U.S. Steps Up Commitment To Fight Malaria

NPR, February 26, 2015
by Jason Beaubien

The Obama administration on Wednesday announced a six-year extension of a program to combat malaria around the globe.

Read More

WHO ‘taken aback’ by measles outbreaks:

BBC News, February 25, 2015
by Smitha Mundasad

Officials say they have been "taken aback" by more than 22,000 cases in 2014 and the first months of this year. The WHO demands that counties control the outbreaks with…

Read More

PAPER NOW AVAILABLE: Health Law Workshop: Amy Kapczynski

Monday, February 23, 2015 5:00 PM
Health Law Workshops
2014-2015
Griswold Hall, Room 110
1525 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Professor Kapczynski's presentation, "Order Without Intellectual Property Law:  The Flu Network as a Case Study in Open Science," is available…

Read More

Patients with Passports: Medical Tourism, Law, and Ethics

Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs, February 24, 2015
by Robert Klitzman, leading discussion with I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

Live WebstreamWatch the event live online! DescriptionMedical tourism is a growing, multi-billion dollar industry involving millions of patients who travel abroad each year to get health care. Some seek services…

Read More

WHO urges shift to single-use smart syringes:

BBC News, February 23, 2015
by James Gallagher

Reusing syringes leads to more than two million people being infected with diseases including HIV and hepatitis each year. The new needles are more expensive, but the WHO says the…

Read More

Polluted Air Cuts Years Off Lives of Millions in India, Study Finds

New York Times, February 21, 2015
by Gardiner Harris

COLOMBO, Sri Lanka — More than half of India’s population lives in places with such polluted air that each person loses an average of 3.2 years in life expectancy, according to…

Read More

Fifteen-minute Ebola test approved

BBC News, February 20, 2015
by James Gallagher

The first rapid blood test for Ebola has been approved for use by the World Health Organization. It should allow patients to be identified, isolated and cared for as quickly…

Read More

A Mosquito Solution (More Mosquitoes) Raises Heat in Florida Keys

New York Times, February 19, 2015
by Lizette Alvarez

KEY HAVEN, Fla. — In this bite-size community near Key West, like so many other mosquito-plagued spots up and down the Florida Keys, residents long ago made peace with insecticides…

Read More

U.S. to Monitor Air Quality in India and Other Countries

New York Times, February 19, 2015
by Austin Ramzy

HONG KONG — The United States says it will expand air-quality monitoring at some overseas diplomatic missions, following several years of reporting pollution data in China. The goal is to…

Read More

Medical Tourism, Access to Health Care, and Global Justice

Health Law & Human Rights, Vol. 1, Issue 1, 2015
by I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

Abstract: Medical tourism – the travel of patients from one (the “home”) country to another (the “destination”) country for medical treatment – represents a growing business. A number of authors have raised…

Read More

Blood transfusions show early promise as possible Ebola cure:

Al Jazeera America, February 16, 2015
by Amy Maxmen

[...] With the trials coming a year after the start of the outbreak in Guinea, blood treatments will not make much of a dent in the overall death toll, which…

Read More

Tomorrow’s mothers ‘need obesity help’:

BBC News, February 16, 2015

The authors, including a team from Edinburgh University, say children born to overweight mothers are at greater risk of health problems in later life. They say every pregnant woman should…

Read More

Withdrawing Troops, Obama Calls for Vigilance on Ebola

New York Times, February 11, 2015
by Michael D. Shear and Julie Hirschfeld Davis

[...] The announcement reflects vindication for Mr. Obama and the administration, whose slow initial response to the Ebola outbreak raised questions about the president’s ability to handle fast-moving global crises.…

Read More

Canada to allow doctor-assisted suicide

BBC News, February 6, 2015

Canada's Supreme Court has ruled that doctors may help patients who have severe and incurable medical conditions to die, overturning a 1993 ban. [...]

Read More

Clinical Trial Recruitment: Problems, Misconceptions, and Possible Solutions,

Petrie-Flom Center, February 5, 2015

On January 19 - 21, 2015, the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School and the Regulatory Foundations, Ethics, and Law Program of Harvard…

Read More

MPs say yes to three-person babies

BBC News, February 3, 2015
by James Gallagher

MPs have voted in favour of the creation of babies with DNA from two women and one man, in an historic move. The UK is now set to become the…

Read More

Ebola Drug Trial Is Halted for Lack of Patients

New York Times, February 1, 2015
by Andrew Pollack

A clinical trial in Liberia of a drug to treat Ebola has been halted because of a sharp decline in the number of people infected with the virus, and studies…

Read More

Ebola outbreak response reaches endgame, WHO says:

Al Jazeera America, January 29, 2015

The number of new confirmed Ebola cases totaled 99 in the week to Jan. 25, the lowest tally since June 2014, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Thursday, signaling…

Read More

Program Manager

Program Manager
Harvard Multi-Regional Clinical Trials Center

Deadline: Open until filled.

The mission of the MRCT Center at Harvard is to improve the design, conduct, and oversight of multi-regional clinical trials, especially trials sited in or involving the developing world; to simplify research through the use…

Read More

Cigarette package law to be voted on by MPs before election:

BBC News, January 22, 2015

It follows a series of public consultations on the issue. Public Health Minister Jane Ellison told MPs the move was likely to have a positive impact on public health, particularly…

Read More

Supreme Court Rules in Favor of Teva Over Patent for Multiple Sclerosis Drug

New York Times, January 20, 2015
by Reuters

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court on Tuesday ruled that Teva Pharmaceutical Industries could still benefit from patent protection for a multiple sclerosis drug, dealing a blow to makers of generic…

Read More

Rocketing vaccine cost warning:

BBC News, January 20, 2015
by James Gallagher

A report by the charity says there has been a 68-fold increase in prices between 2001 and 2014. It accused the pharmaceutical industry of overcharging and highlighted cases where rich…

Read More

What’s Most Likely To Kill You? Hint:

NPR, January 19, 2015
by Jason Beaubien

Noncommunicable diseases have become the leading killers around the globe. In 2012, two-thirds of all deaths worldwide were the result of conditions such as heart disease, cancer, diabetes and respiratory…

Read More

Joining Forces: A Story of Science and Religion in Rural Ghana

Humanist Community at Harvard, February 1, 2015

How do science and religion interact in the delivery of mental health care in one region of Ghana? Lauren Taylor will guide a discussion about the value and limits of…

Read More

Gilead’s India Patent Snag May Spur More Low-Cost Sovaldi Copies

Bloomberg, January 15, 2015
by Ketaki Gokhale

The Indian patent office’s rejection of a key patent for Gilead Sciences Inc. (GILD)’s Hepatitis C treatment Sovaldi may pave the way for more low-cost copies in the country, potentially aiding…

Read More

U.S. Funding of Health Research Stalls As Other Nations Rev Up

NPR, January 13, 2015
by Richard Harris

Though the United States is still leading the world in research related to diseases, it is rapidly losing its edge, according to an analysis in the American Medical Association's flagship journal JAMA. If…

Read More

Bill Gates Raises A Glass To (And Of) Water Made From Poop

NPR, January 10, 2015
by Linda Poon

In places where fresh water is hard to come by, how do you come up with clean drinking water? Easy — get the water from poop. It's a scientifically sound…

Read More

In Africa, a Decline in New Ebola Cases Complicates Vaccine Development

New York Times, January 9, 2015
by Andrew Pollack

As authorities and drug companies hurriedly prepare to begin testing Ebola vaccines in West Africa, they are starting to contemplate a new challenge: whether an ebbing of the outbreak could make it…

Read More

India’s deadly medicine:

Al Jazeera America, January 6, 2015

India has seen a dangerous surge in the abuse of prescription drugs. Pharmacies are selling cocktails of medical-grade drugs to addicts for up to a tenth of the cost of…

Read More

Interview with Faculty Director I. Glenn Cohen about “Patients with Passports”:

Jefferson Public Radio (Oregon), January 5, 2015
by Geoffrey Riley and Charlotte Duren

If your doctor won't recommend a medical procedure you want, you can go to another doctor.  But would you travel to another country for the procedure?  And how about if…

Read More

I. Glenn Cohen discusses the Ebola crisis

America's Forum, NewsMax TV, December 23, 2014

Harvard Law professor and medical ethics expert talks about how the Ebola crisis is just one example of how Americans and other travelers are at risk for deadly disease when…

Read More

Research Assistant: International Health and Drug Law

Research Assistant: International Health and Drug Law
Multi-Regional Clinical Trials Center at Harvard

Deadline: Open until filled

Mark Barnes is seeking one or two research assistants for the Multi-Regional Clinical Trials Center at Harvard (Harvard MRCT), of which he is faculty co-chair. Harvard MRCT is part of the Harvard Global Health Institute. …

Read More

Obesity ‘could be a disability’ - EU courts rule

BBC News, December 18, 2014

Obesity can constitute a disability in certain circumstances, the EU's highest court has ruled. The European Court of Justice was asked to consider the case of a male childminder in…

Read More

Rules for babies ‘from three people’

BBC News, December 17, 2014
by James Gallagher

The rules for creating babies from three people - which state only two would be classed as parents - have been announced by the UK government. The fertility technique uses…

Read More

Traveling patients, traveling disease:

OUPblog, December 14, 2014
by I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

Many in the media and academia (myself included) have been discussing the Ebola crisis, and more specifically, the issues that arise as Ebola has traveled with infected patients and health…

Read More

China’s E-Cigarette Boom Lacks Oversight for Safety

New York Times, December 13, 2014
by David Barboza

SHENZHEN, China — In a grimy workshop, among boiling vats of chemicals, factory workers are busy turning stainless steel rods into slender tube casings, a crucial component of electronic cigarettes.…

Read More

Food allergy laws enforced in restaurants and takeaways

BBC News, December 11, 2014
by Smitha Mundasad

Restaurants and takeaways across Europe will be required by law to tell customers if their food contains ingredients known to trigger allergies. Staff must provide information on 14 everyday allergens…

Read More

Ebola outbreak:

BBC News, December 10, 2014
by Tulip Mazumdar

The Ebola virus that has killed thousands in West Africa is still "running ahead" of efforts to contain it, the head of the World Health Organization has said. Director general…

Read More

Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Science, Ethics, and Democracy

Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Science, Ethics, and Democracy
The Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics

Deadline: February 15, 2015

Grant Amount: $28,000 The Edmond J. Safra Center at Tel Aviv University is accepting applications for its 2015-16 post-doctorate fellowship program.  The Center offers grants to outstanding researchers who study the…

Read More

Traveling Overseas for Medical Care

WOSU (NPR), December 10, 2014
by All Sides with Ann Fisher, interviewing I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

From the WOSU:All-inclusive vacations might feature a stay in a luxury hotel, gourmet meals, and in some cases, a hip replacement. Companies that specialize in medical tourism help patients in the…

Read More

‘Superbugs’ Kill India’s Babies and Pose an Overseas Threat

New York Times, December 3, 2014
by Gardiner Harris

AMRAVATI, India — A deadly epidemic that could have global implications is quietly sweeping India, and among its many victims are tens of thousands of newborns dying because once-miraculous cures no…

Read More

Law Professor Discusses Medical Tourism

Harvard Crimson, November 20, 2014
by Katherine H. Scott, quoting I. Glenn Cohen (Faculty Director)

When most people hear the word “tourism,” they immediately think of flocking to the sandy beaches of the Caribbean or exploring museums in a European city. For Harvard Law School…

Read More

Book Launch: Patients with Passports: Medical Tourism, Law, and Ethics

Wednesday, November 19, 2014 12:00 PM
Lectures and Panels
2014-2015
Harvard Law School Library, Langdell Hall, Caspersen Room
1557 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

I. Glenn Cohen's new book Patients with Passports: Medical Tourism, Law, and Ethics  (Oxford University Press, 2014) is the first comprehensive…

Read More

Web of Incentives in Fatal Indian Sterilizations

New York Times, November 12, 2014
by Ellen Barry and Suhasini Raj

[...] When Ms. Nirmalkar arrived at the “sterilization camp” on Saturday, she found a clinic streaked with cobwebs, its hallways covered by a film of dust, so long abandoned that…

Read More

Global Reproduction:
Health, Law, and Human Rights in Surrogacy and Egg Donation

Wednesday, November 05, 2014 5:00 - 7:00 PM
Lectures and Panels
2014-2015
Wasserstein Hall, Room 1010
Harvard Law School, Cambridge, MA

A screening of the documentary Can We See the Baby Bump, Please?, which was followed by a panel discussion of the legal…

Read More