-duty members of the military. Under longstanding law, such patients get… Read More

Defensive Medicine

National Bureau of Economic Research Working Paper Series , July 2018
by Michael D. Frakes (Former Academic Fellow) and Jonathan Gruber

From the abstract:  We estimate the extent of defensive medicine by physicians, embracing the no-liability counterfactual made possible by the structure of liability rules in the Military Heath System.… Read More

Medical Liability and Treatment Relationships

Wolters Kluwer, Fourth edition, 2018
by Mark A. Hall, David Orentlicher, Mary Anne Bobinski, Nicholas Bagley, I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the description:  Medical Liability and Treatment Relationships is based on Part I, “The Provider and the Patient,” of parent book Health Care Law and Ethics, and adds… Read More

Bioethics and Public Health Law

Wolters Kluwer, Fourth edition, 2018
by Mary Anne Bobinski, David Orentlicher, I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director), Mark A. Hall

From the description:  Financial and ethical issues are integrated into this concise and engaging treatment of Bioethics and Public Health Law. The complex relationship between patients,… Read More

Personhood Seeking New Life with Republican Control

Indiana Law Journal, April 2017
by Jonathan F. Will, I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director) and Eli Y. Adashi

From the abstract:  Just three days prior to the inauguration of Donald J. Trump as president of the United States, Rep. Jody B. Hice (R-GA) introduced the Sanctity of Human Life Act (H.R. 586), which,… Read More

The Health 202: This mother’s tweet about drug prices went viral. Trump’s plans are unlikely to help

Washington Post, July 24, 2018
by by Colby Itkowitz, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: “It’s going to take a lot of time and there's a lot of hurdles in the way, but that’s not what you want to explain when you want to show how you’re lowering… Read More

Unpacking the bold — and the bluster — in Trump’s plan to bring down drug prices

STAT, July 23, 2018
by by Erin Mershon, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: The administration says the proposal will save Medicare money, which could translate into lower premiums. It will also mean lower co-pays for any beneficiary who might need a new drug… Read More

The Trump administration finally has one good idea to lower drug prices

Vox, July 20, 2018
by by Dylan Scott, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Right now, in the above circumstances and when there isn’t an actual drug shortage, “we don’t have a good policy solution,” Scott Gottlieb, the FDA commissioner,… Read More

Update: UK Ministers Quit Over Brexit

BBC, July 9, 2018
by Interview featuring Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the interview: We consider the implications for Brexit as two senior UK ministers resign. David Henig is UK director of the European Centre For International Political Economy. He explains why this… Read More

HHS forced to choose migrants over medicines

Politico, July 18, 2018
by By Dan Diamond, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Echoing the pharma industry, Verma stressed that the state's request violated current law — the first time she's publicly cited a legal defense. “f you want to go… Read More

What Pfizer, Trump, and consumers got out of a surprising deal — and what they didn’t

STAT, July 11, 2018
by By Erin Mershon and Ike Swetlitz, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: After months of pledging he would get pharmaceutical companies to lower their prices, President Trump can now say that he pressed the CEO of a major drug maker, Pfizer, to back… Read More

The Health 202: ‘ACA’ removed from swaths of Medicaid.gov website, watchdog reports

Washington Post, July 12, 2018
by By Colby Itkowitz, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: As The Post’s Damian Paletta also noted, the announcement was an example of Trump’s successful use of the presidential bully pulpit. “This is not an industry… Read More

The News on Drug Prices? Nothing Good

The New York Times, July 17, 2018
by By The Editorial Board, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: “It takes away a substantial tool that a lot of states were hoping to use,” says Rachel Sachs, a law professor and drug policy expert at Washington University in St. Louis.… Read More

Pro-ACA group: Court pick Kavanaugh refused to uphold pre-existing condition ban

PolitiFact, July 18, 2018
by By Jon Greenberg, quoting Allison K. Hoffman (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: For the makers of the ad, this is very simple. "Two judges upheld the Affordable Care Act and its patient protections, and he declined to uphold it," Demand Justice executive director… Read More

Donald Trump’s phony war on high prescription drug prices, explained

Vox, July 13, 2018
by By Dylan Scott, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Pfizer ended up agreeing to postpone its price hikes for now. The president was happy to take credit for that news, even if all he had really won was a temporary delay. Certainly not… Read More

Fox News pundit says Brett Kavanaugh is pro-Obamacare. Is he?

PolitiFact, July 11, 2018
by By Jon Greenberg, quoting Allison K. Hoffman (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: In the 2011 case, Blumstein said Kavanaugh showed "a traditional norm of judicial restraint." Mark Hall at Wake Forest University echoed that point. He sees Kavanaugh’s opinions… Read More

As Arkansas ushers in new Trump-era Medicaid rules, thousands fear losing benefits

Reuters, July 10, 2018
by By Yasmeen Abutaleb, quoting Allison K. Hoffman (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Days after the ruling, Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin cut dental and vision benefits for some 460,000 state Medicaid recipients, saying the benefits were dependent on implementation of… Read More

Abortion row reignites as US Supreme Court justice retires

The Citizen, June 29, 2018
by By AFP, quoting Allison K. Hoffman (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Allison Hoffman, a law professor at the University of Pennsylvania, says many Supreme Court decisions that fell short of a full repeal of Row vs Wade have nevertheless eroded women’s… Read More

Understanding the Development Challenges Associated with Emerging Non-Traditional Antibiotics

Duke-Margolis Center for Heath Policy, June 14, 2018
by Webcast featuring Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the webcast: Convened by the Duke-Robert J. Margolis, MD, Center for Health Policy at Duke University and supported by a cooperative agreement with FDA, this public event will focus on the range of… Read More

“What Is PER?” Patient Engagement in Research as a Hit

Canadian Journal of Bioethics / Revue canadienne de bioéthique, July 6, 2018, Vol 1, Issue 2
by By Jean-Christophe Bélisle-Pipon (Visiting Researcher), Claudio Del Grande, and Geneviève Rouleau

From the paper: Engaging patients in research conduct and agenda setting is increasingly considered as an ethical imperative, and a way to transcend views of patients as passive subjects by fostering their… Read More

CMS quit test of pricey cancer treatment amid concerns over industry role

Politico, July 9, 2018
by By Sarah Karlin-Smith and David Pittman, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: “Coming from an administration which has a stated goal of trying to reduce drug pricing, trying to reduce overall drug spending and health care spending … at every turn this… Read More

Viagra goes up AGAIN

Daily Mail, July 2, 2018
by By Mia De Graaf, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Economists are now calling on the Department of Health and Human Services to clarify what kind of measures they were planning on levying against companies that did not stick to the plan. … Read More

Regulation of Stem Cell Therapy Travel

Current Stem Cell Reports, July 2018
by I. Glenn Cohen and Shelly Simana

From the abstract: Purpose of Review Stem cell therapies (hereinafter: SCT) hold tremendous promise for the treatment of a variety of diseases. Yet, alongside the medical potential, they pose significant… Read More

Tempering Expectations of Breakthrough Therapy Designated Drugs

Journal of Clinical Pathways, June 10, 2018
by Interviewing Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the interview: A recent study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology (online June 20, 2018; doi:10.1200/JCO/2017.77.1592) sought to evaluate the United States Food and Drug Administration… Read More

Legislative Attorney (Health Law)
Congressional Research Service (CRS), American Law Division (ALD)

Deadline: Open until filled.

General DescriptionThe Congressional Research Service (CRS), American Law Division (ALD), seeks a Legislative Attorney to analyze legal questions that emerge from the work of Congress related to health… Read More

Medical Legal Partnership Research Associate
Solomon Center for Health Law and Policy at Yale Law School

Deadline: Open until filled.

General DescriptionThe Solomon Center for Health Law and Policy at Yale Law School seeks applications for a quantitative research associate to contribute to a critical gap in the legal and biomedical scholarly… Read More

Call for Proposals Enforcement, Litigation, and Compliance Conference
Food and Drug Law Institute

Deadline: August 09, 2018

The annual Enforcement, Litigation, and Compliance Conference brings together industry, regulators, attorneys, litigators, academics, and consultants to discuss trends and issues in enforcement and compliance,… Read More

IRB Oversight of Patient-Centered Outcomes Research: A National Survey of IRB Chairpersons

Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics, June 14, 2018
by Joel S. Weissman, Eric G. Campbell, I. Glenn Cohen, Holly Fernandez Lynch, Emily A. Largent, Avni Gupta, Ronen Rozenblum, Melissa Abraham, Karen Spike

From the abstract:  Patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR) is becoming increasingly common. However, there is little evidence regarding what novel ethical challenges, if any, are posed by PCOR… Read More

Building Capacity for a Global Genome Editing Observatory: Institutional Design

Trends in Biotechnology, June, 2018
by Krishanu Saha, J. Benjamin Hurlbut,Sheila Jasanoff,Aziza Ahmed, Anthony Appiah, Elizabeth Bartholet [...] I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)[...]

Complete author list: Krishanu Saha, J. Benjamin Hurlbut, Sheila Jasanoff, Aziza Ahmed, Anthony Appiah, Elizabeth Bartholet,  Françoise Baylis, Gaymon Bennett, George Church, I. Glenn Cohen, George… Read More

On the Human Right to Health

Human Rights, Democracy, and Legitimacy in a World of Disorder , 2018
by I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

Faculty Director I. Glenn Cohen has written a chapter in the fortchoming book "Human Rights, Democracy, and Legitimacy in a World of Disorder," (Cambridge University Press, edited by Silja… Read More

Precision Medicines Approved More Quickly, With Less Data

MedPage Today, May 25, 2018
by Shannon Firth, quoting Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: Pivotal trials for precision medicines were scarcer, less likely to be controlled or blinded, and had fewer participants than those for other agents, the study found.  The less rigorous… Read More

JAMA Forum: The Risks and Benefits of Expedited Drug Reviews

JAMA Forum, May 23, 2018
by Austin Frakt, citing paper co-authored by Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) oversees several programs that expedite approval of certain drugs that treat serious conditions and address unmet medical needs. On average,… Read More

Health Insurance’s Secondary Cost Problem

Harvard Law & Policy Review, Forthcoming
by Matthew J.B. Lawrence (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the abstract: This Article identifies a fundamental problem with health insurance and, so, contemporary American health care. While competition pushes health insurers to minimize the primary costs… Read More

Trump unveils plan to cut drug prices

The Lancet, June 2, 2018, vol. 391, no. 10136
by Susan Jaffe, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: A trade association that represents PBMs disagrees. Eliminating rebates would leave patients and insurers “at the mercy of drug manufacturer pricing strategies”, according… Read More

Is Trump giving the EU higher drug prices too?

DW, June 1, 2018
by Lindsey Rae Gjording, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Through single-payer health care systems the EU is able to regulate consumer costs at reasonable levels. It also makes decisions about what new drugs are worth spending taxpayer money… Read More

Trump Wants Medicaid to Push for Lower Drug Prices – But Will Patients Be Hurt?

PEW, May 30, 2018
by Michael Ollove, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: While 74 percent of closed formularies result in lower prices, 21 percent result in price increases, a 2016 report in the American Journal of Managed Care found. And 29… Read More

Vermont legislators pass a drug importation law. So what?

Salon, May 27, 2018
by Shefali Luthra, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Importation backers — including the National Academy for State Health Policy (NASHP), which helped craft Vermont’s bill and has worked with state lawmakers — hope he’ll… Read More

Criticism of ‘right to try’ law for experimental drugs after it passes in US

Chemistry World, June 5, 2018
by Anthony King, quoting Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the article:  The US government has controversially announced that it will allow unapproved, experimental drugs to be given to terminally ill patients. The ‘right to try’ law passed… Read More

Pro-life groups cheer Supreme Court’s refusal to hear medication-induced abortion ban in Arkansas

The Washington Times, May 29, 2018
by Alex Swoyer, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article: Planned Parenthood of Arkansas and Eastern Oklahoma sued, arguing the law would halt operations at two of the state’s remaining three abortion clinics. The organization said that… Read More

Facebook’s Health Groups Offer A Lifeline, But Privacy Concerns Linger

Huffington Post, May 28, 2018
by Sarah Elizabeth Richards, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article: It’s impossible to expect a true sense of privacy among 55,000 people, but users and bioethicists alike have lingering questions about Facebook’s use of data. “How much… Read More

HIPAA and Protecting Health Information in the 21st Century

JAMA, May 24, 2018
by I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director) and Michelle M. Mello

Faculty Director I. Glenn Cohen has co-authored a new opinion piece in JAMA that addresses the adequacy of HIPAA in protecting electronic health data in light of the launch of the Trump administration's… Read More

Call for Proposals
Policies for Action: Policy and Law Research to Build a Culture of Health

Deadline: June 07, 2018 3:00 PM

General DescriptionApproximately $2.0 million will be awarded through P4A's 2018 CFP, which includes approximately $1,550,000 total for the general CFP, and $450,000 set aside for pre-emption-focused… Read More

Center for Public Health Law Research Fellow
Center for Public Health Law Research, Temple University

Deadline: Open until filled.

General DescriptionThe Center for Public Health Law Research (CPHLR) supports the widespread adoption of scientific tools and methods for mapping and evaluating the impact of law on health. The Center… Read More

Do NFL Safety Concerns Mean Regulators Should Get in the Game?

Bloomberg Environment, April 26, 2018
by Fatima Hussein, featuring report by the Law and Ethics Initiative of the Football Players Health Study at Harvard University

From the article: Concussions involving NFL players have been an increasing worry. Now a debate has resurfaced about whether federal safety regulators should be able to fine teams found guilty of inflicting… Read More

The Ethics of Medicaid’s Work Requirements and Other Personal Responsibility Policies

JAMA, May 7, 2018
by Harald Schmidt and Allison K. Hoffman (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the paper:  Breaking controversial new ground, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) recently invited states to consider establishing work requirements as a condition of receiving… Read More

Grants

Berkeley Technology Law Journal, May 10, 2018
by W. Nicholson Price II (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the paper: Innovation is a primary source of economic growth, and is accordingly the target of substantial academic and government attention. Grants are a key tool in the government’s arsenal… Read More

Drug made famous by Shkreli’s 5,000% price hike is still $750 a pill

Ars Technica, May 4, 2018
by Beth Mole, quoting W. Nicholson Price II (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: Disgraced ex-pharmaceutical executive and hedge fund manager Martin Shkreli is now behind bars, facing a seven-year prison sentence for securities fraud. Yet the drug-price hike… Read More