Drug That Could Provide Near Immediate Relief For Postpartum Depression Gets OK From FDA

Kaiser Health News, March 20, 2019

KHN Morning Briefing: Summaries of health policy coverage from major news organizations But the infusion will be expensive, averaging $34,000 per patient before discounts, and the women would have to stay… Read More

Health Plans For State Employees Use Medicare’s Hammer On Hospital Bills

NPR, March 20, 2019
by Julie Appleby

States. They're just as perplexed as the rest of us over the ever-rising cost of health care premiums. Now some states –including Montana, North Carolina and Oregon — are moving… Read More

In Efforts To Halt Teen Vaping…

Kaiser Health News, March 20, 2019

KHN Morning Briefing: Summaries of health policy coverage from major news organizations Even after Altria and Juul said they'll take extra efforts to prevent teens from getting addicted, outgoing… Read More

God, country, and chickenpox

Washington Post, March 19, 2019
by Katie Mettler

Bill Kunkel used to vaccinate his children, before he read where some vaccines come from. He is skeptical of the pharmaceutical industry’s motives and came across anti-vaxxer theories online, though… Read More

Ending HIV In Mississippi Means Cutting Through Racism, Poverty And Homophobia

NPR, March 16, 2019
by Ari Shapiro and Dave Blanchard

Ending HIV transmission in America within the next decade — a stated goal of the Trump Administration — isn't a question of coming up with new medication. The medicines to prevent… Read More

Methadone Helped Her Quit Heroin. Now She’s Suing U.S. Prisons to Allow the Treatment.

New York Times, March 15, 2019
by Abby Goodnough

A Massachusetts woman recovering from heroin addiction sued the Federal Bureau of Prisons on Friday over its policy prohibiting methadone treatment, which she wants to continue when she starts a yearlong… Read More

The Challenges of Innovating Access to Abortion

New Yorker, March 6, 2019
by Sue Halpern

[...] Telemedicine—obtaining medical services over the phone or through the Internet—is not a new phenomenon. In the U.S., it began to take off in the late nineteen-fifties, and a 2016… Read More

Planned Parenthood, American Medical Association sue Trump administration over abortion ‘gag rule’

Washington Post, March 5, 2019
by Ariana Eunjung Cha

The Planned Parenthood Federation of America and the American Medical Association have filed a lawsuit to block a new federal rule that would prohibit clinics participating in a program for low-income… Read More

Mental Health Treatment Denied to Customers by Giant Insurer’s Policies, Judge Rules

New York Times, March 5, 2019
by Reed Abelson

In a scathing decision released Tuesday, a federal judge in Northern California ruled that a unit of UnitedHealth Group, the giant health insurer, had created internal policies aimed at effectively discriminating… Read More

Reducing Maternal Mortality

New York Times, March 5, 2019
by Emily Kumler Kaplan

Women in the United States face a far greater risk of dying from childbirth complications than in many other wealthy countries. Now the federal government has taken a step toward addressing the… Read More

Big Doctor Group Supports Medicare And Medicaid ‘Buy Ins’

Forbes, February 28, 2019
by Bruce Japsen

The nation’s largest primary care doctor group supports Medicare and Medicaid expansions that include a ‘buy in’ for those looking to gain health coverage under the age of 65. The American… Read More

​Background Check Bill Passes House, But Dems Are Still Moving Cautiously When Picking Their Gun Saf

Kaiser Health News, February 28, 2019

KHN Morning Briefing: Summaries of health policy coverage from major news organizations The House passed legislation on Wednesday that would expand background checks to all gun sales, a bill that's… Read More

“Mom, When They Look at Me, They See Dollar Signs”

Mother Jones, March/April 2019 issue
by Julia Lurie

[...] The addiction community has a name for what happened to Brianne. It’s called the “Florida shuffle,” a cycle wherein recovering users are wooed aggressively by rehabs and freelance… Read More

There’s A New ‘Medicare-For-All’ Bill In The House

Kaiser Health News, February 27, 2019
by Shefali Luthra

Members of the House on Wednesday offered their version of a “Medicare-for-all” bill that is broader than what’s been put forth by Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), whose 2016 presidential… Read More

‘Miraculous’ stem cell therapy has sickened people in five states

Washington Post, February 27, 2019
by William Wan and Laurie McGinley

[...] Over the past year, at least 17 people have been hospitalized after being injected with products made from umbilical cord blood, a little-known but fast-growing segment of the booming stem cell… Read More

With one manufacturer and little money to be made, supplies of a critical cancer drug are dwindling

STAT, February 20, 2019
by Meghana Keshavan

[...] There’s a critical national shortage of BCG, a biologic drug that has been used for decades and that is a remarkably effective medicine. Many smaller clinics have already run out of the lifesaving… Read More

FDA: Young-blood transfusions provide ‘no proven clinical benefit’ for aging, Alzheimer’s

STAT, February 19, 2019
by Rebecca Robbins

he quest to rejuvenate aging people with the blood of young donors has generated paying customers, captured the popular imagination, and, now, prompted a warning from the Food and Drug Administration.… Read More

Do You Want to Be Pregnant? It’s Not Always a Yes-or-No Answer

New York Times, February 15, 2019
by Margot Sanger-Katz and Claire Cain Miller

For decades, researchers and physicians tended to think about pregnancies as either planned or unplanned. But new data reveals that for a significant group of women, their feelings don’t neatly fit… Read More

Court allows House Democrats to join Obamacare’s defense

Politico, February 14, 2019
by Alice Miranda Ollstein

A federal appeals court is allowing House Democrats to defend Obamacare in a lawsuit threatening the future of the health care law. The 5th Circuit Court of Appeals today granted the House’s petition… Read More

Doctors Should Identify Patients Who Are At Risk For Depression During Or After Pregnancy…

Kaiser Health News, February 13, 2019

KHN Morning Briefing: Summaries of health policy coverage from major news organizations The new guidelines comes from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, a group whose guidance most insurance… Read More

‘Church Of Safe Injection’ Offers Needles, Naloxone To Prevent Opioid Overdoses

WBUR (NPR Boston), February 12, 2019
by Deborah Becker

On a bitter cold afternoon in front of the central bus stop in Bangor, Maine, about a half-dozen people recently surrounded a folding table covered with handmade signs offering free clean syringes, coffee… Read More

Blue Cross Plans Launch Food Delivery To Address Social Determinants

Forbes, February 12, 2019
by Bruce Japsen

One of the nation’s largest Blue Cross Blue Shield companies is expanding food delivery to 40 zip codes considered "food deserts" in Chicago and Dallas through a new service as health insurers… Read More

American Travelers Seek Cheaper Prescription Drugs In Mexico And Beyond

NPR, February 11, 2019
by Bram Sable-Smith

[...] The U.S. government estimates that close to 1 million people in California alone cross to Mexico annually for health care, including to buy prescription drugs. And between 150,000 and 320,000… Read More

Shrinking Medicaid Rolls In Missouri And Tennessee Raise Flag On Vetting Process

Kaiser Health News, February 8, 2019
by Phil Galewitz

[...] Ward and her children are among tens of thousands of Medicaid enrollees who were dropped by Missouri and Tennessee last year as both states stepped up efforts to verify members’ eligibility.… Read More

Measles Cases Mount In Pacific Northwest Outbreak

NPR, February 8, 2019
by Jonathan Lambert

A measles outbreak in Washington state prompted Gov. Jay Inslee to declare a state of emergency on Jan. 25. As of Thursday, 55 cases have been confirmed this year, most of them in unvaccinated children… Read More

U.S. Prosecutors Sue To Stop Nation’s First Supervised Injection Site For Opioids

NPR, February 6, 2019
by Bobby Allyn

After months of threats, federal prosecutors in Philadelphia launched a legal challenge on Wednesday against the nonprofit Safehouse, which is hoping to open what could be the nation's first site where… Read More

Trump Highlights Health Agenda With Vow To Lower ‘Unfair’ Drug Prices

Kaiser Health News, February 6, 2019
by Julie Rovner

It was not the centerpiece, but health was a persistent theme in President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address at the Capitol on Tuesday night. Although the administration has focused more… Read More

Power, Politics and Knowledge Claims: Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights in the SDG Era

Global Policy , January 28, 2019
by by Alicia Ely Yamin (Senior Fellow for GHRP)

From the article: "The selection of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) , targets and indicators for sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) can only be understood in the light of struggles to… Read More

Massachusetts Attorney General Implicates Family Behind Purdue Pharma In Opioid Deaths

WBUR, January 16, 2019
by Christine Willmsen and Martha Bebinger

The Sackler family behind Purdue Pharma knew that its painkiller OxyContin was causing overdoses, yet continued to cash in as deaths mounted, the Massachusetts attorney general alleges in court documents… Read More

Tribes face food and medicine crisis as shutdown continues, lawmakers are told

Washington Post, January 15, 2019
by Darryl Fears

As the partial government shutdown drags on, Native American tribes in urban and rural areas are facing food shortages and a health care crisis because federal funds that stock pantries and provide medicine… Read More

Trump birth control coverage rules blocked nationwide

AP, January 14, 2019
by Marc Levy

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — A federal judge on Monday put a nationwide hold on Trump administration rules that allow more employers to opt out of providing women with no-cost birth control. U.S. District… Read More

How Chummy Are Junk Food Giants and China’s Health Officials?

New York Times, January 9, 2019
by Andrew Jacobs

Happy 10 Minutes, a Chinese government campaign that encouraged schoolchildren to exercise for 10 minutes a day, would seem a laudable step toward improving public health in a nation struggling with alarming… Read More

FDA employees think shutdown could be deadly

CNN, January 8, 2019
by Vanessa Yurkevich and Jen Christensen

With about 41% of the US Food and Drug Administration off the job due to the government shutdown, some agency employees worry about the safety and health of the American public. Agency operations "continue… Read More

Health Care Industry Spends $30B A Year Pushing Its Wares, From Drugs To Stem Cell Treatment

Kaiser Health News, January 8, 2019
by Liz Szabo

Hoping to earn its share of the $3.5 trillion health care market, the medical industry is pouring more money than ever into advertising its products — from high-priced prescriptions to… Read More

‘Left behind’

STAT, January 8, 2019
by Apoorva Mandavili, with photos by Michael Starghill Jr.

[...] Vergel, 59, attributes most of these conditions to his low CD4 count, a key marker of immune function in HIV-positive people. He is what’s known as an immunologic non-responder (INR) —… Read More

The Psychiatrist Can See Your Child Now, Virtually

Wall Street Journal, January 8, 2019
by Laura Landro

This article is behind a paywall. Harvard affiliates can access the full text via Hollis. [...] With a rising number of teens and adolescents suffering from depression and anxiety, and too few professionals… Read More

Prescription Drug Costs Driven By Manufacturer Price Hikes, Not Innovation

NPR, January 7, 2019
by Alison Kodjak

The skyrocketing cost of many prescription drugs in the U.S. can be blamed primarily on price increases, not expensive new therapies or improvements in existing medications as drug companies frequently… Read More

All seven of the FDA’s recent commissioners agree it should be independent

STAT, January 7, 2019
by Ike Swetlitz

WASHINGTON — Nearly every person who’s run the Food and Drug Administration in recent history agrees the agency should break free from its political supervisors — a rare consensus from… Read More

FDA Accuses Juul and Altria of Backing Off Plan to Stop Youth Vaping

New York Times, January 4, 2019
by Sheila Kaplan

WASHINGTON — The Food and Drug Administration is accusing Juul and Altria of reneging on promises they made to the government to keep e-cigarettes away from minors. Dr. Scott Gottlieb, the agency’s… Read More

Health as a Human Right, Medicare for All, and the Evolution of the American Health Care Debate

Take Care Blog, December 11, 2018
by By Carmel Shachar (Executive Director), Alex Pearlman (Communications Manager) and I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article: The United States famously does not have an explicit federal constitutional right to health. By contract, the “enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health”… Read More

Access to Personal Information for Public Health Research: Transparency Should Always Be Mandatory

Canadian Journal of Bioethics, December 7, 2018
by by Jean-Christophe Bélisle-Pipon (Visiting Researcher)

From the article: "In Québec, the Act Respecting Access to Documents Held by Public Bodies and the Protection of Personal Information provides an exception to transparency to most public… Read More

AVAILABLE FOR PRE-ORDER! Transparency in Health and Health Care in the United States

Cambridge University Press, Forthcoming June 2019
by Holly Fernandez Lynch, I. Glenn Cohen, Carmel Shachar, and Barbara J. Evans (eds.)

This edited volume stems from the Petrie-Flom Center’s 2017 annual conference, which brought together leading experts to reach better understandings of this health policy buzzword, recognizing… Read More

Conflicts of interest and the (in)dependence of experts advising government on immunization policies

Vaccine, October 22, 2018
by Jean-Christophe Bélisle-Pipon (Visiting Scholar), Louise Ringuette, Anne-Isabelle Cloutier, Victoria Doudenkova, and Bryn Williams-Jones

From the article: There has been increasing attention to financial conflicts of interest (COI) in public health research and policy making, with concerns that some decisions are not in the public interest.… Read More

Outbreak Week: How prepared are we for the next health crisis?

Harvard Law Today, October 5, 2018

From the article:  Outbreak Week, led by the Harvard Global Health Institute, was a unique multidisciplinary effort investigating and engaging with epidemic and pandemic preparedness in the 21st century.… Read More

Smart pills can transmit data to your doctors, but what about privacy?

New Scientist, September 19, 2018
by I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director) and Alex Pearlman (Communications Manager)

From the article:  Abilify MyCite, a pill-app combination that can be used to track the ingestion of drugs for bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, was the first such product approved by the US Food… Read More

A Setback For Massachusetts In States’ Drive To Contain Medicaid Drug Spending

NPR Shots/WBUR, September 12, 2018
by Martha Bebinger, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article:  States serve as "laboratories of democracy," as U.S. Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis famously said. And states are also labs for health policy, launching all kinds of experiments… Read More

Are Fraud and Abuse Laws Stifling Value-Based Care?

NEJM Catalyst , September 12, 2018
by Carmel Shachar (Executive Director)

From the article:  While health care delivery and financing should not be a free-for-all, designing the exemptions to explicitly conform to specific regulatory programs does not best serve the system.… Read More

Petrie-Flom Welcomes 2018-2019 Student Fellows

Petrie-Flom Center, September 10, 2018

We are so excited to welcome a new crop of Student Fellows to the Petrie-Flom Center family. These six students are a fantastic cohort of health law policy, biotechnology, and bioethics scholars who join… Read More

Viewpoint: Promoting Patient Interests in Implementing the Federal Right to Try Act

JAMA, August 13, 2018
by Holly Fernandez Lynch (former Executive Director and Academic Fellow Alumna), Patricia J. Zettler, Ameet Sarpatwari

Former Executive Director and Academic Fellow Alumna Holly Fernandez Lynch has co-authored an opinion piece on the federal Right to Try Act of 2017. From the article: On May 30, 2018, President Trump signed… Read More

Legal Research Associate at the Center for Public Health Law Research
Temple University

Deadline: August 31, 2018

Description The Policy Surveillance Program (Program) is a national initiative funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to increase the use of effective regulatory, legal, and policy solutions to improve… Read More

The Health 202: This mother’s tweet about drug prices went viral. Trump’s plans are unlikely to help

Washington Post, July 24, 2018
by by Colby Itkowitz, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: “It’s going to take a lot of time and there's a lot of hurdles in the way, but that’s not what you want to explain when you want to show how you’re lowering… Read More

Climate Change and Health Online Certificate Program
Yale School of Public Health

Deadline: August 01, 2018

General DescriptionThe Yale School of Public Health's Climate Change and Health Certificate will prepare public health professionals and those in related fields to address the adverse health impacts… Read More

IRB Oversight of Patient-Centered Outcomes Research: A National Survey of IRB Chairpersons

Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics, June 14, 2018
by Joel S. Weissman, Eric G. Campbell, I. Glenn Cohen, Holly Fernandez Lynch, Emily A. Largent, Avni Gupta, Ronen Rozenblum, Melissa Abraham, Karen Spike

From the abstract:  Patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR) is becoming increasingly common. However, there is little evidence regarding what novel ethical challenges, if any, are posed by PCOR… Read More

On the Human Right to Health

Human Rights, Democracy, and Legitimacy in a World of Disorder , 2018
by I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

Faculty Director I. Glenn Cohen has written a chapter in the fortchoming book "Human Rights, Democracy, and Legitimacy in a World of Disorder," (Cambridge University Press, edited by Silja… Read More

Criticism of ‘right to try’ law for experimental drugs after it passes in US

Chemistry World, June 5, 2018
by Anthony King, quoting Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the article:  The US government has controversially announced that it will allow unapproved, experimental drugs to be given to terminally ill patients. The ‘right to try’ law passed… Read More

HIPAA and Protecting Health Information in the 21st Century

JAMA, May 24, 2018
by I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director) and Michelle M. Mello

Faculty Director I. Glenn Cohen has co-authored a new opinion piece in JAMA that addresses the adequacy of HIPAA in protecting electronic health data in light of the launch of the Trump administration's… Read More

What If The NFL Were Regulated By OSHA?

Deadspin, May 22, 2018
by Nicole Wetsman, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the Article: Last month, 253 men got new jobs. The process was highly publicized, and employers announced new hires to an audience of millions on live television. It’s likely that no one in… Read More

ALS patients losing time and hope as they wait for insurers to cover a pricey new drug

STAT, May 21, 2018
by Ed Silverman, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article: For the past two years, Sarah Benoit has been getting around with the help of a walker, waiting for a medicine that’s out of reach. Benoit, a former congressional aide, has ALS,… Read More

Center for Public Health Law Research Fellow
Center for Public Health Law Research, Temple University

Deadline: Open until filled.

General DescriptionThe Center for Public Health Law Research (CPHLR) supports the widespread adoption of scientific tools and methods for mapping and evaluating the impact of law on health. The Center… Read More

Circumvention Medical Tourism and Cutting Edge Medicine

Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies, May 12, 2018
by I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article: “Medical Tourism” is the travel of patients from a home country to a destination country for the primary purpose of receiving health care. “Circumvention Tourism”… Read More

Do NFL Safety Concerns Mean Regulators Should Get in the Game?

Bloomberg Environment, April 26, 2018
by Fatima Hussein, featuring report by the Law and Ethics Initiative of the Football Players Health Study at Harvard University

From the article: Concussions involving NFL players have been an increasing worry. Now a debate has resurfaced about whether federal safety regulators should be able to fine teams found guilty of inflicting… Read More

CRIT Litigation & Policy Associate
Collaboration for Research Integrity and Transparency, Yale Law School

Deadline: Open Until Filled

CRIT Litigation & Policy AssociateThe Collaboration for Research Integrity and Transparency (CRIT) is hiring a litigation and policy associate to start July 1, 2018. The associate will handle litigation… Read More

Chief Executive Officer, Changelab Solutions
Oakland, California

Deadline: Open Until Filled

General Description:ChangeLab Solutions, a leading national organization that helps to create healthier communities for all through innovative laws and policies, seeks a new Chief Executive Officer (CEO).… Read More

Planned Parenthood sues Trump administration over federal funding

The Washington Times, May 2, 2018
by Alex Swoyer, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article: Three Planned Parenthood affiliates sued Wednesday to demand taxpayer money keep flowing to the country’s largest abortion network, saying a new Trump administration policy… Read More

Valuations of Life: Birth defects, prenatal diagnoses, and disability
Uppsala University, Sweden

Deadline: June 01, 2018

General Description:Definitions of what counts as a valuable life implicitly and explicitly saturate both historical and contemporary narratives about birth defects, prenatal diagnoses, and disability.… Read More

Vaccine against Meningitis

La Presse, April 25, 2018
by Marie-Claude Malboeuf, Suit brought by Jean-Christophe Belisle Pipon (Visiting Researcher)

From the article: Quebec has agreed to pay twice as much as the United Kingdom for a new vaccine against meningitis, the effectiveness of which seemed uncertain. The disclosure of the price paid by Quebec… Read More

Addressing Financial Barriers to Enrollment in Clinical Trials

JAMA Oncology, April 19, 2018
by Emily A. Largent and Holly Fernandez Lynch (Former Executive Director)

From the article: Shortfalls in clinical trial recruitment and retention constitute a major obstacle to scientific advancement. One means of increasing patient participation rates is to reduce associated… Read More

Redesigning Provider Payments to Reduce Long-Term Costs by Promoting Healthy Development

National Academy of Medicine, April 20, 2018
by Nathaniel Z. Counts (Student Fellow alumnus), Neal Halfon, Kelly J. Kelleher, J. David Hawkins, Laurel K. Leslie, Thomas F. Boat, Mary Ann McCabe

From the article: Cognitive, aff ective, and behavioral health (CAB) conditions are among the costliest and fastest growing in the United States. An array of interventions is demonstrated to be eff ective… Read More

THE PRICE OF VACCINES MUST BE DISCLOSED, ORDERS A COURT

La Presse, April 19, 2018
by Marie-Claude Malboeuf, Suit brought by Jean-Christophe Belisle Pipon (Visiting Researcher)

From the article: Pharmaceutical companies doing business with the government will no longer be able to hide how much money they are getting to provide vaccines. This is what the Commission for Access… Read More

Utah’s quixotic Medicaid expansion plan, explained

Vox, April 2, 2018
by Dylan Scott, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Utah wants to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. Kind of. The state legislature has passed and Gov. Gary Herbert has signed a bill that would partially expand… Read More

Healthcare Accreditation Driving Patient Excellence in Europe

by Medical Tourism Magazine, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article: In the business of medical travel, quality drives the market and the quality of healthcare a hospital or healthcare organization provides is often validated by its accreditation status.… Read More

Mutual Obligations in Research and Withholding Payment From Deceptive Participants

The American Journal of Bioethics, 2018, Issue 4, Volume 18
by Holly Fernandez Lynch (Former Executive Director), Luke Gelinas (Senior Researcher), & Emily A. Largent

From the article: Paying research participants can be ethically charged, both when payment is offered and—as demonstrated in this case—when it is withheld. When individuals undergoing screening… Read More

Can Lost Embryos Give Rise to a Wrongful-Death Suit?

The Atlantic , April 5, 2018
by Sara Zhang, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article: Over a single weekend in March, an unprecedented disaster hit fertility clinics—twice. First came the news that the University Hospitals Fertility Center in Ohio, lost more… Read More

The Work of the Supreme Court

Hosted by the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School, April 11, 2018

PLEASE NOTE: A Harvard ID is required in order to attend this event.  Harvard affiliates: RSVP now! Read More

Researchers highlight the need to reconsider mitochondrial replacement moratorium

News Medical Life Sciences, March 28, 2018
by News Medical Life Sciences, citing I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article: Mothers with mitochondrial DNA mutations often give birth to children who face incurable and fatal illnesses. But a much-studied form of mitochondrial replacement (MR) could prevent the… Read More

Medical Tourism: Once Ready for Takeoff, Now Stuck at the Gate

Managed Care, March 28, 2018
by Richard Mark Kirkner, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article: Consultants predicted it would be a major business. Large employers and insurers were experimenting with it. But medical tourism has not lived up to the heady expectations. The ACA and… Read More

Program Director: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
Harvard University

Deadline: Open Until Filled

Duties & ResponsibilitiesThe Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health (SPH), a global leader in public health research and education, is looking for a Program Director for its Center for Health and… Read More

Prevalence of Publicly Available Expanded Access Policies

Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics, March 23, 2018
by Emily Jung (Petrie-Flom Student Intern), Patricia J. Zettler, Aaron S. Kesselheim

From the Article: The Food and Drug Administration's expanded access program allows patients with serious or immediately life‐threatening conditions to seek access to experimental drugs and treatments… Read More

Can Rationing through Inconvenience Be Ethical?

Hasting Center Report, Volume 48, Issue 1
by Nir Eyal, Paul L. Romain, and Christopher T. Robertson (Academic Fellow alumnus)

From the Article: In this article, we provide a comprehensive analysis and a normative assessment of rationing through inconvenience as a form of rationing. By “rationing through inconvenience”… Read More

General Attorney, Executive Office of the President
Office of Management and Budget, Washington DC

Deadline: March 23, 2018

General Description The general counsel's office is small, consisting of approximately 15 attorneys, who regularly meet with and advise policy officials in the White House, OMB itself, and other… Read More

Nicotine and Ethics: 2018 Brocher Summer Academy in Population-level Bioethics
Brocher Foundation, Hermance, Switzerland

Deadline: March 31, 2018

General Description:The Brocher Foundation invites junior faculty, post-docs, advanced graduate students, clinicians and other practitioners to apply for inclusion in the 2018 Brocher Summer Academy in… Read More

Risk and Resilience in Health Data Infrastructure

Colorado Technology Law Journal, Volume 16, Issue 1 (2017)
by W. Nicholson Price II (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

From the journal article: Today’s health system runs on data. However, for a system that generates and requires so much data, the health care system is surprisingly bad at maintaining, connecting,… Read More

Early-career researchers’ views on ethical dimensions of patient engagement in research

BMC Medical Ethics BMC series, 2018 19:21
by Jean-Christophe Bélisle-Pipon (Visiting Researcher) Geneviève Rouleau and Stanislav Birko

From the Article: Increasing attention and efforts are being put towards engaging patients in health research, and some have even argued that patient engagement in research (PER) is an ethical imperative.… Read More

Preventing Mitochondrial Disease

Obstetrics & Gynecology, March 2018 - Volume 131 - Issue 3
by Eli Y. Adashi and I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

Abstract: In a possible first, the heritable transmission of a fatal mitochondrial DNA disease (Leigh syndrome) may have been prevented by replacing the mutation-bearing mitochondria of oocytes with donated… Read More

Healthy People Health Policy Fellowship
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Deadline: February 24, 2018

DescriptionA fellowship is available in the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP) within the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health (OASH), Office of the Secretary (OS), at the… Read More

Harvard Clinical Bioethics Course
Center for Bioethics Harvard Medical School

Deadline: Open Registration

Course DescriptionThis intensive course is designed for members of ethics committees and others interested in ethical aspects of clinical practice. The target audience are physicians, ethics consultants,… Read More

CSPC 2018: Building Bridges Between Science, Policy, and Society
Canadian Science Policy Centre

Deadline: April 23, 2018

OverviewThe Canadian Science Policy Centre announces the call for panel proposals for the 10th Canadian Science Policy Conference (CSPC) to be held in Ottawa, Ontario, on November… Read More

Trump fires first salvo on drug prices

The Hill, February 12, 2018
by Peter Sullivan, referencing Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: President Trump is beginning to move on high drug prices, unveiling a series of modest proposals in his budget request released Monday. It’s the first time Trump has issued major… Read More

Trump teams rolls out new drug pricing ideas

Politico, February 12, 2018
by Sarah Karlin-Smith, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: TRUMP TEAM TAKES ANOTHER STAB AT DRUG PRICES: ARE THEY SERIOUS THIS TIME? — Late last week came two new signs the White House may finally be ready to move beyond rhetoric on… Read More

Reforming Biopharmaceutical Pricing at Home and Abroad

Executive Office of the President of the United States, February 2018
by The Council of Economic Advisers, citing work by Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: The affordability of healthcare and biopharmaceutical drugs is a top concern for Americans. It is often asserted that promoting innovation and affordable drugs are conflicting goals.… Read More

Budget, White Paper Provide Insight Into Trump Administration’s Strategy On Drug Pricing

Health Affairs, February 12, 2018
by Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: During his first year in office, President Donald Trump spoke often about the problem of high drug prices but took no action on the subject. President Trump’s new budget proposal and… Read More

Hundreds sign on to letter opposing ‘right to try’ drug bill

The Hill , February 5, 2018
by Rachel Roubein, reporting on Holly Fernandez Lynch (Former Executive Director and Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the Article:  Several hundred "right to try" critics sent a letter to House Energy and Commerce Committee leaders expressing their “strong opposition” to the bill President… Read More

Physicians, ethicists urge Congress not to pass ‘right-to-try’ legislation

Stat, February 1, 2018
by Ike Swetlitz, reporting on Holly Fernandez Lynch (Former Executive Director and Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Dozens of doctors, medical ethicists, and lawyers are warning Congress that legislation to allow Americans with life-threatening conditions access to unapproved, experimental drugs risks… Read More

Analyst in Health Policy
Congressional Research Service (CRS), Domestic Social Policy Division

Deadline: March 02, 2018

SummaryThe Congressional Research Service (CRS), Domestic Social Policy Division is seeking an Analyst in Health Policy to work on issues related to biomedical and health services policy. A general understanding… Read More

Public Health Analyst
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Deadline: February 24, 2018

General DescriptionThe CDC Foundation helps the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) save and improve lives by unleashing the power of collaboration between CDC, philanthropies, corporations,… Read More

Research and Communications Associate
Petrie-Flom Center, Harvard Law School

Deadline: This position has been filled.

Duties & ResponsibilitiesReporting to the Petrie-Flom Center’s Administrative Director and working closely with the Center’s Executive Director, Faculty Director, and other staff, the Research… Read More

Trump’s abandoned promise to bring down drug prices, explained

Vox, February 2, 2018
by Dylan Scott, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: One year into Donald Trump’s presidency, as he delivered his first State of the Union address, he has more or less abandoned his outspoken pledges to bring down the cost of America’s… Read More

The Regulatory Accountability Act of 2017 — Implications for FDA Regulation and Public Health

NEJM, February 1, 2018
by Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus), Erin C. Fuse Brown, and Aaron S. Kesselheim

From the article: In the past year, federal health policy has been characterized by pervasive uncertainty, but a consistent theme from the Trump administration and some prominent legislators has been opposition… Read More

Physicians, ethicists urge Congress not to pass ‘right to try’ legislation

STAT News, February 1, 2018
by Ike Swetlitz reporting on Holly Fernandez Lynch (Former Executive Director and Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: Dozens of doctors, medical ethicists, and lawyers are warning Congress that legislation to allow Americans with life-threatening conditions access to unapproved, experimental drugs risks… Read More

Trump Pledges To Lower Drug Costs — Can We Do It?

NPR, January 31, 2018
by Anthony Brooks, interviewing Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the podcast: President Trump says in his State of the Union that going after the high cost of prescription drugs is a top priority. Politicians have promised for years to bring them down. We’ll… Read More

It’s time to levy penalties for failing to report clinical trial results

STAT, January 17, 2018
by Holly Fernandez Lynch (Academic Fellow Alumna and former Executive Director)

From the article: I started my first job as an attorney in the fall of 2007, days after President George W. Bush signed the Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act (FDAAA) into law. As part… Read More

A New Approach to Treat Childhood Leukemia: Novartis’ CAR-T Therapy

The Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics, January 10, 2018
by Frazer A. Tessema and Jonathan J. Darrow (Student Fellow Alumnus)

From the article: On August 30, 2017, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced the approval of tisagenlecleucel (Kymriah; CTL019), Novartis' new treatment for B-cell acute lymphoblastic… Read More

Federal Right-to-Try Legislation — Threatening the FDA’s Public Health Mission

NEJM, January 10, 2018
by Steven Joffe and Holly Fernandez Lynch (Academic Fellow Alumna and former Executive Director)

From the article: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is the gatekeeper of the country’s drugs and medical devices. Originally created to prevent the misleading of patients, it was later tasked… Read More

India’s Hospitals Are Filling Up With Desperate Americans

Foreign Policy, January 2, 2018
by Daniel Block, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article:  Medical tourism thus presents both opportunities and risks. At its best, the industry can help India grow its health care system, using the revenues generated from international… Read More

Full Professor for Quantitative Methods in Public Health and Health Services Research
UMIT - University for Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology in Tirol, Austria

Deadline: January 31, 2018

General Description:UMIT - University for Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology is an accredited private university owned by the Federal State of Tyrol and the University of Innsbruck with… Read More

The Health 202

The Washington Post, November 30, 2017
by Paige Winfield Cunninghamm, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: If the opioid epidemic was simply a problem of supply – people being able to access drugs too easily – than a targeted new effort in Appalachia announced… Read More

Call for Papers on the History of Public Health
Public Health Reports

Deadline: Various

Call for Papers on the History of Public Health: Celebrating the 140th Anniversary of the Journal, Public Health Reports Public Health Reports (PHR) invites submitted articles on the general topic of the… Read More

Research Fellow
Center for Public Health Law, Temple University

Deadline: Open until filled (rolling admissions)

The Center for Public Health Law Research (CPHLR) supports the widespread adoption of scientific tools and methods for mapping and evaluating the impact of law on health. The Center works by developing… Read More

NOW AVAILABLE! Big Data, Health Law, and Bioethics

Cambridge University Press, March 2018
by Edited by I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director), Holly Fernandez Lynch (former Executive Director), Urs Gasser, and Effy Vayena

This edited volume stems from the Petrie-Flom Center’s 2016 annual conference, which brought together leading experts to identify the various ways in which law and ethics intersect with… Read More

Desperate Quest For Herpes Cure Launched ‘Rogue’ Trial

Kaiser Health News, October 19, 2017
by Marisa Taylor, quoting Holly Fernandez Lynch (Former Executive Director, Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: As 20 Americans and Brits flew to a Caribbean island for a controversial herpes vaccine trial, many of them knew there were risks. The lead U.S. researcher, William Halford, openly acknowledged… Read More

Contraceptive Coverage and the Balance Between Conscience and Access

JAMA, October 19, 2017
by Ronit Y. Stahl and Holly Fernandez Lynch (Former Executive Director, Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: When the Obama administration included contraception in the essential benefits package to be covered by employer-sponsored health insurance plans under the Affordable Care Act, it sought… Read More

Call for Abstracts: Public Health Law Conference 2018
The Network for Public Health Law, American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics

Deadline: December 15, 2017

We are accepting abstracts for proposed panels and individual presentations for the 2018 National Public Health Law Conference. We encourage submission of abstracts related to this year's Conference… Read More

Letter to Allergan plc

The House of Representatives Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, October 3, 2017
by By Trey Gowdy, Elijah E. Cummings, Dennis A. Ross, and Peter Welch, citing blog post by Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the letter: On September 8, 2017, your company announced the trans r of six patents related to its Restasis drug to the Saint Regis Mohawk tribe. 1 The unconventional maneuver has received considerable… Read More

Bioinformatics and Data Science for Public Health
Silent Spring Institute

Deadline: Open until filled.

General Description:Silent Spring Institute seeks a versatile bioinformatician, data scientist, machine learning expert, or statistician to tackle big data problems in environmental health and cancer prevention.… Read More

How Gene Cloning In Pigs Could Help Humans Fight Disease

Greater Boston (WGBH, Boston), August 15, 2017
by Jim Braude, interviewing I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

For the next great medical advancement, look not to the test tube, but to the farm. Experiments that were done here in Boston could make it possible to one-day transplant organs from pics into people.… Read More

Academic Fellow Alum Matthew J. B. Lawrence Joins Faculty at Dickinson Law (Penn State)

Dickinson Law, Penn State University, August 1, 2017

Matthew J.B. Lawrence has joined the faculty of Penn State’s Dickinson Law as assistant professor of law. An expert in the fields of health law and administrative law, Lawrence will teach Health… Read More

Petrie-Flom Welcomes New Senior Fellow in Law and Applied Neuroscience!

Petrie-Flom Center, July 21, 2017

We’re excited to announce our 2017–2018 Senior Fellow in Law and Applied Neuroscience, Francis X. Shen! Project on Law and Applied NeuroscienceThe Project on Law and Applied Neuroscience, now… Read More

Public Health Fellowship in Government
American Public Health Association

Deadline: August 14, 2017

The Fellowship in Government provides a unique public policy learning experience, demonstrates the value of science-government interaction and enhances public health science and practical knowledge in… Read More

Katherine Kraschel Joins Solomon Center as New Executive Director

Yale Law School, July 7, 2017

From the article: “I am delighted to welcome Katie to the Solomon Center,” said Professor Abbe R. Gluck ’00, Faculty Director for the Solomon Center. “Having worked with her for… Read More

FDA to Speed Review of Generic Drug Applications Until It’s Approved Three of Them

STAT News, June 27, 2017
by Rebecca Robins, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: The Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday moved to try to spur more competition in the market for generic drugs, an effort aimed at driving down prices. In a policy change,… Read More

The Case for Giving Health-Care Consumers a ‘Nudge’

Wall Street Journal, June 25, 2017
by Lisa Ward, interviewing Christopher T. Robertson (Academic Fellow Alumnus)

The Case for Giving Health-Care Consumers a ‘Nudge:’ A law professor argues that people will make better choices if they’re asked the right way For example, some states encourage child… Read More

Panel: Weighing the Risks of Randomized Controlled Trials and Alternatives

The New York Academy of Sciences, June 21, 2017
by Panel featuring Holly Fernandez Lynch (Executive Director), Amrit Ray, Matthew Rotelli, Steve Usdin, and Robert Walker

On June 21, 2017, Executive Director Holly Fernandez Lynch participated in a panel discussion on "Weighing the Risks of Randomized Controlled Trials and Alternatives," which was part of the conference… Read More

This Pharma Company Won’t Commit to Fairly Pricing a Zika Vaccine You Helped Pay For

The Huffington Post, June 9, 2017
by Alexander C. Kaufman, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: “The incentives for any one company to raise its prices or engage in questionable conduct are quite high, while the incentives for the industry as a whole to corral and police its… Read More

ERISA: A Bipartisan Problem For The ACA And The AHCA

Health Affairs Blog, June 2, 2017
by Abbe R. Gluck, Allison K. Hoffman (Academic Fellow Alumna), and Peter D. Jacobson

From the post: The Supreme Court has once again been called on to mediate the boundaries of a far-reaching, infamously complex, federal employee benefits law. And once again this law may have… Read More

From the Technical to the Personal: Teaching and Learning Health Insurance Regulation and Reform

Saint Louis University Law Journal, Vol. 61, no. 411
by Allison K. Hoffman (Academic Fellow Alumna), Whitney A. Brown, and Lindsay Cutler

From the article: In the Fall of 2016, I taught Health Law and Policy for the fourth consecutive semester. In this repeat loop, one thing has become increasingly clear: the aspect of this survey course… Read More

How a Supreme Court ruling on printer cartridges could have a big impact on drug prices

STAT News, May 30, 2017
by Meghana Keshavan, quoting Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article: A Supreme Court ruling on international printer cartridge sales could have major implications for, of all things, drug pricing and global health. The case in question involves patents,… Read More

Legal Roundtable: Discussing abortion restrictions, health care, Supreme Court developments and more

St. Louis Public Radio, May 30, 2017
by Kelly Moffitt, featuring Rachel Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the radio episode: On Tuesday’s St. Louis on the Air, Legal Roundtable panel returned to discuss pressing issues of the law. They discussed a number of topics, starting with national issues… Read More

Roster exemptions for players with concussions could draw vote from NFL owners

USA Today, May 22, 2017
by Tom Pelissero, citing Petrie-Flom's report

From the article: A short-term injured reserve for players diagnosed with a concussion was among 76 recommendations included in a Harvard Law School report — based on research funded by the NFL Players… Read More

Why Successful Post-Season Runs Make People Lose Their Minds About Concussions

Forbes, May 16, 2017
by Lee Igel, citing Petrie-Flom's report

From the article: Were either or both Crosby and Harden suffering the effects of a head injury, yet seeing game action? Appearances can be deceiving. In addition to medical personnel assessing a player's… Read More

Angel investors are the first stop in a new era of drug development

Newsworks, May 11, 2017
by Elana Gordon, quoting Rachel Sachs

From the article: So is this really the best way to develop new healthcare technologies and therapies? "So there are pros and there are cons," said Rachel Sachs, a law professor at Washington University in… Read More

ORDER NOW & GET 20% OFF! Law, Religion, and Health in the United States

Cambridge University Press, July 2017
by Holly Fernandez Lynch (Executive Director), I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director), and Elizabeth Sepper

About the Book: While the law can create conflict between religion and health, it can also facilitate religious accommodation and protection of conscience. Finding this balance is critical to addressing… Read More

Value-Based Pricing For Pharmaceuticals In The Trump Administration

Health Affairs Blog, April 27, 2017
by Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna), Nicholas Bagley, and Darius Lakdawalla

From the article: Everyone seems to agree: Drug prices are too damn high. Scandalous prices for new drugs and enormous price hikes on old drugs have focused public ire on the pharmaceutical… Read More

As a competitor encroached, Mylan took one state to court to push EpiPen sales, documents

STAT News, April 24, 2017
by Ike Swetlitz, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

From the article:  Three lawyers who reviewed the case at the request of STAT said they could not think of another instance when a pharmaceutical company sued to protect the status of its medication… Read More

Science Needs Your Cells

New York Times, April 21, 2017
by Holly Fernandez Lynch (Executive Director) and Steven Joffe

Biospecimens are essential to medical progress, but just medical waste to patients. Let's promote the science. From the op-ed: Many aspects of Ms. Lacks’s story reflect genuine injustice: the… Read More

Release of New FDA Guidance Declines Sharply Following Trump’s Inauguration

Regulatory Affairs , April 11, 2017
by Zachary Brennan, quoting Rachel E. Sachs (Academic Fellow Alumna)

[...] Rachel Sachs, an associate professor of law at Washington University in St. Louis, told Focus: “I think they're waiting for Gottlieb to set his priorities, and they'll move forward… Read More

Panthers doctor: ‘Turf war’ keeping neurologists off NHL study group

TSN Canada, April 7, 2017
by Rick Westhead, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the article: One Harvard University law professor says that the NHL should overhaul its medical structure to free team doctors and trainers from any real or perceived conflicts of interest. Glenn… Read More